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We must learn to eat again,just like babies....but can we?Is it Gluten Free?

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posted on Nov, 19 2011 @ 12:18 AM
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I don't know how many of you can have a healthy diet but with the genetically modified food this days is very hard to choose,so we can make this easier by gluten free diet!


TextYES Foods made from grains (and grain-like plants) that do notcontain harmful gluten, including: Corn in all forms (corn flour, corn meal, grits,etc.). Rice in all forms (white, brown, basmati and enriched rice). Also amaranth, buckwheat (kasha), Montina, millet, quinoa, teff, sorghum and soy. The following ingredients: Annatto, glucose syrup, lecithin, maltodextrin (even when it is made from wheat), oat gum, plain spices, silicon dioxide, starch, food starch and vinegar (only malt vinegar might contain gluten). Also citric, lactic and malic acids as well as sucrose, dextrose and lactose; and these baking products: arrowroot, cornstarch, guar and xanthan gums, tapioca four or starch, potato starch flour and potato starch, vanilla. The following foods: Milk, butter, margarine, real cheese, plain yogurt and vegetable oils including canola. Plain fruits, vegetables, (fresh, frozen and canned), meat, seafood, eggs, nuts, beans and legumes and flours made from them. Distilled vinegar is gluten free. (See malt vinegar under NO below). Distilled alcoholic beverages are gluten free because distillation effectively removes gluten from wheat. They are not gluten free if gluten-containing ingredients are added after distillation, but this rarely, if ever, happens. Mono and diglycerides are fats and are gluten free. Spices are gluten free. If there is no ingredient list on the container, it contains only the pure spice noted on the label. NO Wheat in all forms including spelt, kamut, triticale (a combination of wheat and rye), durum, einkorn, farina, semolina, cake flour, matzo (or matzah) and couscous. Ingredients with "wheat" in the name including wheat starch, modified wheat starch, hydrolyzed wheat protein and pregelatinized wheat protein. Buckwheat, which is gluten free, is an exception. Barley and malt, which is usually made from barley, malt syrup, malt extract, malt flavoring and malt vinegar. Rye Breaded or floured meat, poultry, seafood and vegetables. Also meat, poultry and vegetables when they have a sauce or marinade that contains gluten, such as soy and teriyaki sauces. Licorice, imitation crab meat, beer, most is fermented from barley. (Specialty gluten-free beer is available from several companies.) MAYBE Dextrin can be made from wheat, which would be noted on the label, and would not be gluten free. Flavorings are usually gluten free, but in rare instances can contain wheat or barley. By law, wheat would have to be labeled. Barley is usually called malt flavoring. In extremely rare instances, neither barley nor malt is specified in a flavoring. Modified food starch is gluten free, except when wheat is noted on the label, either as "modified wheat starch," modified starch (wheat) or if the Contains statement at the end of the ingredients list includes wheat. Oats used to be considered unsafe, but recent research has shown that a moderate amount of special pure oats is safe for most celiacs. Several companies produce oats specifically for the GF market. They are labeled gluten free. Pharmaceuticals can contain gluten, although most are gluten free. Check with the pharmaceutical company, especially if you take the medication on a continuing basis. Processed cheese (spray cheese, for example) may contain gluten. Real cheese is gluten free. Seasonings and seasoning mixes could contain gluten. Wheat will be noted on the label as required by law. Soy Sauce is usually fermented from wheat. However, some brands don't include wheat and are gluten free. Read the label to be sure. Special Cases Caramel color is almost always made from corn, but it can be made from malt syrup. However, in more than 10 years, we have not been able to find a single instance of a caramel color produced this way. Companies in North America say they use corn. You can consider caramel color GF. Hydrolyzed vegetable protein is a phrase that under federal regulation should not be used on a food label. Food processors have to identify the "vegetable." So you might read "hydrolyzed wheat protein," which would not be gluten free, or "hydrolyzed soy protein," which is gluten free.
source(www.glutenfreeliving.com...




posted on Nov, 19 2011 @ 12:23 AM
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reply to post by diamondsmith
 


Do kittens have gluten?

Nah in all seriousness if people actually ate healthy and not like pigs we would see a dramatic drop in almost all diseases.. I try to eat healthy but my biggest concern is sodium.
s&f for you
edit on 19-11-2011 by WakeUpRiseUp because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 19 2011 @ 12:25 AM
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Originally posted by WakeUpRiseUp
reply to post by diamondsmith
 


Do kittens have gluten?

Nah in all seriousness if people actually ate healthy and not like pigs we would see a dramatic drop in almost all diseases.. I try to eat healthy but my biggest concern is sodium.
s&f for you
edit on 19-11-2011 by WakeUpRiseUp because: (no reason given)
SODIUM INTAKE



Recommended daily dietary intake of sodium (Australia):
Infants:
Children:

Adults:

6-25 millimoles
14-100 millimoles

40-100 millimoles

0.1-0.6 grams
0.3-2.3 grams

0.9-2.3 grams



posted on Nov, 19 2011 @ 12:32 AM
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It is hard to eat healthy these days with all the crap that directly or indirectly ends up in Our food. I really wish I had better self control when it comes to eating right.

