The Garamantes are refound in the South-West Sahara

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posted on Nov, 18 2011 @ 06:20 PM
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"Lost" Fortresses of Sahara Revealed by Satellites

The link




Well these guys were never actually lost just not overly studied; the ten year Libyan-Chad war chilled investigations in that area when Libyan's made the area off limits. At some point recently, but before the civil war they lifted that restriction.


Summary of the Garamentes culture



They appear in the written record for the first time in the 5th century BC. According to Herodotus, they were "a very great nation" who herded cattle, farmed dates, and hunted the "Ethiopian Troglodytes", or "cave-dwellers" who lived in the desert, from four-horse chariots. According to Pliny the Elder, Romans eventually grew tired of Garamantian raiding and Lucius Cornelius Balbus captured 15 of their settlements in 19 BC.

The decline of the Garamantian culture may have been connected to worsening climatic conditions, or overuse of water resources. What is desert today was once fairly good agricultural land and was enhanced through the Garmantian irrigation system 1,500 years ago.


From the wiki




posted on Nov, 18 2011 @ 06:44 PM
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I think I'm more interested in the Ethiopian Troglodytes!!!

seriously ..they hunted 'cavemen" from chariots???



now therein lies a tale



posted on Nov, 18 2011 @ 07:14 PM
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This is really interesting stuff, thanks for the heads up OP.

You forgot to link the wiki so I dug it up, it's fairly limited in scope but it appears there is a fairly robust amount of leads in the 'resources' section that are worth looking into.

Garamantes wiki

Check this resource out :
Libya's forgotten desert kingdom

Here is another one:
Whispers in the sand



posted on Nov, 18 2011 @ 07:17 PM
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This civilization was known to the Greeks and Romans as Garamantes. What they called themselves we don’t know. Indeed, the Garamantians are little more than a hazy question mark hanging over history. They flourished brilliantly, slipped away into total obscurity, and are only now beginning to be rediscovered. Yet they left behind the ruins of eight large towns (only three exacavated ) thousands of kilometres from the nearest source of water, some 100,000 tombs, intriguing miniature pyramids and hundreds of kilometres of underground canals and tunnels. In the heart of the Sahara, it is clear that a great civilization bloomed. Who were these people?



Seven thousand years ago, the Sahara was a very different place. Cave paintings found in the middle of the desert show rivers and lakes, crowded with ostriches, elephants and hippopotamuses, and cavemen hunting them. Much of what is desert now was fertile country then. Some of these cave paintings, discovered in 1958, show a new people, riding in Roman or Egyptian style chariots, making war on the hunter-gatherers. These, we can guess, were the Garamantians. Where they came from (South from the Mediterranean? West from Sudan ?) we don’t know.


That is from the "Whispers" link in my post above this one.
Very fascinating reading.



posted on Nov, 19 2011 @ 11:31 AM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


whats up hanslune

thanks for the op....libyas got alot to show the world,

have you ever heard of the SAITES....they ruled northern egypted for a short period, in the 26th dynasty.
in between the ku#e rulers and the persians.

the era was....525 bc......i know that siates are libyans....
could these people be the 26th dynasty pharaohs???

let me know
peace



posted on Nov, 19 2011 @ 11:37 AM
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Originally posted by thePharaoh
reply to post by Hanslune
 


whats up hanslune

thanks for the op....libyas got alot to show the world,

have you ever heard of the SAITES....they ruled northern egypted for a short period, in the 26th dynasty.
in between the ku#e rulers and the persians.

the era was....525 bc......i know that siates are libyans....
could these people be the 26th dynasty pharaohs???

let me know
peace


Howdy, I think you may mean the Twenty-third Dynasty, which is Libyan. The 26th appears to have been 'native' but they did have assistance from the kingdom of Lydia



posted on Nov, 19 2011 @ 11:44 AM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


ok
i realise that both tanites and liyans ruled in the 23rd dynasty
the 22nd dynasty had a few pharaohs from liyba as well

i understand that they filled a void in the north...
left by warring upper egypt, with the asiatica.

if that is the case...than these libyans ar older than, cleoplatra, alelxander the great, older than darius
as a matter of fact its about 100 yrs after ramsees 11th.

amazing!

thanx op...now wheres my gold!!
edit on 19-11-2011 by thePharaoh because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 19 2011 @ 11:47 AM
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Would make a nice addition to your other thread, Archaeology discoveries that rewrote history, not only for the discovery but the means used - satellite imagery.

Do you know if the downfall of Gaddafi played a role in this information coming out? It mentions a 'cash-strapped' Heritage foundation struggling to conduct field research, does this mean the satellite survey identified potential archeological sites, and the survey's were put on ice until the removal of Gaddafi and access could be obtained to these areas? (This was the case in Iraq under Hussein and is still the case in Lebanon where Hamas has control).



posted on Nov, 19 2011 @ 11:53 AM
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Originally posted by Blackmarketeer
Would make a nice addition to your other thread, Archaeology discoveries that rewrote history, not only for the discovery but the means used - satellite imagery.

