Why Christians don't call their creator Allah ?

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posted on Dec, 1 2011 @ 01:41 AM
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i understand the concept of allah from a christian perspective; but the ideologies of secular beliefs predicate rituals that are different. i often hear christians whos church hymns and rituals include the various prophets repeating thier individual names, and if i see a video on non christian faith conducting ritual where their preferred verbal expression of devotion differs from a different belief in the same fundamental belief structure then different tones, sounds, words, and names are chanted said spoken or thought meditated upon.

this question prosed is like asking a chinese abacus studying child why dont they use more ti-85s when doing calculus in the 3rd grade when viewing videos of american private school education.




posted on Dec, 1 2011 @ 03:55 AM
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reply to post by nenothtu
 


You're ridiculously stubborn.

Aero is spelled different from Air, and yet it is a central component of the word.

So why wold this be any different with the word arrow? I can't believe how you under-emphasize the fact that an arrow is sent through the air. Yes it is drawn through a pulling action via a bow.

Aye... Whatever. I'm right. You're ignorant.

Have a nice day.

And here's some reading material: Metyaphysics and Language

edit on 1-12-2011 by dontreally because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 1 2011 @ 04:17 AM
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Originally posted by dontreally
reply to post by nenothtu
 


You're ridiculously stubborn.


Only when I'm right.



Aero is spelled different from Air, and yet it is a central component of the word.

So why wold this be any different with the word arrow? I can't believe how you under-emphasize the fact that an arrow is sent through the air. Yes it is drawn through a pulling action via a bow.


Deer is spelled different from dear, yet they both share the same pronunciation, with very different meanings. Aero is spelled differently from arrow, yet they both share the same pronunciation, with very different meanings.



Aye... Whatever. I'm right. You're ignorant.


No kidding?


I gave the actual etymology, complete with a link to it, you gave a fanciful one pulled out of your fourth point of contact, with no link.

In the same way, the etymology of "Gad" and "God" are entirely different, from entirely different languages, taking entirely different paths, with very different meanings.

Deal with it.



Have a nice day.


Likewise.



edit on 2011/12/1 by nenothtu because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 1 2011 @ 04:54 AM
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reply to post by nenothtu
 


But I pointed out that aero - which is derived from the Greek aer - meaning "Air" - is a different spelling from aero. And yet there is no contradiction. An aero flies through the air. Additionally, An aeroplane - air wanderer - sounds pretty "mystical". What kind of word is that to be adapted into a modern language? Why not something more straight forward? An aeroplane doesn't "wander". It has an explicit path. A place it starts from and a destination. Thus, whats the logic in choosing that word "planos"?

Anyways, clearly, you will invoke the "specialists" who only show one side of the coin of linguistics. The other side is more 'esoteric' and seldom written or made a large issue of. But nonetheless, it is the basis of all language. Whether Sanskrit, Hebrew, Greek, etc, every language has its own inner logic, in accord with its only metaphysical conception of the cosmos.

I've encountered this subject mostly through my study of political philosophy (analyzing language proves valuable to understanding the differences in approach to sociology) but you will also run into to when reading linguistics, or of course, religious theology....for instance, Jewish writings - which touch on Kabbalah - and the metaphysics of Hebrew - formation of language from word roots. The word roots provide the fundamental metaphysical "core" ideas from which the large, more complex ideas in language develop.

Is English any different? No. That's what I'm attempting to get you to understand and appreciate.

Now, seeing the Hebrew YHVH (the tetragrammaton) and the English God, share the same numerical value (and so you don't undervalue the significance of this. Hebrew doesn't have numerals. Letters = numbers. Thus, an aleph = 1, and so forth. Hebrew words are thus "made" to correspond to other words with an equivalent value, indicating an archetypal connection between both concepts. For instance, love and one, Echad and Ahava, share the value 13. Love can be seen to be a feeling of oneness with the other. Thus, one and love, in the Hebrew conception, are archetypally identical. ) of 26. This hardly can be reduced to coincidence. The name of God in Hebrew, the culture the Christian tradition descends from, having the same value - 26 - as the word 'God' in English????

Since English traces itself back to Hebrew, it is a reasonable postulate to say that the Gnostics (the mentality which underlies Christianity) meant to conflate the concept of "Gad" - Hebrew for "luck" - with the concept of God - YHVH. And indeed, no culture has deprecated God as a figure of luck more then the English.

