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Important artifact removed from the strange mask of Comalcalco

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posted on Dec, 3 2011 @ 11:24 PM
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Originally posted by MonteroReal

Originally posted by lostinspace


Do you know the meaning behind the outstretched tongue?


Obvious, Sympathy for the Devil.


I was looking for something maybe associated with needing water, being killed, acting crazy or the warrior's cry.
I put my bet on the warrior's cry, right before going to battle. This image reminds me of the medusa head on Athena's shield. Athena is the goddess of war.


The Goddess Athena is a part of Greek Mythology. Athena was the Greek Goddess of War and the Greek Goddess of Wisdom. She was also known as the Goddess of Weaving and Metal Working. However, as the Goddess of War, her field of expertise was not violence and so on. That was the domain of Ares, God of War. Athena was the Goddess of the more disciplined aspect of War, such as Strategy.
www.buzzle.com...




edit on 3-12-2011 by lostinspace because: added another idea

edit on 3-12-2011 by lostinspace because: added quote about Athena




posted on Dec, 4 2011 @ 06:03 AM
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reply to post by Xcalibur254
 


To point out, if it is a "unique Mayan city", then we would have to ask why? Of course, we can ignore possible conspiracies as to why the city looks so Roman (or why the aqualine nose is so prominent, as that is a VERY Egyptian trait). But that is not very scholarly, as it ignores the all important question of "Why was this city unique in all of Mayan culture".

To someone who wasn't already programmed with what passes for "scientific knowledge", they might consider that a city that is unique to a culture may not belong to that culture at all. And, in that case, might view your comments as coming from an archaelogical "Officer Barbrady": "Nothing to see here folks, just move along."



posted on Dec, 4 2011 @ 01:58 PM
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Originally posted by bigfatfurrytexan
reply to post by Xcalibur254
 


To point out, if it is a "unique Mayan city", then we would have to ask why?


Its considered unique as it was built on a site without sufficient limestone to build it like all other known Mayan cities and they rather cleverly figured out how to make bricks, flat ones which are easier to dry instead of fat ones which require a kiln.....

oh other comment there are 'x' number of marks you can make. If you take two cultures, one located at the north pole and another at the south and have them make up marks to put on bricks, after a few hundred years of making bricks what are the chances that they will both have totally separate sets of marks?

I will let you ponder that. Here is another challenge; create 1,000 marks suitable for marking in wet pottery (not to complex) and make then completely unique, never having been used by any civilization, culture or artist anywhere in the world previously - good luck



posted on Dec, 4 2011 @ 02:31 PM
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reply to post by lostinspace
 


What I find very awkward about this mask along with other sites and artifacts is 'they' seem to always destroy the noses,it does seem like there is someone that always destroys that part of a lot of artifacts.Has anyone else noticed this?



posted on Dec, 4 2011 @ 02:42 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


These marks don't even exist. Go to any site where they claim there is evidence of Roman influence at Comalcalco. Not a single one of them will actually be able to produce photographic evidence of these marks. They all only have a drawing that has its origin with a known fraud. It should also be noted that the bricks aren't even close to being the same as the bricks commonly produced in Rome. These pseudoscientists would be better off comparing the bricks to those found in Babylon, but even then there is no connection whatsoever.



posted on Dec, 5 2011 @ 10:28 PM
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Originally posted by patmac573
reply to post by lostinspace
 


What I find very awkward about this mask along with other sites and artifacts is 'they' seem to always destroy the noses,it does seem like there is someone that always destroys that part of a lot of artifacts.Has anyone else noticed this?


Someone mentioned before that 90% of the noses of Chaac are missing. A number of them are missing because they broke off due to the weight. Some of designs protrude in the fashion of an elephant trunk and would have smashed to pieces on the ground. Have all the noses fallen to the ground or were some made of precious material awaiting a thief's hand?



posted on Dec, 6 2011 @ 08:55 AM
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Originally posted by lostinspace
Someone mentioned before that 90% of the noses of Chaac are missing. A number of them are missing because they broke off due to the weight. Some of designs protrude in the fashion of an elephant trunk and would have smashed to pieces on the ground. Have all the noses fallen to the ground or were some made of precious material awaiting a thief's hand?


How about the hands of the conquistadors... and rival nations?