Do you know if the downfall of Gaddafi played a role in this information coming out? It mentions a 'cash-strapped' Heritage foundation struggling to conduct field research, does this mean the satellite survey identified potential archeological sites, and the survey's were put on ice until the removal of Gaddafi and access could be obtained to these areas? (This was the case in Iraq under Hussein and is still the case in Lebanon where Hamas has control).


Don't know, we'd need to find the original site reports but I would suspect this occurred before the revolution as most research in the Sahara takes place during the winter months.

Earlier study on the Fezzan

There are other articles outlined in Google Scholar for David Mattingly, one of the original study group

Dm appears to be concerned with that area of the world and its history there are a number of articles on his work unfortunately most appear to be at pay sites
edit on 19/11/11 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 19 2011 @ 12:24 PM
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reply to post by Blackmarketeer
 



Do you know if the downfall of Gaddafi played a role in this information coming out? It mentions a 'cash-strapped' Heritage foundation struggling to conduct field research, does this mean the satellite survey identified potential archeological sites, and the survey's were put on ice until the removal of Gaddafi and access could be obtained to these areas? (This was the case in Iraq under Hussein and is still the case in Lebanon where Hamas has control).




Perhaps some of those old canals have been put back to use through the underground water projects?

Archeological sites may have been restricted by Libya during construction.

Maybe the were afraid of foreign exploitations?

I'm sure many old sites were discovered or were known to exist while building the water project.

en.wikipedia.org...

maybe someone can compare maps ..... the project vs old canals?

edit on Nov-19-2011 by xuenchen because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 19 2011 @ 03:19 PM
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reply to post by xuenchen
 





The red circle in the present area of Algeria, Tunisia and Libya was the kingdom of the Garamentes.

Phrase IV of the water project was in that area and your idea that it might have been helpful in the discovery is possible.

We'll probably get the full story in 12-18 months when a complete report is given out or one of the principles publishes a book.

Interestingly I came across the Garamentes when researching the end of the Mamelukes - who driven from Egypt by Napoleon fled into the Fezzan where after a generation they disappeared from history. There last mention was in a journal by a British/German explorer headed towards Timbucktoo
edit on 19/11/11 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 20 2011 @ 08:58 AM
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mate iv been looking at the gamantes....i have a good site for info. below



walid al arab

www.saudiaramcoworld.com...

at one point i read that they are libyans, founded cities in greece, ruled northern egypt for many years, some sites say they are black??

now the main point:

when upper egypt was fighting the asiatics....
the libyans filled the void
when the perisans broke through tanis and absorbed north egypt
many libyans defected to upper egypt.

the nubians today have a sect known as "walid al arab"...children of the arabs.
they are a spitting image of the nubians...but have libyan decendants
it is known that libyans settlled in the nubian stronghold of the south after taharaqs battle in tanis

peace



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 05:54 AM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


I have just been educating myself about the Garamantes kingdom and society and thought i would check ATS to see if there is any extra info. Should have known you would have already got onto this Hanslune!


One thing struck me as a bit odd though, (possibly odd is the wrong word) - has anyone noticed the resemblance between the Garamantes burial pyramids and the Djoser pyramid (oldest Egyptian pyramid)? Seems strange that a culture that is supposedly 500 BC to 700AD would base some burial styles on the oldest style of Egyptian pyramid, rather than the contemporary versions they would have been more aware of. Possibly a clue that both styles copied from something older? Clearly just speculation and no one else may see it!



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 09:31 AM
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Originally posted by Flavian
reply to post by Hanslune
 



One thing struck me as a bit odd though, (possibly odd is the wrong word) - has anyone noticed the resemblance between the Garamantes burial pyramids and the Djoser pyramid (oldest Egyptian pyramid)? Seems strange that a culture that is supposedly 500 BC to 700AD would base some burial styles on the oldest style of Egyptian pyramid, rather than the contemporary versions they would have been more aware of. Possibly a clue that both styles copied from something older? Clearly just speculation and no one else may see it!


Do you have an image of the burial pyramid?

I would suggest that the Garamantes could have seen the excisting Djoser pyramid and been inspired, or lacking the skills to build a true pyramid made the earlier, easier to make version......or they just came up with the idea themselves



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 09:53 AM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


Hi Hanslune,

I do not know how to embed pics (red face showing) but i have posted a link to the only pics i could find online - i have seen others whilst working in Libya.

The link isn't the best example to be honest though.......Pyramids

Maybe it is something very simple like step pyramids are a simple building style......rather than anything else. Like i mentioned, it was just something that occurred to me rather than something with any historical basis.

Like you do when your get a bit carried away with a thought, i started thinking if there is a precursor it would be buried under the sand and not likely to be spotted anyway.

Probably nothing but an over active imagination!



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 10:33 AM
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reply to post by Flavian
 


Go to tools then ats uploads (to upload an image), then once up, click on it and copy the link to it

Paste here




These look reconstructed but they don't look particularly Egyptian or Nubian, rather a style of their own, or more correctly another interpretation of the easiest way to make a tall structure out of rock or mud brick





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