So, i'm not saying his guess is correct, but nonetheless, it's fun to think about.
edit on 1-12-2011 by dontreally because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 1 2011 @ 06:13 AM
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Allah is taken from an old pagan Moon god "ilah" Arabians used before the birth of Islam. It goes way back to Babylonian times as Bel, Bal or Baal. History has it going even further back in ancient times, the Moon god was in fact in feminine form while the Sun was masculine before other pagens changed to the two - Moon in masculine form and the Sun in feminine form.

Mohammad kept the Moon "entity" and just changed the ilah to allah to ease the burden of conversion amongst his followers to avoid too much confusion.

All Muslims will deny where "allah" originated from however they do carry the Moon cresent as a symbol among many of their flags, buildings, etc:

www.godallah.com...

No Jew (or Hebrew before them) ever used the term or name, nor did Jesus! You won't find the word even mentioned in both Torah or the Christian Bible.

edit on 1-12-2011 by bluemirage5 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 1 2011 @ 06:27 AM
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reply to post by bluemirage5
 




No Jew (or Hebrew before them) ever used the term or name, nor did Jesus! You won't find the word even mentioned in both Torah or the Christian Bible.


Are you sure about that????


In the book of Daniel and Ezra, God is called "Elah"...phonetically akin to Allah.

For instance, in Ezra 5:1, which is written in Aramaic.

וְהִתְנַבִּי חַגַּי נְבִיָּאה, וּזְכַרְיָה בַר-עִדּוֹא נְבִיַּאיָּא, עַל-יְהוּדָיֵא, דִּי בִיהוּד וּבִירוּשְׁלֶם--בְּשֻׁם אֱלָהּ יִשְׂרָאֵל, עֲלֵיהוֹן

B'Shem "EiLaH"...... Aleph, Lamed, Heh. God is called by the term, Allah.

Throughout the book of Daniel this word appears, as in Daniel 2:18

וְרַחֲמִין, לְמִבְעֵא מִן-קֳדָם אֱלָהּ שְׁמַיָּא, עַל-רָזָא

Elah Shamaya - God of Heaven...



The Term Allah appears over and over again. Ilah, even if that was an Arabian term for a moon God, does not mean muslims worship a moon god. The fact that this EXACT word exists in the Aramaic language, and is used to refer to God in the book of Ezra and Daniel, proves that it is God in the sense understood by Jews.

Its ridiculous nonsense to claim Muslims worship the moon, merely because you see the religious icon of the moon on Muslim mosques, etc.

Its a SYMBOL. The moon is the spiritual. It symbolizes Gods presence. Jews bless the new moon every month, does that mean Jews worship the moon? No. Its a symbol for the Shekinah - the same concept Islam alludes to by the moon.



posted on Dec, 1 2011 @ 08:17 AM
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Even if there is that Allah and Ilah connection it is still not the name of God, it might mean God but that is not his name.

(1) Elohim: The plural form of EL, meaning “strong one.” It is used of false gods, but when used of the true God, it is a plural of majesty and intimates the trinity. It is especially used of God’s sovereignty, creative work, mighty work for Israel and in relation to His sovereignty (Isa. 54:5; Jer. 32:27; Gen. 1:1; Isa. 45:18; Deut. 5:23; 8:15; Ps. 68:7).bible.org...


Tetragrammaton, the four-letter name of God, also known as יהוה, or YHWH. "Tetragrammaton" derives from the prefix tetra- ("four") and gramma ("letter", "grapheme"). The Tetragrammaton appears 6,828 times in the Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia edition of the Hebrew Masoretic text. This name is first mentioned in the Book of Genesis (2.4) and in English language bibles is traditionally translated as "The LORD" or as "HASHEM".
en.wikipedia.org...


God is not God's name. That's right. The God of the universe has a name, but "God" isn't it. "God" is what God is. "Human being" is not your name, "Human being" is what you are. You also have a name. Whether it is "Barbara" or "Ken" or "Tom" or "Debbie", you have your own personal name. So does God.
www.yhwh.com...

I still think people will be going in circles here.

It could be a one of those conspiracies where some endtime leader wants to connect all the dots to say all religions are related as one, all gods are the same entity, the world is in turmoil so let us all join forces and if one steps out of line punish them or if one does not join the new found unity bring laws in to eradicate them.

It is very dangerous long term to try and link everyone up to this so called one world religion is not about peace but a takeover of man's descruction and the good forces are holding this back until Christinaity is taken out of the way as described in the Bible.