These weren't peaceful people and they often had wars where they overran cities -- and then the Spaniards came in and destroyed all the idols they could get their hands on. Between that and centuries of neglect (and the action of trees and vines and gravity (as things the statues were placed in just fell over or the statues fell over)), it's no wonder that the parts of statues which stick out the most are broken.

Same reason that many Roman and Greek statues have broken arms.



posted on Dec, 6 2011 @ 09:03 AM
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Originally posted by bigfatfurrytexan
reply to post by Xcalibur254
 


To point out, if it is a "unique Mayan city", then we would have to ask why? Of course, we can ignore possible conspiracies as to why the city looks so Roman (or why the aqualine nose is so prominent, as that is a VERY Egyptian trait).

Actually, the city doesn't look Roman at all. Nor are their other statues ones which depict "aquiline noses." This particular deity is one of the very few with a stylized beak nose.


But that is not very scholarly, as it ignores the all important question of "Why was this city unique in all of Mayan culture".


Uhm... every city is actually unique in may ways. Dallas, for instance, is quite unique, as is Big Spring (you won't find another city laid out in exactly the same way with the exact same features (like the ex-military base at the bottom of the Edwards escarpment) and a spring at exactly the same location in it. Every city has different municipal art, too. It would be weirder to find homogeneous cities, both ancient and modern.


To someone who wasn't already programmed with what passes for "scientific knowledge", they might consider that a city that is unique to a culture may not belong to that culture at all.

Yes, if someone hasn't taken a lot of time to read up and understand a culture (including familiarizing themselves with the art styles, historical periods, major artifacts, major symbols, and any writing available), they could see make a case for (say) a city like Olympia (in Greece, the original home of the Olympics) as not being built by the Greeks themselves.

And that's a problem on the Internet. Most folks simply watch videos or tv and don't spend a lot of time visiting sites or going to museums or reading up on what's known about the sites.



posted on Dec, 6 2011 @ 10:00 AM
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reply to post by Byrd
 





Most folks simply watch videos or tv and don't spend a lot of time visiting sites or going to museums or reading up on what's known about the sites


Howdy Byrd

A quote from an archaeologist I once studied under concerning Middle-East Bronze age archaeology, 'You will need to read for twenty years, and after you finish that you'll have to catch up with all the new publications that have come out since then'. To understand a culture or even a process (like archaeology) takes a great deal of data.

Did you complete your dis?



posted on Dec, 6 2011 @ 03:36 PM
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reply to post by Byrd
 


Funny you should say that.

I was talking with the curator of special collections at Tech (and his wife, who was doing a presentation) about two weeks ago. They came and toured some of the historic building in our area (mine being one of them).

During the presentation, she put up a slide of 42nd Street in Odessa. Of course, I recognized it immediately. I am from the area, and drive that street fairly often during my travels of all the local towns. But her point is correct, and she belabored it, that many towns (and cities) are achingly similar. The nationalized (and globalized) corporations have created a similarity in American towns that is becoming increasingly dull, dreary, and lacking in flair. Drive into any town in Texas and you will find a few tall and unique buildings in the downtown area. But, for the most part, it is all the same stores, looking identical to each other and placed in predictable locations.

Even Dallas I spent 6 weeks living at the Stoneleigh. Of course, the Bolla is a GREAT restaurant (the best I had in Dallas, even better than Big Spring native, Stephen Pyle, and his "Samar"), but I would still have to venture out to find something else to eat due to budget, etc. All I had to do was drive away from downtown/uptown, and I found all the normal spots: Subway, Jack in the Box, McDonalds, etc.

Just like our political parties, the differences are not very many. The sameness makes it very comfortable, I guess.



posted on Dec, 7 2011 @ 11:50 AM
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Originally posted by Hanslune
A quote from an archaeologist I once studied under concerning Middle-East Bronze age archaeology, 'You will need to read for twenty years, and after you finish that you'll have to catch up with all the new publications that have come out since then'. To understand a culture or even a process (like archaeology) takes a great deal of data.

Did you complete your dis?


I have a wide (but weak, imho) understanding of a lot of archaeology. I often wish I knew more, but am well aware of just how much reading I'd need to do (and I read quickly... around 600 words per minute) just to get up to speed with the current activities. Getting a historical perspective would take longer.

You know what they say -- the more that you learn, the more acutely you recognize just how much there is that you understand poorly.

