Will you buy this 5000 dollars Hamburger?Very cheap! Could you eat it?On this crisis?

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posted on Nov, 17 2011 @ 02:46 PM
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reply to post by Dr Love
 

Thats not very nice....
heck, I couldn't afford just the tip let alone the burger and the wine.




posted on Nov, 17 2011 @ 02:48 PM
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reply to post by diamondsmith
 


I have been drooling over campers on craigslist for awhile.
I would rather use the $5000.00 toward a nice camper then
to waste it on a burger.



posted on Nov, 17 2011 @ 03:50 PM
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A bottle of Chateau Pétrus 1990 wine alone cost about 5000 dollars, as I just checked on internet. That means the burger is just a trick to sell the wine.



posted on Nov, 17 2011 @ 04:24 PM
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Originally posted by Dr Love
I'd buy it if I could, then leave the waiter no tip.

Peace


Ah, now....Why take it out on the waiter? Most people don't know this, but, waiters/waitresses' tips are taxed based on their sales not on what they actually make. So, $5,000/8%=$400 tip. The IRS will tax the server on $400 @ say 20%= $80 is what it would cost that waiter/waitress to wait on you, out of their litteral pocket!

Please tip your server!



posted on Nov, 17 2011 @ 04:34 PM
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And to think I feel guilty for blowing $12.90 on the pizza I had delivered this evening...



posted on Nov, 17 2011 @ 05:37 PM
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I would enjoy the burger but afterwards I would enjoy even more,
having the most expensive sh*t in history.
Hold the onions, please.

p.s As per recent threads here, I would definitely consider recycling
that poop, and maybe producing another burger from it.



posted on Nov, 17 2011 @ 07:37 PM
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I will buy that hamburger and gladly pay you next Tuesday.



posted on Nov, 17 2011 @ 10:10 PM
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the most expensive burger ive ever seen was one of those resturant challenge burgers, where its like 5lbs of beef for $25, and if you eat it all its free haha



posted on Nov, 17 2011 @ 11:30 PM
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Originally posted by grubblesnert
I will buy that hamburger and gladly pay you next Tuesday.




(Get it - eye pop).



posted on Nov, 17 2011 @ 11:41 PM
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And it still wont tast as good as a regular burger.



posted on Nov, 17 2011 @ 11:42 PM
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what idiots



posted on Nov, 18 2011 @ 01:19 AM
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What the history tell us


Text209-1121 - Genghis Khan (1167-1227), crowned the "emperor of all emperors," and his army of fierce Mongol horsemen, known as the "Golden Horde," conquered two thirds of the then known world. The Mongols were a fast-moving, cavalry-based army that rode small sturdy ponies. They stayed in their saddles for long period of time, sometimes days without ever dismounting. They had little opportunity to stop and build a fire for their meal. The entire village would follow behind the army on great wheeled carts they called "yurts," leading huge herds of sheep, goats, oxen, and horses. As the army needed food that could be carried on their mounts and eaten easily with one hand while they rode, ground meat was the perfect choice. They would use scrapings of lamb or mutton which were formed into flat patties. They softened the meat by placing them under the saddles of their horses while riding into battle. When it was time to eat, the meat would be eaten raw, having been tenderized by the saddle and the back of the horse. 1238 - When Genghis Khan's grandson, Khubilai Khan (1215-1294), invaded Moscow, they naturally brought their unique dietary ground meat with them. The Russians adopted it into their own cuisine with the name "Steak Tartare," (Tartars being their name for the Mongols). Over many years, Russian chefs adapted and developed this dish and refining it with chopped onions and raw eggs.
source(whatscookingamerica.net...



posted on Nov, 18 2011 @ 01:21 AM
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Originally posted by shadowreborn89
what idiots
I don't think so!

Beginning in the fifteenth century, minced beef was a valued delicacy throughout Europe. Hashed beef was made into sausage in several different regions of Europe.

1600s - Ships from the German port of Hamburg, Germany began calling on Russian port. During this period the Russian steak tartare was brought back to Germany and called "tartare steak."source(whatscookingamerica.net...



posted on Nov, 18 2011 @ 01:23 AM
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In the late eighteenth century, the largest ports in Europe were in Germany. Sailors who had visited the ports of Hamburg, Germany and New York, brought this food and term "Hamburg Steak" into popular usage. To attract German sailors, eating stands along the New York city harbor offered "steak cooked in the Hamburg style."

In 1802, the Oxford English Dictionary defined Hamburg steak as salt beef. It had little resemblance to the hamburger we know today. It was a hard slab of salted minced beef, often slightly smoked, mixed with onions and breadcrumbs. The emphasis was more on durability than taste.

Immigrants to the United States from German-speaking countries brought with them some of their favorite foods. One of them was Hamburg Steak. The Germans simply flavored shredded low-grade beef with regional spices, and both cooked and raw it became a standard meal among the poorer classes. In the seaport town of Hamburg, it acquired the name Hamburg steak. Today, this hamburger patty is no longer called Hamburg Steak in Germany but rather "Frikadelle," "Frikandelle" or "Bulette," orginally Italian and French words source(whatscookingamerica.net...



posted on Nov, 22 2011 @ 12:27 AM
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I love meat but I am sorry there is NO hamburger in the world worth $5000 and anyone who is willing to pay that needs to have their hear examined. this is insane



posted on Nov, 22 2011 @ 12:45 AM
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Originally posted by JROCK2527
I love meat but I am sorry there is NO hamburger in the world worth $5000 and anyone who is willing to pay that needs to have their hear examined. this is insane
Yes but there are people who pay for that hamburger,that's the peak!





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