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Turkey Intensifies Sanctions Against Syrian Regime

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posted on Nov, 30 2011 @ 05:03 PM
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Well this picture isn't looking any prettier. Now Turkey is freezing some assets of Syria. The Arab League will also restrict travel of Syrian Diplomats. I'm sure Assad wont just sit idly by. I wonder if there will be some sort of tit for tat action here.

I'm sure as time goes by more shall be revealed.

As always Stay tuned.


Turkey Intensifies Sanctions Against Syrian Regime

ISTANBUL — Turkey took steps Wednesday to freeze the Syrian government’s financial assets, impose a travel ban on senior Syrian regime officials and cut off transactions with the country’s central bank, sharply escalating international pressure on Damascus in response to its continuing violence against civilians. The latest measures, Turkish officials said, were enacted in concert with the Arab League, which imposed broad trade sanctions on Sunday, and are part of a developing international effort to strangle Syria’s economy and severely diminish the power of its government.

The Arab League also unveiled on Wednesday a list of 17 senior Syrian officials who could face a travel ban to other Arab countries, including the ministers of defense and interior. Also on the list are Rami Makhlouf, a millionaire cousin of President Bashar al-Assad who has controlled the mobile phone network; Mr. Assad’s younger brother Maher, who is believed to have played a leading role in orchestrating the repression; and members of the state security service, including Maj. Gen. Assef Shawkat, the deputy chief of staff for security affairs who is married to the sister of President Assad.

edit on 30-11-2011 by SLAYER69 because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 30 2011 @ 05:06 PM
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Yep...best way to try and solve something diplomatically is to prevent diplomats from doing just that...

However....IMO Turkey and NATO could care less at this point and are just frothing at the mouth ready to pounce.
edit on 30-11-2011 by Vardoger because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 30 2011 @ 05:19 PM
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We need to consider our friends and allies in the region.



I'm looking at this strategically and I can't help but wonder,

If Turkey attacks Syria from the rear, would Greece help?



posted on Nov, 30 2011 @ 05:20 PM
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reply to post by Vardoger
 


Let's hope not but at this stage I think the jig is up for Assad and co...

I'm hoping this wont be as bad as Libya



posted on Nov, 30 2011 @ 05:23 PM
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Seems like every hour or so a new story about military movement or threats are popping up to many to fast,and what worries me no nation has stepped in a try to be a resolver I guess maybe thats still aways off yet.



posted on Nov, 30 2011 @ 05:33 PM
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Great thread as usual Slayer
Agreed, very disturbing, however, I just dont think these sanctions will help. Russia refuses to let the punishment be too harsh from what ive read. Comes a time when "go" means "go" just get the ball rolling and get it done. People are dying and alledgedly children are being tortured.? I just think the US and NATO need to quit being intimidated by the russians!!!! Out of all of the countries that EVER needed to be invaded, it is Syria and because of these human rights tradgedies. WHAT ARE WE WAITING FOR



posted on Nov, 30 2011 @ 05:38 PM
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reply to post by Alxandro
 


A couple of weeks ago, NATO told me that they would NOT have anything to do with a no-fly zone over Syria. I talked to them again last night and asked the same question. It is the official NATO position that "NATO" will not do anything, but individual members "may do whatever they feel is within their national interest." With the US, France, and Turkey (maybe others) poised to institute a no-fly zone over Syria, how that technicality is going to convince the Russians that this is not really a NATO operation is beyond me.

But considering their long, antagonistic history - and the fact that they don't have a pot to piss in at the moment - I wouldn't expect Greece to do anything to help the Turks.



posted on Nov, 30 2011 @ 05:48 PM
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This is an interesting time in that region. There's 2 bucks there. Israel and Turkey. Normally good trading partners. Someone is sleeping on the couch right now though. They are also linked through NATO. While not a signatory, Israel is an ally of many of the NATO countries. Turkey IS a signatory of the NATO pact. One thing you can say, this isn't going to be boring.



posted on Nov, 30 2011 @ 05:57 PM
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reply to post by OldCorp
 


Agreed, Greece wont be able to do much if it happens maybe some air support or what not but that's about it me thinks.



posted on Nov, 30 2011 @ 06:48 PM
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Originally posted by SLAYER69
reply to post by OldCorp
 


Agreed, Greece wont be able to do much if it happens maybe some air support or what not but that's about it me thinks.


You do realize the Greek question from the other poster was meant as a (bad) joke, right?



posted on Nov, 30 2011 @ 06:56 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod
 


Yes,

Even though they are in the predicament they are in they still have a Military with capable hardware.
edit on 30-11-2011 by SLAYER69 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 30 2011 @ 08:15 PM
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Originally posted by Zaphod

Originally posted by SLAYER69
reply to post by OldCorp
 


Agreed, Greece wont be able to do much if it happens maybe some air support or what not but that's about it me thinks.


You do realize the Greek question from the other poster was meant as a (bad) joke, right?


Now I do. "Beware Greeks bearing gifts." *Especially if they approach from behind.

I've had my game face on for so long I guess my sense of humor is suffering. I need to take a day off and go hunting.



posted on Dec, 1 2011 @ 11:25 AM
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Let's hope this latest stance by Turkey doesn't result in more bloodshed/drag the unrest out in Syria as feared by a Syrian cited in the OP's article:


In Syria, some people said they feared the sanctions could embolden government supporters and focus criticism on external forces. “The sanctions will make the regime supporters even more supportive,” said Joelle, 25, a graphic designer from Damascus. “That’s the notion I’m getting from people around me. They are blaming Arab nations for what’s happening to them, and reminiscing about the old days. They feel that this is an insult to Syria’s sovereignty.”


Also, despite what the article claims, I am afraid that Turkey might be just talking the talk; as Syria has been such a close ally to Turkey on many fronts...Also a great sanction against the Syrians might create more tensions between the Turks and the Kurds...a never-ending conflict in itself--as Syria has probably assisted Turkey in the battles against this group of Iraqis.


reply to post by Alxandro
 


What's the circa/date on this map, please? Thanks.


edit on 1-12-2011 by BurningSpearess because: (no reason given)



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