To be honest I think that for man to really progress we should stop being so reliant on meat. (I am in no way a vege and don't see myself giving it up any time soon, but...) the mass farming and production of meat is so inefficient and in many cases these days very cruel.

If ony we could start relying on Veges and fruit rather than meat as our main diet we would all be better off. Anyway that is my two cents.
edit on 19-11-2011 by homeslice because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 19 2011 @ 12:36 AM
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reply to post by diamondsmith
 


I have always believed that the RDI for sodium has always been hugely overstated. Although I dont have the millions to do research, I would stake my life on the fact if everyone reduced sodium intake by somwhere around 40-70% we would see a gigantic reduction in diseases; be that physical and probably mental.

edit on 19-11-2011 by WakeUpRiseUp because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 19 2011 @ 12:47 AM
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reply to post by diamondsmith
 


More important than watching what has which evil additive, Do not eat anything from a box, can or bag whenever possible.
This goes for prepared foods as well, subway, McDeath, pizzas, Red Lobster, Hooters, Etc.
Sodas, oh sodas, when I do on occasion I buy the real sugar, retro or mexican made sodas, yes I know diabetic but I do not do abomination fake sweetners and HFCS is much worse than saccarine or sugar together.
I am a diabetic and between that and some accidents and working through them without thinking to recover, I gave my wife a scare as I was in some pretty bad shape.
So upon retirement I started doing the shopping and cooking.
I buy whole foods and cook real meals.
Last night we had chicken and dumplings, it took me a few hours working at a broken pace, here and there as I added.
Total of about maybe half hour if you added it all together.
Best thing of all, it tasted awesome.
I have become a foody I have been told.
I can do dern near everything homemade, except good croissants...

Personally, I believe I got the kitchen version of the Chuck Norris gene.



posted on Nov, 19 2011 @ 01:44 AM
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Sometimes in this harsh world the very thing that will cheer me up at the end of the day is a filling bacon cheeseburger dinner followed by a satisfying cigarette. It isn't the best thing for me, but I see benefit in occasionally enjoying life.

Also, I eat magic beans(placebo) every morning that give me long life. We'll see who lives longer.



posted on Nov, 20 2011 @ 04:52 AM
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Originally posted by MeesterB
Sometimes in this harsh world the very thing that will cheer me up at the end of the day is a filling bacon cheeseburger dinner followed by a satisfying cigarette. It isn't the best thing for me, but I see benefit in occasionally enjoying life.

Also, I eat magic beans(placebo) every morning that give me long life. We'll see who lives longer.
Worst Fast Food Chicken Meal

Chicken Slects Premium Breast Strips from McDonald's (5 pieces) with creamy ranch sauce



830 calories
55g fat (4.5g trans fat)
48g carbs

The only thing "premium" about these strips is the caloric price you pay. Add a large fries and regular soda and this seemingly innocuous chicken meal tops out at 1,710 calories.



posted on Nov, 20 2011 @ 07:24 AM
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I'm gluten intolerant and I can't eat anything with oats or rice at all. Also, there is an idea floating around out there that the problem isn't actually the gluten. It might not actually be that at all. If I have something with wheat starch, though that claims to be gluten-free, I will have precisely the same reaction as if I had eaten wheat.

I have a lot of experience with food sensitivities. I can't eat anything with grains or their derivatives, no citric acid (citrus, tomato, pineapple, mango, but even right down to lettuces), no soy at all, nothing with peanuts at all (wrecks my liver). Ah, yes. And no eggs.

Functionally, this leaves me almost nothing that I *can* eat without experiencing some reaction. But what I started doing some years ago was to eat just one food per meal for the duration of its season. For example, at this time of year I would eat only apples. I could eat as much as I wanted, whenever I wanted, but it could be only apples. If I ate something else during the day, say a soup, it could have no more than four ingredients (including water and salt or any other flavoring agents) because I have to keep things simple for my digestion to deal with. In total, I kept to five food items per day. I did this for a couple of years. I lost all the fat that had accumulated in my desk job and my body cleaned itself out. Now I can, on occasion, eat a slice of cake (homemade from scratch - by me) without any sort of discomfort. But that's only for special occasions, and that is as it should be. Otherwise, I keep to my food purity theme. I can eat things with citric acid now, but not in excess. I can eat sunchokes raw but I would never attempt lemon meringue pie. I can even eat lemon, but complicated foods are poison for people with sensitivities.

Did I mention that I used to do professional pastry? Yeah, well, now I'm working on recreating desserts so that this "simplicity" theme can be followed. No more wheat-based desserts. They need to be remade into something that can be equally a dessert or a (healthful) snack/pick-me-up or even a medicine, as needs be.