The next thing is Krishner = Christ.
Jesus was an Alien taken to heaven.
edit on 1-12-2011 by The time lord because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 1 2011 @ 09:11 AM
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I say again: there is no reason why a Christian could not call God "Allah". However, the use of "Allah" is commonly associated with Islam. So you naturally run the risk of confusing uninformed people as to your faith. The difference is in the difference of the religions, not the terminology. Using "Allah" would be no different than using "God", "Yahweh" or "Jehovah". They all mean "God", so there's no reason why you couldn't use one instead of the other(s).



posted on Dec, 1 2011 @ 09:20 AM
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reply to post by dontreally
 


When you use the Hebrew form it gives it a different meaning to that converted to English, therefore no, they are not one of the same. Each hebrew letter has a different meaning.



posted on Dec, 1 2011 @ 09:23 AM
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reply to post by EPH612
 


There is a big difference because "ilah' the Moon god of the Arabian pagans has only changed slightly to allah. And I have'nt been praying to a Moon god all these years.



posted on Dec, 1 2011 @ 10:54 AM
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reply to post by bluemirage5
 

Errr.... you need to read up on history, blue.
Or etymology. Or something.

There was never any moon god called ilah. Wishing it won't make it so. Ilah simply means "god".
Heck, it is there in the Muslim creed:

"La ilah-a il-allah"

No god but God (Allah).

You think it means "No moon-god but Allah"?
edit on 1-12-2011 by babloyi because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 1 2011 @ 12:17 PM
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reply to post by bluemirage5
 





When you use the Hebrew form it gives it a different meaning to that converted to English


I'm not following.....




therefore no, they are not one of the same. Each hebrew letter has a different meaning.


Seriously. what are you talking about?



posted on Dec, 1 2011 @ 12:27 PM
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Originally posted by ManjushriPrajna
What's in a name?

If Aalah is God in Aramaic, then either way should be appropriate. Any name ascribed to God in the Abrahamic religions essentially means the same thing (except for certain characteristics of God, the nature of God remains the same) no matter what name he is called.


Nature of god is beyond and can't be definded by human language. He needs not a name but his presence is more real than ever and eternal. He is the energy that created time,space, all rules and regulations.



posted on Dec, 1 2011 @ 12:35 PM
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reply to post by The time lord
 


You have a false idea about Hebrew, and the significance of the names of God in English.

Elohim אֱלהִים is not some generic word for God and gods. It has the same gematria as HaTeva - nature. The word El אֱל- means "power", as in, Gabriel - "the power of might" - GBR - from Gevurah - "Might", or Rafael - "the power of healing" - from Rafah....

Elohim is the plural, and means "powers", and is often understood in the singular sense as God in his creative mode through nature, and hence, it can often refer to the gods worshiped by the nations. Again, this word, amazingly, has the same numerical value as "nature" - Hateva, which also means a "word" i.e. the word spoken by God - which is creation - as well as "Ark", as in Noahs ark, which is the "world of creation" and order that settles on the infinite chaos (the water)...Hence, the dimensions of the ark allude to the dimensions of creation, as well, amazingly, to the Hebrew word Lashon - tongue. A Teva - a word - is created through the articulation made by the tongue. The human being is a microcosm of creation.

אלוה - the singular of Elohim, is a related noun, and often refers to a god of the nations, or to God.

The term אֱלָהּ , as in a phrase such as אֱלָהּ שְׁמַיָּא , ONLY ever refers to God. True, it might be a 'generic' word meaning God, but its appearance in the Aramaic chapters of Ezra and Daniel are only used in reference to God.

This is a significant term. Elohim, El, Eloah, Elah, are ALL SACRED terms for God. An observant Jew wont even pronounce the name Elohim in its proper form, but will replace the Heh - symbolizing the sacred feminine - with a Kaf, which symbolizes humility. Its bent shape implies a reverence. They do the same with the tetragrammaton - YKVK.



posted on Dec, 1 2011 @ 12:41 PM
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t-etra-grammaton - YKVK.
www.cartoonstock.com... ?

edit on 1-12-2011 by nii900 because: (no reason given)
edit on 1-12-2011 by nii900 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 1 2011 @ 12:50 PM
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Text..."Integrity

All oil blends from Oils That Heal "



posted on Dec, 1 2011 @ 01:01 PM
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Originally posted by babloyi
reply to post by bluemirage5
 

Errr.... you need to read up on history, blue.
Or etymology. Or something.

