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U.S. Military Legacy Rubs Off on Iraqi Youth

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posted on Nov, 27 2011 @ 07:50 AM
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BAGHDAD -- After more than eight years in Iraq, the departing American military's legacy includes a fledgling democracy, bitter memories of war, and for the nation's youth, rap music, tattoos and slang.



I don't know about you.. I mean, I'm fine with other nations learning American culture as we do about others. But this isn't quite what I would have in mind. I looks more like consumerism.


So after years of watching U.S. soldiers on patrol, it's inevitable that hip-hop styles, tough-guy mannerisms and slangy English patter would catch on with young Iraqis.

I'm sure there are some in the military that came from this background. But I don't think it is what caused the influence. I don't see cowboy hats and boots also. Although, I'm not into either but I know a lot more military that are into country.


To many of their fellow Iraqis, the habits appear weird, if not downright offensive. But to the youths, it is a vital part of their pursuit of the American dream as they imagine it to be.

I think they are in for a big disappointment if they think this is how you "get somewhere" in this world.
But that's my opinion and I welcome yours..


www.foxnews.com...
edit on 27-11-2011 by Corruptedstructure because: forgot link




posted on Nov, 27 2011 @ 08:06 AM
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reply to post by Corruptedstructure
 


sounds like propaganda from the american propaganda arm of the pentagon



posted on Nov, 27 2011 @ 08:51 AM
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What a load of crap. They are over there in army fatigues (sp?) So where does the "ghetto" come in?



posted on Nov, 27 2011 @ 09:11 AM
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reply to post by Corruptedstructure
 


Unfortunately our Democracy comes at a price and creates a social-economic structure of Haves and Have Nots....

exactly as we currently have in the USA and now we have created in Iraq.

From the Iraqi's youth's perspectives they have much more in common with American inner city youth AND their music vs the ideals portrayed by "Country" music.

For one they don't live in the country but live in squalor in what are essentially slums engulfed in violence.
Also Similar to that in which the original creators of RAP music originated from.

From the article this Iraqi youth eloquently reveals this ...



"Lil Czar" Mohammed, a Shiite Muslim, says he was introduced to American culture by a Christian friend, ....Meanwhile, he said, he is trying to record a rap song in Arabic and English. "It is about our situation. About no jobs for us."


So as with the inner city youth of America whom also have no jobs AND no real hope of a future.

Just as the inner city youth of America wouldn't be able to relate or understand "Country" living and/or it's music we have created the same situation of standards of living in Iraq.

For What exactly IS there to be joyous about living in Iraq at the moment ?





posted on Nov, 27 2011 @ 09:31 AM
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reply to post by Corruptedstructure
 





BAGHDAD -- After more than eight years in Iraq, the departing American military's legacy includes a fledgling democracy, bitter memories of war, and for the nation's youth, rap music, tattoos and slang.


Oh media who said the ng American military is leaving the military bases will still be open.

Typical how your source is FOX news
a Pro military newsnet.
edit on 27-11-2011 by Agent_USA_Supporter because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 27 2011 @ 09:48 AM
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reply to post by Corruptedstructure
 

Choice is american. These youth and their parents are choosing to do the wrong thing.

It's a bitter irony that the flipside of freedom is a bad choice and yet it's also a sign iraqi's are adopting some american culture. Hopefully, with time, they'll adopt the more positive aspects.
edit on 27-11-2011 by jonnywhite because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 27 2011 @ 01:28 PM
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I can somewhat relate to what these Iraqi kids are idolizing with the American Military.

My Dad who is German was 9 years old when WWII ended was as most Germans was starving and had an Uncle who knew where the American GI's had setup motorpool/transport camps nearby.

The GI's who were driving supplies thru Germany were primarily Black and my Dad tells me the story of how if he could muster up the courage ask they'd give him their Hershey Bar and can of Carnation milk out of their C-Rations.

He always loved the American GIs for this because he was starving of hunger and that Hershey Bar followed by the can of milk never tasted so good to a starving kid.

So much that He even later immigrated to the US and became a US Army GI himself....

So I can somewhat relate to what the Iraqis are going through in post war Iraq....as well as their idolizing of Americans GIs.

My Dad experienced the same in post war Germany.

Peace



posted on Nov, 27 2011 @ 01:34 PM
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reply to post by Corruptedstructure
 



I don't know about you.. I mean, I'm fine with other nations learning American culture as we do about others. But this isn't quite what I would have in mind. I looks more like consumerism.


Here is a typical experience of Iraqi children singing on the streets.


Now it seems they are going to all be singing along to this.



Personally I really don't know which one I would pick to tell you the truth.



posted on Nov, 27 2011 @ 01:54 PM
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reply to post by wiredamerican
 


You got my main point exactly!

Even though I would be interested in what those kids were singing about. No help on the youtube comments either.
But, I do get with your last statement!



posted on Nov, 27 2011 @ 02:01 PM
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reply to post by Corruptedstructure
 


It probably is consumerism. What better way to pacify a nation than with alcohol, porn, air conditioning, and fast food? I mean seriously, what is there to fight about when you have those 4 things going for you?

This is the danger the ultra-religious are the most concerned about! It isn't out missiles, it is our culture that they fear.



posted on Nov, 27 2011 @ 03:23 PM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 


And some that live around it fear. The "crazy" ones.



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