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Bright star next to the moon, something wrong?

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posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 04:36 PM
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I was looking at the moon tonight and noticed a bright star to the bottom right of it. Im in the UK.

I used Google Star maps and discovered according to it that this star was in fact Neptune. I got out my telescope to have a good look at it. I was shocked at how easy it was to track it, many times before I have tried to look at planets in our system but they move so quick that its hard to keep track, but in the case Neptune if thats what it was appeared to be sat there not moving.

That was earlier, 3 hours later I went back outside and noticed that even though the moon was in a different place the planet I had seen before was still just off to the bottom right of the moon.

It was then I got thinking to myself surely shouldnt have this planet moved off by now? Why is it still fixed to the bottom right of the moon?

Maybe this is normal and im making a fool of myself, but i thought it was weird that by now this planet shouldnt be in the exact same place to the moon as it was earlier.
edit on 9-11-2011 by bluloa because: (no reason given)
edit on 9-11-2011 by bluloa because: spelling
edit on 9-11-2011 by bluloa because: corrections




posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 04:38 PM
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reply to post by bluloa
 


i am in the southern US, and while looking for yu55, i noticed that last night as well... i also noticed a massive cloud circle around the moon, almost perfectly encompassing it... very strange sky last night...


+1 more 
posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 04:40 PM
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Jupiter is what is bright near the moon right now.
The moon's orbit and placement each day can't really be compared to Jupiter equally. Jupiter's orbit is very long and will appear to only move slightly each night, the moon will appear in dramatically different places each night.

earthsky.org...
edit on 9-11-2011 by JibbyJedi because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 04:41 PM
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I think Jupiter is supposed park itself next to the Moon right now. I highly doubt Neptune (our official furthermost planet) would be that visible let alone that bright.



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 04:41 PM
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reply to post by bluloa
 


It's Jupiter.

edit on 11/9/11 by AnonymousCitizen because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 04:42 PM
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Originally posted by JibbyJedi
Jupiter is what is bright near the moon right now.
The moon's orbit and placement each day can't really be compared to Jupiter equally. Jupiter's orbit is very long and will appear to only move slightly each night, the moon will appear in dramatically different places each night.




But in this case Jupiter if thats what it is seems to be moving with the moon and staying in the same position, just off to the bottom right of the moon. Its almost as if where the moon goes it goes !

edit on 9-11-2011 by bluloa because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 04:43 PM
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It's just Jupiter (I think)
www.skyandtelescope.com...



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 04:48 PM
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Originally posted by schitzoandro
reply to post by bluloa
 


i also noticed a massive cloud circle around the moon, almost perfectly encompassing it... very strange sky last night...



this is exactly what i saw in the uk tonight... the moon had no clouds around it other than this strange round cloud covering it perfectly.. it looked weird??



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 04:50 PM
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picture from Cartes du Ciel.

You can see the moon, and Jupiter below it...


edit on 9/11/2011 by Hellhound604 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 04:53 PM
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The circle around the moon is actually a layer of very thin ice crystals (aka cloud) It is so thin that you cannot see the cloud, however, the refraction of the light from the moon (reflected sunlight) causes what appears to be a circular "halo" effect. It usually means a change in the weather is coming. Usually just before a cold front.



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 04:53 PM
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Originally posted by Hellhound604
picture from Cartes du Ciel.

You can see the moon, and Jupiter below it...


edit on 9/11/2011 by Hellhound604 because: (no reason given)


Thats it, but what I find strange is that where the moon moves too Jupiter stays with it in the same location. Surely shouldnt Jupiter be in a different position throughout the night ?



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 04:56 PM
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reply to post by bluloa
 


You should download Stellarium so you can understand the Planets orbit. It's a good tool to use when trying to locate certain stars, constellations, or Planets.



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 04:58 PM
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reply to post by schitzoandro
 


The circle around the moon usually means a storm is coming, if you're on the west coast there is a good sized storm coming in this weekend and one that just left that's causing the tornados in the central plains area.
edit on 9-11-2011 by mileslong54 because: (no reason given)


BTW- if you've got a decent new phone, (iphone of droid) download google sky for free and point it at the sky and it will tell you what your looking at as far as celetial objects go.
edit on 9-11-2011 by mileslong54 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 04:59 PM
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reply to post by bluloa
 


This thread again? I posted this same image in response to a similar thread on Oct 13th.



Here is a pic I made using Celestia.



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 04:59 PM
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reply to post by bluloa
 


It does move, just not as fast as you think it should move. Here is what it will look like tomorrow night:



and on Friday night
edit on 9/11/2011 by Hellhound604 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 05:01 PM
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reply to post by AnonymousCitizen
 


I thought that was Venus this time of year. If that's Jupiter than where is Venus. Does it come up later than Jupiter then? That must be the case.
edit on 9-11-2011 by randyvs because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 05:03 PM
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Originally posted by randyvs
reply to post by AnonymousCitizen
 


I thought that was Venus this time of year. If that's Jupiter than where is Venus. Does it come up later than Jupiter then? That must be the case.
edit on 9-11-2011 by randyvs because: (no reason given)


Wednesday, Nov. 9 (from www.skyandtelescope.com...)

In bright twilight just 20 or 30 minutes after sunset, bring binoculars to a location with a clear view practically down to the southwest horizon. There will be Venus, pretty easy to spot. Extending down from Venus in a diagonal line are much fainter Mercury and even-fainter Antares. Good luck!



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 05:05 PM
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Well ive learnt something tonight!

Thanks to everyone for their knowledge, its good to know that ATS isnt all doom porn!



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 05:06 PM
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..been watching Jupiter dance with the moon for the past month or so now; a beautiful sight to behold. Should be fantastic with the full moon tomorrow.



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 05:07 PM
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reply to post by randyvs
 


If you look up at the Sun during high noon Venus will be between the Sun and the horizon on the opposite side of the Sun. Here is a top down view of that.







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