There was never any moon god called ilah. Wishing it won't make it so. Ilah simply means "god".
Heck, it is there in the Muslim creed:

"La ilah-a il-allah"

No god but God (Allah).

You think it means "No moon-god but Allah"?
edit on 1-12-2011 by babloyi because: (no reason given)


Ahem

al-ilah= the god

Emphasis on THE. Question is, which one?

Crescent symbol is the symbol of Sin of Sinai a pre-islamic moon-deity.

The name of Allah is not Allah, it is Sin of Sinai. Trying to say God's name is God is redundant especially when the hebrew texts say his name is YAH or YHWH or as judeo-christians sometimes refer to him as Yahuwah and Jesus being Yahuwshuwah. the crescent symbol that is on every muslim flag and muslim ruled nation is the symobl of Sin. Now you and every other muslim will deny this, but all you have to do is delve into the history of arabic religions before Islam. Arabic religions being Sumerian, Babylonian and ancient Iranian. You will be diving into Zoarastrianism and some of the other older polythesitic religions. Even christians who call God "God" know his name is not God, but YHWH or as we pronounce it Yahweh (Yah-Wah, some say Yahweh pronouced Yah-way), we also use El-Shaddai "the Almighty". The mere fact that Islam flies the symbol of the crescent moon and star, puts it on their buildings, spray paints it in graffiti on things is a making the bold statement you serve Sin and Sin is not the God of Abraham Isaac and Jacob.
edit on 1-12-2011 by lonewolf19792000 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 1 2011 @ 01:12 PM
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reply to post by lonewolf19792000
 



The name of Allah is not Allah, it is Sin of Sinai.


Where in the Koran does it say Allahs name is "Sin"?

Ever read up on what God does in the Koran?

Allah created everything.... chose Abraham and favored his progeny.....inspired the prophets....punished Sodom and Gomorrah....sent Jesus to be born of a virgin etc etc etc.

All of which match what the bible says about God.



posted on Dec, 1 2011 @ 01:37 PM
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Originally posted by mike_trivisonno
reply to post by ManjushriPrajna
 


Islam is NOT related to Christianity or Judaism.

Islam worships the Allah deity better known Baal the Moon God. Islam does not worship the god of the Bible.

Islam is NOT an an "abrahamic" faith. Islam was invented by Mohammed after begin rejected by the Jews and Christians in pre-Islamic Arabia.


will that not true
Allah not the moon God Or ba'al or any Idol that were around ka'aba before Islam .
first you must know the MOON god called "Hubal" and it was one of 360 idol's around ka'aba ..
and Also referring to the Quran, it is clearly stated the distinction between Allah and the moon.

Allah said in the Quran : " "And from among His Signs are the night and the day, and the sun and the moon. Do not bow down (prostrate) to the sun nor to the moon, but only bow down (prostrate) to "Allah" Who created them, if you (really) worship Him."

and even Arabs pagan when they were worship the Idols they recognized in one God and he was Allah and he was greater then the Idols and the Idol just Means.

Allah said in the holy Quran :
If you were to ask them: "Who has created the heavens and the earth and subjected the sun and the moon?" They will surely reply: "Allâh." How then are they deviating (as polytheists and disbelievers)?
This is very clear, they realize that God is the Creator of the moon, and they realize the differentiate between Allah and the rest of the Idol's.

and let us see what Quran said about ba'al
Allah said
"Will you call upon Ba'l (a well known idol of his nation whom they used to worship) and forsake the Best of creators,Allâh, your Lord and the Lord of your forefathers..

So the Interesting thing is , Why you come with this dis info and lie about Islam ?



posted on Dec, 1 2011 @ 01:37 PM
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reply to post by lonewolf19792000
 


You people really don't have any spiritual insight.

The moon is a SYMBOL. A SYMBOL.

Jews Bless the moon every month! Does that mean they worship the moon? Why don't you ask a religious Jew what the esoteric/metaphysical/kabbalistic significance of that action is??

The moon is the spiritual. The Sun is seen as God, whereas the moon is his reflection into created reality. Hence, anyone who is spiritual minded, will find the nighttime to be a period of increased spirituality, increased awareness of the divine. This is because of the nature of night, of the nature of the moon.

The symbol of the moon in Islam simply refers to the presence of God made present through Islam. It does not refer to a worship of the moon, anymore then a menorah equals a worship of a candelabrum. They are SYMBOLS.

It is ridiculous how many of you guys think you know what you're talking about, but are completely and utterly off the mark.





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