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USMC and the War on Terrorism

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posted on Sep, 4 2004 @ 07:09 PM
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Originally posted by Tripnastic
Anyway, thats how I feel about that, and as a side note, whoever does Marine PR and develops their commercials is a genius.


I will never have anything but the highest respect for the best army in the world--the United States Army. The Marine Corps' best PR agency is the vast number of Marines who go about their daily lives in virtually every city and town in America. The message is always loud and clear. "We are different because of the Corps and we are proud of that difference."


[edit on 04/9/4 by GradyPhilpott]




posted on Sep, 4 2004 @ 07:13 PM
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Originally posted by sweatmonicaIdo
I can't wait to be a Marine Corps officer in four years!


Congratulations, you are setting yourself an incredibly high goal. Good luck.



posted on Sep, 4 2004 @ 07:39 PM
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keholmes,

Thanks. I wanted to be part of the Army, but now I want to be a Marine. I had a life-changing experience, and it was probably the best thing that a person could've ever done for me.

I owe it all to Staff Sergeant Trent and Staff Sergeant Machado. They were the ones who pointed me in the right direction.



posted on Sep, 4 2004 @ 07:42 PM
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GradyPhilpott,

Nice quotes, I loved each of them!


Whilst our young warriors are out there i will support them our soldiers/sailors/airmen, not Bush and Blair.


Not to burst your bubble, but Grady, a lot of people who say the above truly do support the troops. Just because someone doesn't like the guy who calls the shots or war doesn't mean they hate the troops.

I'm one of them. I don't like Bush. But guess what, I love out servicemen and women and I am thankful for what they have done. Not because it's made us safer or anything, but the fact that they were willing to do the things most people do not have the guts to do.

There's an illuminating lesson for you. We don't have to like the politician or the situation to support the troops. The two don't go hand-in-hand.



posted on Sep, 4 2004 @ 07:44 PM
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Originally posted by sweatmonicaIdoI can't wait to be a Marine Corps officer in four years!


Are you in college, sweat? Tell us a little about yourself and your life changing experience and maybe some links to some relevant information. We Marines love to talk about all aspects of our Corps.



posted on Sep, 4 2004 @ 07:47 PM
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Here's a great site regarding the Corps and the War on Terrorism. It seems to have it all, the good, the bad, and the ugly.

www.usmchq.com...



posted on Sep, 4 2004 @ 07:50 PM
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Originally posted by GradyPhilpott

Originally posted by taibunsuu
The Marines are not ahead of the Army in terms of training and tactics.


Wow! The Army has watered down every element of their training to meet the new PC requirements.


Actually you're right, I was just trying to find the essence of it without sounding too biased and I think Espirit de Corps is a huge part of it. Well, I am biased. # the Army.



posted on Sep, 4 2004 @ 07:52 PM
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Originally posted by sweatmonicaIdo
There's an illuminating lesson for you. We don't have to like the politician or the situation to support the troops. The two don't go hand-in-hand.


Wait till all the cards on on the table, sweat. I hate to see you go through the things we Vietnam veterans went through, but I'm afraid history is going to repeat itself. And also, I understand what you are trying to say, but when you have seen the situation from a little different perspective you will have a better understanding of what I am trying to say. Remember, I believed as you do once myself.



posted on Sep, 4 2004 @ 08:03 PM
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Originally posted by GradyPhilpott

Originally posted by sweatmonicaIdo
There's an illuminating lesson for you. We don't have to like the politician or the situation to support the troops. The two don't go hand-in-hand.


Wait till all the cards on on the table, sweat. I hate to see you go through the things we Vietnam veterans went through, but I'm afraid history is going to repeat itself. And also, I understand what you are trying to say, but when you have seen the situation from a little different perspective you will have a better understanding of what I am trying to say. Remember, I believed as you do once myself.


Politicians will sell troops down river in a heartbeat no matter if they're Repub or Dem. I hope for best in Iraq and protested war before it started. Now that it's going we should make every effort to achieve war aims. Only problem is my faith in capabilities of US troops is about 1000 times stronger than my faith in any politician, repub or dem.



posted on Sep, 4 2004 @ 08:04 PM
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Here's an interesting story of the Corps only permenantly forward-based MEU. They were very recently deployed to assist in Operation Iraqi Freedom. I note that this unit predates my service by four months. That's getting to be a pretty long time for a "permenantly forward-based MEU."


www.globalsecurity.org...