We have a lot of room to improve our food selection and preparation. To be really effective, we truly do need to learn to eat again, from the bottom up. Our current menus are pure poison.



posted on Nov, 20 2011 @ 07:42 AM
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reply to post by CosmicEgg
 
What about fish food?



posted on Nov, 20 2011 @ 07:47 AM
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reply to post by diamondsmith
 


Do you mean fish and seafood? I can eat those, but not in quantities. I don't eat much from the animal kingdom because it always makes me feel a little ill. No ethical issue though. I think it has more to do with what they eat out there in their worlds.

Living in Finland, we do tend to eat more fish than in the US. For a long time it was a major part of our diet. Now I just have to stick to what doesn't hurt me. Too much of anything isn't good.



posted on Nov, 21 2011 @ 02:53 AM
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reply to post by CosmicEgg
 
White fish meat is the best diet sometimes,our body always learn to adapt to new conditions and in time will accept what we give,everything is in the mind who control our body,don't let the body control the mind!



posted on Nov, 21 2011 @ 03:11 AM
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reply to post by diamondsmith
 


No, you've got that the wrong way 'round. It's "don't let the mind control the body" in the case of food. Your body tells you what it needs. Your mind is polluted with "information" dosed in quantity by nutritionists and doctors who know sweet F. A. about the body and its needs.

Too much protein is a bad idea. Too much animal protein is a bad idea. Stick to what your body tells you it needs at any given moment. Start cleansing and detoxing with local foods in season, one at a time. Literally, one at a time. Give your body a good fast now and then. Food isn't so much a fuel source, it's medicine. Treat it accordingly and with great respect.

Foods have energies that medical science hasn't even got a whiff of yet. THAT'S the stuff that is important to our well-being. Calories and vitamins and all the rest that science registers are just tangibles. Our food is so poor in those presently that it's virtually worthless. Go eat some weeds next spring and summer. Pluck something from the earth and eat it slowly, savor it. It is literally the best nutrition going. And it's free, like all the best things in life.



posted on Nov, 23 2011 @ 04:40 AM
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TextGluten is a protein found in grains including wheat, rye, oats and barley. Patients with Coeliac disease are sensitive to gluten which damages the lining of the small bowel. This damage affects the absorption of food and can lead to symptoms including weight loss, diarrhoea, iron and folic acid deficiency. A gluten free diet is the only long term treatment for Coeliac disease. Complete removal of gluten from the diet allows the gut to recover to normal over a period of time. Even small amounts of gluten are enough to prevent recovery or cause further damage. Obvious symptoms or damage may not occur at the time of consumption. It is important to include a wide variety of gluten free cereal products in a Gluten Free diet. This can be as simple as adding small amounts of soy, potato flour or rice bran to a dish. These are important sources of fibre, B group vitamins, zinc and increase the variety of the diet. Food Labelling and Gluten Foods may be gluten free either by ingredient - ie they contain only gluten free ingredients, or those foods which are labelled "gluten free". The Australian Standard of Gluten Free foods1 now requires that foods labelled as “Gluten Free” contain no detectable gluten using a sensitive assay. There are ingredients that are wheat derived but are considered gluten free because no gluten remains after processing and these wheat glucose syrup, and caramel. It is essential that all food labels be rechecked regularly since the composition may change.
link(www.gastro.net.au...



posted on Nov, 23 2011 @ 07:40 AM
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reply to post by diamondsmith
 


What's your point? You're just putting text from the site there. Do you have any experience with food sensitivities? Or is that site the best info you have? I've lived with this my entire life. I believe my experience carries a lot more weight than that thin site does. It's damned hard to live totally gluten-free. The point I'm trying to get across to you is that medical science does not understand foods. The don't understand our bodies. They don't understand that when you have one food sensitivity, it can cause all manner of things to happen in the body that snowball into others.

Your simplistic view is not helping anyone learn about this. That site is far from comprehensive on the subject.



posted on Nov, 23 2011 @ 02:15 PM
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I have celiacs, I can not eat gluten at all. After doing research some of my non celiac family members went gluten free. There health has dramatically improved. I am a firm believer that every one has different nutritional needs and no one specific diet will work for every one. For the person who said to much protein is bad, I personally need lot's of protein to feel good.



posted on Nov, 24 2011 @ 01:45 AM
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Originally posted by CosmicEgg
reply to post by diamondsmith
 


What's your point? You're just putting text from the site there. Do you have any experience with food sensitivities? Or is that site the best info you have? I've lived with this my entire life. I believe my experience carries a lot more weight than that thin site does. It's damned hard to live totally gluten-free. The point I'm trying to get across to you is that medical science does not understand foods. The don't understand our bodies. They don't understand that when you have one food sensitivity, it can cause all manner of things to happen in the body that snowball into others.

Your simplistic view is not helping anyone learn about this. That site is far from comprehensive on the subject.
Sorry man I didn't mean no harm please forgive me....just try to help!



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