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Congress supports FCC net neutrality rule

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posted on Dec, 5 2011 @ 01:42 PM
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Congress has rejected the proposal to disapprove of the FCC net neutrality rule by a a vote of 52 - 46. A slim margin, but it means the internet (at least in the US) will remain open and fully accessible.

I received this email from Sen. Harkin's (D, IA) office this morning:


December 5, 2011


You recently contacted my office to express your views on net neutrality. I write today to update you on actions in Congress related to this issue.

The Senate recently voted on S.J.Res. 6, a "resolution of disapproval" that would have prohibited the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) from implementing rules to safeguard a free and open Internet. I joined with a majority of my colleagues in voting to defeat the resolution, meaning the FCC rules will go into effect-a victory for consumers.

Unfiltered access to information and services is the hallmark of the Internet. That is why I support the FCC's rules. Contrary to what you may have heard, the FCC's proposal does not amount to a "government takeover of the Internet." The rules are narrow in scope, regulating only Internet service providers, not websites. The rules, for example, prevent service providers from slowing down or speeding up access to websites that they might favor or disfavor and are banned from blocking websites or applications, for example, that might compete with their own services.

Universal, affordable, and unfiltered access to the Internet is central to economic growth, job creation, and global competitiveness for our country. For these reasons, I will continue to support legislation, policies, and practices that improve and expand Internet access.

Thank you for your continued interest in these matters. Please do not hesitate to contact me should you have any questions or if I can be of any assistance to you.


Sincerely,

Tom Harkin
United States Senator




S.J.Res.6:

A joint resolution disapproving the rule submitted by the Federal Communications Commission with respect to regulating the Internet and broadband industry practices.

OpenCongress.org

The link is a list of how each Senator voted. It might be confusing, but remember: an "Aye" vote means they rejected the net neutrality rule and a "Nay" vote means the supported it.




posted on Dec, 5 2011 @ 03:18 PM
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reply to post by N3k9Ni
 


Thanks much for the update. Seems like good news. Has anyone analyzed the legislation?

S&F& :second line:



posted on Dec, 5 2011 @ 05:43 PM
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reply to post by soficrow
 



There are 2 versions of Bill Number S.J.RES.6 for the 112th Congress. Usually, the last item is the most recent.
1 . Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That Congress disapproves the rule submitted by the Federal Communications... (Introduced in Senate - IS)[S.J.RES.6.IS][PDF]
2 . Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That Congress disapproves the rule submitted by the Federal Communications... (Placed on Calendar Senate - PCS)[S.J.RES.6.PCS][PDF]

The Library of Congress

The resolution seems to be pretty straight forward. Yes or no to allow the FCC rule. Whether this is final or another version will come up, I don't know. I really hope this is said and done.



posted on Dec, 5 2011 @ 05:55 PM
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reply to post by N3k9Ni
 


Do you have a copy (link) of the FCC's net neutrality rule that was vetoed? ......I haven't stayed on top of the issue and forget just about everything. :blush:



posted on Dec, 5 2011 @ 07:37 PM
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reply to post by soficrow
 


First off, let me clear this up. I know it gets confusing.

The FCC wants to set up rules prohibiting ISPs and mobile broadband providers from blocking access to websites and/or third party services (voice and video). The resolution presented to Congress was to prevent the FCC from enforcing those rules. The resolution was rejected, therefore, Congress has authorized the FCC to enforce those rules.

A couple of PDFs to look over:

FCC argument for net neutrality
Draft of Proposed Rules

I'm actually glad to have this discussion. I've gained a better understanding of the proposals, also.



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