In mid-August 2004 the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, currently located in Okinawa, Japan, received deployment orders to the Central Command area of responsibility to support Operation Iraqi Freedom. For operational reasons, specific dates for troop movements are not releasable. The 2,000-member 31st MEU loaded on the amphibious assault ships USS Essex, USS Juneau and USS Harpers Ferry, which left Okinawa by the end of August.

The 31st MEU is expected to return to Okinawa once it is mission complete. While it is not possible to provide a specific date for the unit's return, typical Marine deployments last from four to seven months. The unit will remain deployed as long as needed to best support Central Command.

The 31st MEU's deployment to the Central Command's area of responsibility is part of the Marine Corps commitment to security and stability all around the world as we fight the Global War on Terrorism.

The U.S. remains fully committed to Treaty of Mutual Cooperation and Security with Japan, and to ensuring the security and stability of the Asia-Pacific region. U.S. Pacific Command maintains the capability to provide a prudent deterrent posture in the Western Pacific. The U.S. military presence in the Asia-Pacific region demonstrates the U.S. commitment to the defense of Japan, as well as security and stability in the region.



[edit on 04/9/4 by GradyPhilpott]


GD

posted on Sep, 4 2004 @ 08:08 PM
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Originally posted by curme
I was going to join the Marines, but my ASVAB was to high.

Really? When I went in, the Corps had the highest ASVAB requirement. That statement alone tells me you may not have done as well as you think.



posted on Sep, 4 2004 @ 08:11 PM
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Curme is known far and wide for his sarcastic wit. What I think he fails to understand is that on those occasions when he might want to be taken seriously, most are likely to dismiss his contributions as something other than serious.



posted on Sep, 4 2004 @ 08:12 PM
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I was attached to the 31st MEU for the first US military trip back to the PI in 1994. Good times. Liberty in Manila and Cebu, training on Panay, and get this: on 50th anniversary of Battle of Leyte Gulf I got to participate in the re-enactment of the Battle of Leyte Gulf by getting into old school landing craft and landing on the beach in WW2 soldier uniforms, steel pots and M1s and taking it back from 'Japanese' soldiers. Then a Hollywood actor impersonating MacArthur landed and gave a 'I have returned' speech in front of PI President and (I think) US SecDef.



posted on Sep, 4 2004 @ 08:23 PM
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Originally posted by sweatmonicaIdo
Thanks. I wanted to be part of the Army, but now I want to be a Marine. I had a life-changing experience, and it was probably the best thing that a person could've ever done for me.


No problem. If you don't mind, spill the beans....if this is to public send U2U.



posted on Sep, 4 2004 @ 08:38 PM
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Originally posted by taibunsuu
I got to participate in the re-enactment of the Battle of Leyte Gulf by getting into old school landing craft and landing on the beach in WW2 soldier uniforms, steel pots and M1s and taking it back from 'Japanese' soldiers.


That must have been a wonderful experience. The one thing that always makes me feel so good is how easy it is to relate to Marines of all eras. The Corps' adherence to tradition and its reluctance to make changes for change's sake make the experience similar for all Marines. Having the opportunity to put on the gear and uniforms of the WWII Marines and make a landing must have been priceless.

During my training days we had to practice climbing and descending on cargo nets, one heck of an experience that only increased my respect for the Marines who had to do that down the side of a ship into a heaving landing craft. We also had to practice exiting a landing craft in such a way as to avoid losing a leg to the surfs movement of the craft.

Of course, the helicopter changed all of that and I was a member of the massive amphibious landing on the Bantangan Peninsula in Vietnam. We were helilifted inland by CH-46s. That's a heck of a lot better than going ashore by Higgins boat.

While I was with W/1/13 we were helilifted to positions that would have been otherwise inaccessible by a 4.2" mortar battery and in positions that were a heck of lot hotter, too. I'll never forget those choppers squatting on the side of a hill with the front up to make the off-load level and taking off as soon as the last Marine's foot left the ramp, lifting the tail of the chopper to get more thrust and getting the heck out of the area.

