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Occupy Food

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posted on Dec, 3 2011 @ 10:58 PM
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Occupy McDonalds, i mean everyone deserves a Happy Meal right ?








posted on Dec, 3 2011 @ 11:43 PM
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reply to post by JustSlowlyBackAway
 


I still have two tomatoes left, and about 5 red and green peppers in the fridge. The dill is still good, and harvested the best chocolate mint for tea this winter.

Every county in every state has an Extension Service. And are excellent sources of information. Just take a couple hours and go by their office. See what they got. They will know what grows best for that area. Who's marketing local. Soil and water testing can be done there.

This does need a paradigm shift in our culture in the current generations. Before we totally screw up human genetics with really untested product. Truely, they don't know the long term affects of everyday common materials. So in as many cases as possible I try to use practices and materials that are 100 years old or more. Cast iron kettles and skillets. Being mindful of current food safety standards of course.

Do you think a grassroots movement would actually happen, if providing education for implementing the alternatives and health conscience choices?



posted on Dec, 4 2011 @ 02:17 AM
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Great thread!

Made me think. Over the last year or so I started shopping at Aldi’s, it’s basically groceries for poor people. I buy most of my produce there because it is AT LEAST half the price of the middle class grocery stores. I bought potatoes there the first time, and they were really weird. They looked, felt, and tasted really different. A few months later I decided to try them again, maybe it was a bad batch….They were the exact same strange potatoes. I will pay closer attention to the look and taste of the other veggies now….I don’t know what good it will do, because until summer, that’s all we will be eating.

Scary Shizznit.



posted on Dec, 4 2011 @ 02:37 AM
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I'm going to occupy In & Out anyone up for a milkshake fries and a Double Double? This thread is making me hungry sorry...



posted on Dec, 4 2011 @ 07:12 AM
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Originally posted by SunflowerStar
reply to post by JustSlowlyBackAway
 


I still have two tomatoes left, and about 5 red and green peppers in the fridge. The dill is still good, and harvested the best chocolate mint for tea this winter.

Every county in every state has an Extension Service. And are excellent sources of information. Just take a couple hours and go by their office. See what they got. They will know what grows best for that area. Who's marketing local. Soil and water testing can be done there.

This does need a paradigm shift in our culture in the current generations. Before we totally screw up human genetics with really untested product. Truely, they don't know the long term affects of everyday common materials. So in as many cases as possible I try to use practices and materials that are 100 years old or more. Cast iron kettles and skillets. Being mindful of current food safety standards of course.

Do you think a grassroots movement would actually happen, if providing education for implementing the alternatives and health conscience choices?


When they DO know there are negative effects, the big corporations have bought off or hired anyone who might object. So, as long as people trust the word of the FDA, or mainstream nutritional propaganda, then possibly no one will bother to make changes. They think they ARE eating a healthy diet because they have been told that it is. Nevermind that the evidence is to the contrary. That evidence takes digging, and it contradicts the thinking of most people who are filling their carts with non-food and wondering what pill they should take to get well again.

We live on a small plot in a town, and we don't have huge space to garden. But we do it, and we supply a huge portion of our vegetables throughout the year. It takes some work, as you know, but it's NOT expensive to get started or do it. You just have to find a sunny spot, flip the sod, dig it in, make a compost heap, and get cranking. Seeds are cheap. And there are great books out there that deal with sustenance farming. That and sprouting on the windowsill keep us in fresh veggies all year. Second best? Home canned and frozen.

You do the things that can be done, and adjust to things that you cannot change. But most people don't understand and don't want to understand. If you suggest that drinking soda pop filled with HFCS is damaging, then they stop listening. They LIKE it. End of story.

There is a grassroots movement to escape the tyranny or modern factory food, but it is made up of quiet people who just do what they can to be more independent and healthier. And they are. It's my feeling that most people don't want to know, and when they do know, are not willing to give up their _____(fill in the blank).



posted on Dec, 4 2011 @ 07:20 AM
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Originally posted by MidnightSunshine
Great thread!