Still working on the dissertation. It's changed ... will be doing a metamodel based on interviews. The first (introductory) section is written, and I'm working on the literature review and firm problem statement. And looking at the math (dear gods...)



posted on Dec, 7 2011 @ 12:04 PM
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Originally posted by bigfatfurrytexan
reply to post by Byrd
 


Funny you should say that.

I was talking with the curator of special collections at Tech (and his wife, who was doing a presentation) about two weeks ago. They came and toured some of the historic building in our area (mine being one of them).


(chuckle) Small world. I was friends with one of his lab assistants while I was at tech. She had such tales of field trips... and collecting small mammals.


But her point is correct, and she belabored it, that many towns (and cities) are achingly similar. The nationalized (and globalized) corporations have created a similarity in American towns that is becoming increasingly dull, dreary, and lacking in flair. Drive into any town in Texas and you will find a few tall and unique buildings in the downtown area. But, for the most part, it is all the same stores, looking identical to each other and placed in predictable locations.


To our eyes, yes. We understand and recognize the main themes in our cultures.

Now... suppose that it's one of the San Bushmen looking at our town, with no understanding of our culture or our language or symbols. The Statue of Liberty outside the Big Spring Courthouse would look excitingly different. If the Bushman had only seen pictures of some of the campus at Angelo State University and of the churches in Midlothian, think how amazing the Big Spring Courthouse would look.

Think how many ways he or she could interpret the things held by Lady Liberty if this person had never seen a robe, never seen a book, never seen a torch, didn't know a thing about crowns or limestone or Texas municipal architecture patterns-- and yet decided to show off his knowledge by playing tour guide and explaining the statue and the building.


Even Dallas I spent 6 weeks living at the Stoneleigh. Of course, the Bolla is a GREAT restaurant (the best I had in Dallas, even better than Big Spring native, Stephen Pyle, and his "Samar"), but I would still have to venture out to find something else to eat due to budget, etc. All I had to do was drive away from downtown/uptown, and I found all the normal spots: Subway, Jack in the Box, McDonalds, etc.

Just like our political parties, the differences are not very many. The sameness makes it very comfortable, I guess.


(Stoneleigh... oooh! Of course, my favorite is still the Anatole.)

It makes you an expert in THIS culture. You recognize our international symbols for "men's restrooms" and "women's restrooms" and "handicapped accessible." To someone from an Amazon tribe brought into contact with these symbols for the first time, these aren't even recognizable as male or female bodies. They may never have seen a wheelchair and have no idea that severely disabled people can live and function in society.

Sadly, many folks speculating on things are in the same position as the Bushman I described. They don't speak the language, don't know the common cultural markers, don't know how to look them up (or don't care to or don't trust sources), yet they are willing to act as tour guides and explain things to others.



posted on Dec, 7 2011 @ 01:47 PM
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Originally posted by Byrd

Originally posted by Hanslune
A quote from an archaeologist I once studied under concerning Middle-East Bronze age archaeology, 'You will need to read for twenty years, and after you finish that you'll have to catch up with all the new publications that have come out since then'. To understand a culture or even a process (like archaeology) takes a great deal of data.

Did you complete your dis?


I have a wide (but weak, imho) understanding of a lot of archaeology. I often wish I knew more, but am well aware of just how much reading I'd need to do (and I read quickly... around 600 words per minute) just to get up to speed with the current activities. Getting a historical perspective would take longer.

You know what they say -- the more that you learn, the more acutely you recognize just how much there is that you understand poorly.

Still working on the dissertation. It's changed ... will be doing a metamodel based on interviews. The first (introductory) section is written, and I'm working on the literature review and firm problem statement. And looking at the math (dear gods...)


Well you are making progress!

Ye gods have you hit that most ungodly of things, ssps software?



posted on Dec, 7 2011 @ 11:52 PM
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Originally posted by Byrd
Sadly, many folks speculating on things are in the same position as the Bushman I described. They don't speak the language, don't know the common cultural markers, don't know how to look them up (or don't care to or don't trust sources), yet they are willing to act as tour guides and explain things to others.


Are you calling me a radical? I shouldn’t speak unless spoken too?

Where’s the fun in that?

I’m no tour guide. I’m just the guy on the corner yelling ‘outside the box’ babble. You see us making mountains out of mole hills. Well, sometimes the mole hills have GiNormous networks of tunnels making them mountains. Some of us have the drive to challenge the established thought. This makes ATS fun compared to a class following a text book. This is a conspiracy site and there will be no quizzes when we’re tired of browsing here.



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