When they'd come to get us, they'd put that chopper down long enough for us to load our gear and as soon as the last Marine cleared the ramp the pilots would lift the tail and take off, throwing the whole gun crew toward the front of the craft into a heap. I'll always marvel at those Marine chopper pilots--100% business.


[edit on 04/9/4 by GradyPhilpott]



posted on Sep, 4 2004 @ 08:50 PM
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I actually just started college for the first time.

Early in January, I wanted to be an Army officer because I thoguht the Army was so cool with Force XXI and all the high-tech equipment and weaponry.

But here was the life-changing experience: Army Reverand Michael Yee and Abu Ghraib.

When I first saw that, I noticed something. They're both fully Army-related. The Marines weren't making any commotion. That told me a lot about the Army. They have problems. Lots of problems. Then there were the recruiting post. It was right next to the Marine Corps recruiting post. The Marines were working hard at their posts, every single day. But the Army post was always deserted. Always.

Then I was approached by Staff Sergeant Trent and later, Staff Sergeant Machado. They asked me why I wanted to go to the Army, and I told them so. But what they told me, the Marines could give me more than the Army could. The Marines wouldn't give me friends, they'd give me a family, people who genuinely cared for you and it wasn't a just professional relationship. They also told me being a Marine would give me fulfillment. Nothing would be better than to do the things that Marines do, and it for the "right" causes, and with nobility, courage, and respect.

And as a plus, the Marines were first in battle. Which guarantees I'll see action in any combat!

Finally, the Marines actually had the nerve to call me up and try to recruit me. The Army and the Navy pretended like I hadn't even asked for more information. It was as if they were saying, "If you want to join, fine, we don't care either way." But the Marine Corps, they wanted me to join them. That makes someone feel pretty damn good! After a life in which where I always took a backseat, finally someone wanted me to be part of something great.

The last thing I noticed was their advertisement. The U.S. Army spends truckloads on advertising. They have literally flooded television with so many different commercials. They have also gone from "Be All That You Can Be" to "Army of One" in a span of about 10 years. The Marine Corps started with "The Few. The Proud. The Marines." And they have never changed. And they reuse the same commercials, or they don't advertise at all. The U.S. Army freely distributes the multiplayer game America's Army. They have their own NASCAR team. The Marines need none of that. That tells you everything.

More on the Army. I hear nothing but whining from the Army. They hate the deployment time, they hate the lack of comraderie, they feel like they're in hostile territory, they're treated badly, etc. Why would anyone want to join such a corrupted organization? One that treats people (Iraqi prisoners) like garbage, and even their own soldiers (Army soldiers killed a fellow soldier in Georgia and tried to get away with it). I just cannot find the courage to join such a troubled team (or lack thereof). And the Marines have been getting their asses kicked in Iraq, yet they never complain. They just keep fighting. And Marines don't use politics or ideology to further themselves like the Army does. Nor do they try to paint a rosy picture. The Marines are honest, they tell it like it is.

Last reason: The Marines say they can't get everybody. But that's okay for them. They don't want everybody.


That shows you just how good these guys are. Thanks to Sergeant Trent and Machado, I'm on the right track.



posted on Sep, 4 2004 @ 08:55 PM
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Originally posted by taibunsuu
Politicians will sell troops down river in a heartbeat no matter if they're Repub or Dem. I hope for best in Iraq and protested war before it started. Now that it's going we should make every effort to achieve war aims. Only problem is my faith in capabilities of US troops is about 1000 times stronger than my faith in any politician, repub or dem.


Great post.

Politicians will never go ahead of America's soldiers. As far as I'm concerned, politicians are lesser people than American soldiers, or the American people.



posted on Sep, 4 2004 @ 09:18 PM
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Originally posted by GradyPhilpott

Originally posted by taibunsuu
I got to participate in the re-enactment of the Battle of Leyte Gulf by getting into old school landing craft and landing on the beach in WW2 soldier uniforms, steel pots and M1s and taking it back from 'Japanese' soldiers.