Made me think. Over the last year or so I started shopping at Aldi’s, it’s basically groceries for poor people. I buy most of my produce there because it is AT LEAST half the price of the middle class grocery stores. I bought potatoes there the first time, and they were really weird. They looked, felt, and tasted really different. A few months later I decided to try them again, maybe it was a bad batch….They were the exact same strange potatoes. I will pay closer attention to the look and taste of the other veggies now….I don’t know what good it will do, because until summer, that’s all we will be eating.

Scary Shizznit.


Watch for sales. You don't need to buy funky potatoes. Plus, if you're looking for a starchy replacement, rice is not expensive. Potatoes are one of the most pesticide-laden vegetables on the market. I have heard that potato farmers save a separate plot for their own families where they don't treat them with all the fungicides and insecticides. You can find organic ones, but they are more expensive - something you wish to avoid if i understand you correctly.

Another cheap way to get fresh veggies on the table is to sprout seeds on the windowsill. You can get a sprouter lid that fits mason jars and the seeds are cheap.

But if there is any tiny bit of land available to you - or even if you have a balcony or deck that gets sun, next spring, why not plant some kale or chard or even a few tomatoes? You'd be surprised at how much great tasting, healthy produce you can produce in very tiny spaces. And it's better for you than those funky potatoes at Aldi's.



posted on Dec, 4 2011 @ 09:16 AM
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reply to post by JustSlowlyBackAway
 



Another cheap way to get fresh veggies on the table is to sprout seeds on the windowsill. You can get a sprouter lid that fits mason jars and the seeds are cheap.


IMPORTANT: Start sprout seeds in a DARK cupboard - only bring them out in the light after they sprout.

Also - check out "vertical gardens" - I haven't tried this yet, but want to this winter.




Concept Vertical Garden lets you grow food on your window
How to make your own low-tech vertical farm



posted on Dec, 4 2011 @ 10:42 AM
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reply to post by soficrow
 


That's amazing, thanks for sharing that. I'm going to try that after Christmas. This is something that people all over the world need to know about, even if you have just one sunny window.



posted on Dec, 4 2011 @ 11:44 AM
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Originally posted by soficrow
reply to post by JustSlowlyBackAway
 



Another cheap way to get fresh veggies on the table is to sprout seeds on the windowsill. You can get a sprouter lid that fits mason jars and the seeds are cheap.


IMPORTANT: Start sprout seeds in a DARK cupboard - only bring them out in the light after they sprout.



I didn't know that. I always sprout them in the light. We do alfalfa, mung beans, and also mustard, cress and broccoli on damp cotton. Why do they need to be in the dark? I'm curious.



posted on Dec, 4 2011 @ 12:50 PM
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Originally posted by Neopan100
reply to post by moonweed
 


I have wondered the same thing about the seeds. I bought a few different winter squash varieties at the reg grocery store and when I was cutting them I guess one of the seeds sprang out and into the pot of paper whites growing on my kitchen table. There are now squash plants growing with the paperwhites. I just figured all seeds from fruits/veggies bought at the grocery store wouldn't reproduce. Well low and behold they are growing...but how do I know they were not GM'd? The paper whites have no dirt and are just growing in some water and rocks.....



that's just a bit too strange...guess that just helped me make my decision not to buy seeds, and grow my own stuff...or should i???
edit on 2011/12/4 by moonweed because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 4 2011 @ 05:03 PM
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Live GA with farmers now at Zucotti Park (Liberty Sq.) Manhattan, NY

www.ustream.tv...



posted on Dec, 4 2011 @ 05:18 PM
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reply to post by JustSlowlyBackAway
 


I always assumed it's because that's what happens naturally (they're underground). ...Have an old book on Ayurvedic cooking with directions - that's what it says to do, is how I've always done it.




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