That must have been a wonderful experience. The one thing that always makes me feel so good is how easy it is to relate to Marines of all eras. The Corps' adherence to tradition and its reluctance to make changes for change's sake make the experience similar for all Marines. Having the opportunity to put on the gear and uniforms of the WWII Marines and make a landing must have been priceless.

During my training days we had to practice climbing and descending on cargo nets, one heck of an experience that only increased my respect for the Marines who had to do that down the side of a ship into a heaving landing craft. We also had to practice exiting a landing craft in such a way as to avoid losing a leg to the surfs movement of the craft.

Of course, the helicopter changed all of that and I was a member of the massive amphibious landing on the Bantangan Peninsula in Vietnam. We were helilifted inland by CH-46s. That's a heck of a lot better than going ashore by Higgins boat.

While I was with W/1/13 we were helilifted to positions that would have been otherwise inaccessible by a 4.2" mortar battery and in positions that were a heck of lot hotter, too. I'll never forget those choppers squatting on the side of a hill with the front up to make the off-load level and taking off as soon as the last Marine's foot left the ramp, lifting the tail of the chopper to get more thrust and getting the heck out of the area.

When they'd come to get us, they'd put that chopper down long enough for us to load our gear and as soon as the last Marine cleared the ramp the pilots would lift the tail and take off, throwing the whole gun crew toward the front of the craft into a heap. I'll always marvel at those Marine chopper pilots--100% business.


[edit on 04/9/4 by GradyPhilpott]


Well we didn't actually have WW2-era Marine uniforms, it was just WW2-era GI Issue steel pots and khakis. I actually think the Army made the Leyte landing, I'm not sure. All the old # came from the PI military including the landing craft and the landing craft pilot. We had to descend cargo nets to get into the landing craft and fortunately it was pretty calm water. I was actually the only one not in the old uniforms because I was a last-minute addition to document the event for the Marine Corps. So it was 50 Marines with M1s looking like WW2 soldiers and me in cammies with a Nikon F1. We orbited off the beach while some Warbird-type fighters did a dogfight and Japanese soldiers 'abused' PI civilians. Then we all got on line and headed into beach and kept our heads down while big ass firecrackers blew the beach up. Then we landed in about hip deep water and did squad rushes up the beach. I was on left-most side since I was in modern cammies to not ruin effect. It really gave incredible sense of what a WW2-era beach landing was like, except we had the benefit of not taking incoming fire.
We were observed doing this by 250,000 Philippinos. After we did this the MEU did a modern landing with AAAVs and that was a big hit as well. People always like it when they engage tractor drive and pull up onto beach and two dozen Marines pop out of each one firing away in squad rushes. ^^



posted on Sep, 4 2004 @ 09:26 PM
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Originally posted by sweatmonicaIdo
The Marine Corps started with "The Few. The Proud. The Marines." And they have never changed. And they reuse the same commercials, or they don't advertise at all. The U.S. Army freely distributes the multiplayer game America's Army. They have their own NASCAR team. The Marines need none of that. That tells you everything.


I certainly wouldn't argue with anything you've said. I heard pretty much that story before that men made the decision to go with the Corps because of the attitude of their recruiters.

I do want to point out that the Marine Corps does change its commercial appeals from time to time. When I enlisted the slogan was "The Marine Corps builds men, body, mind and spirit. That gave way to "Pride in America, ask a Marine," which became "We don't promise you a rose garden," which was changed to "The Marines are looking for a few good men," which was actually one of the first recruiting slogans used for the Continental Marines. Now, we have The Few, the Proud, the Marines. Things have changed but the message always is the same. The qualities of character imparted by the Marine Corps through its adherence to traditionally high standards.

Also, the Marine Corps races a car in the Busch series and a truck in the truck series.

www.usmc.mil...

www.racingone.com...

[edit on 04/9/4 by GradyPhilpott]



posted on Sep, 4 2004 @ 09:32 PM
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If you guys have any specifics about Marine Recruiting ask me. There's a small command called Marine Corps Recruiting Command it operates out of HQMC and is the post that runs all Marine Recruiting. I worked there in the Public Relations / Press department from 1995 October to 1997 August.

And yes, "The Few, The Proud, The Marines" is a change form the original recruiting slogan. I'm sure a few of you can remember the original. Had something to do with the whole women's lib thing



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