Shock finding: More than 75 percent of all 'honey' sold in grocery stores contains no honey at a

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posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 02:04 PM
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Product Placement


Originally posted by Aim64C
Would everyone please quit being a douche about this?


Originally posted by Majic
The only immutable law of the universe is the Law of Irony.

Just so.




posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 02:07 PM
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reply to post by Aim64C
 



Does it suddenly turn that bottle of honey into a bottle of flavored liquid plastic? No.


Maybe not flavored plastic, but it certainly isn't honey anymore. It is just a sucrose/glucose/fructose blend of sweeteners.

The recent Corn Industry commercials claim corn syrup is identical to sugar and perfectly safe, but they avoid the fact that industries use "high-fructose" corn syrup, and it is not identical to sugar.

We need a truth in labelling. When we distill wine it becomes schnapps or shine, it is different than it was originally. Many things change when heated. I worked in a juice factory, and it is extremely difficult to make Lemonade stay Yellow after it is pasteurized. It is also extremely difficult to maintain the fruity flavors. A single degree one way or another changes the composition of the juice.

So, I say, if it is filtered, pasteurized, and bottled in bulk, then it probably shouldn't be called honey.



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 02:08 PM
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reply to post by Arbitrageur
 


dealing with crystallized honey is easy, just put it in boiling water for awhile to heat it up, or can even put it in the dishwasher with a load (in a zip lock bag of course). just don't put it in the microwave if in a plastic bottle, creates one hell of a mess when the bottle melts.
i did notice before melting the bottle that using the microwave only de-crystalized it for a few days. an interesting thing just like food heated in a microwave seems to cool rather quickly so does honey.



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 02:10 PM
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this thread makes Winnie the Pooh sad




posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 02:18 PM
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To get real honey, you'll have to search for:

unfiltered, unheated, unpasteurized raw honey

Even still, to avoid heating it directly, those who bottle this honey will let it sit in the heat outside to that it's viscous enough to flow. But, of course the honey was already sitting outside in the heat of a honeycomb, so, fine.

Either way, honey is acidifies the blood and is only going to lead to disease if consumed in large quantities. It's better than sugar, at least, though, since it has a lower glycemic load.



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 02:20 PM
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reply to post by daynight42
 


I eat my oatmeal, which is highly acidic, with raw honey every morning.

It's highly nutritious, and isn't going to lead to squat, except more good years on my time slate.

The veggies in my afternoon meal provide all the alkalinity my body needs.




posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 02:40 PM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 



Maybe not flavored plastic, but it certainly isn't honey anymore. It is just a sucrose/glucose/fructose blend of sweeteners.


I suppose you have some... logical... reason for claiming this?

Does the filtering remove the antioxidant content? No.

Does the filtering remove enzymes? No.

Does the pasteurization remove enzymes? It is believed to disrupt a few - but certainly not all.


The recent Corn Industry commercials claim corn syrup is identical to sugar and perfectly safe, but they avoid the fact that industries use "high-fructose" corn syrup, and it is not identical to sugar.


This is a technicality.

Your body, however, processes it in a practically identical manner.


We need a truth in labelling. When we distill wine it becomes schnapps or shine, it is different than it was originally. Many things change when heated. I worked in a juice factory, and it is extremely difficult to make Lemonade stay Yellow after it is pasteurized. It is also extremely difficult to maintain the fruity flavors. A single degree one way or another changes the composition of the juice.


And to be called Champagne, it has to be made in Champagne; Scotch isn't Scotch unless it comes from Scotland.

Nomenclature is a fickle thing.

Pasteurization, however, does not change what something is. You will have some compounds that are sensitive to temperature - but most are quite robust. There is also the fact that many of the things pasteurization kills are done for the sake of preventing those compounds/enzymes/life-forms from breaking down the food and changing it while it's on the shelf.

If the honey crystallizes by time you get around to using it - you have to heat it up, anyway.


So, I say, if it is filtered, pasteurized, and bottled in bulk, then it probably shouldn't be called honey.


So, what should I call my milk? I get "whole" milk - but that's been pasteurized and had the cream skimmed off. It's not what comes right out of the udder.

You'll have to call it something different from the 2% Milk and the Skim milk - as well as Half&Half (all of which will need new names, as they can't be called milk).



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 02:45 PM
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reply to post by Aim64C
 


Well, I suppose you're right. We already have "Pasteurized Milk" and "Raw Milk," and the Honey already designates "Raw-Unfiltered" or "Pasteurized." I guess it is more of a buyer-beware situation. Many people probably don't realize there is a difference.

And, for some things I'm not against pasteurization. But for something that already has natural properties that do the same thing, I think it is a shame to ruin it.

I also am not a fan of irradiating beef. I can't believe it was approved by the FDA and USDA.

So, it is still "Honey," but why on Earth would anybody buy it after it has been ruined and costs 5x what sugar costs? Might as well just buy the cheap sugar if you aren't going to get the full benefits of the honey.



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 02:54 PM
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To many people believe everything they read, first off pollen is filtered off the raw product because most people like their honey clear and not dark, it is pure honey people, they also filter off the pollen because it is sold separately for many other uses. If my pure honey had pollen in it I would not eat it has an unusual taste, grew up across the street from the bee farmer and had fresh honey daily filtered and unfiltered but still pure and the filtered ones had a much better taste. A few quick searches and you can learn the facts and not a blogs hype.

www.honey.com... this is just one of hundreds of sites you will find this one has a pdf as well that brakes down the chemistry of honey.

the other reason they as in the government do not want keepers to remove the pollen is it makes much harder to trace back to the source.



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 02:55 PM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 


My dad is a beekeeper. I get honey from him as much as possible. Great stuff. There's also a place that sells honey from the locals around here. Good stuff.



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 03:06 PM
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I know a local guy that puts his honey on the front porch of an old abandoned place, with a sign that says "Leave the Money, Take The Honey"

It's some great stuff.

I don't doubt this story is real because there was a bit of a uproar over honey coming from China last year - it was something about how it was being shipped all weird, like, it would go into Australia and then shipped to the US like it was from AU but it was really from China. I know those 2 countries were involved but I think there were others.



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 03:58 PM
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reply to post by Klassified
 


Thanks for posting up the list I just threw out the Sue bee honey we had and my roommates girlfriend is going to pick up the real stuff later. I've started sharing the info with my neighbors and so far it's ruined peoples day.



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 03:59 PM
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reply to post by Klassified
 


Double post.
edit on 9-11-2011 by Silverado292 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 04:06 PM
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I cant decide whats more surprising, the fact that its not really honey or what they are trying to charge for it. seriously, have you priced "honey" these days? locally its going for about $1 an ounce...only to find out its not even honey. makes the price of gas seem cheap by comparison. is there anything they wont scam us over?



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 06:19 PM
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reply to post by Skewed
 


Stores like Safeway and Kroger do have their own store brands, as do most supermarket chains. Granted, their "brand" is for marketing only and usually a third party distributor or vendor is who actually makes the product.



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 06:29 PM
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I absolutely love stories like this.


According to FSN, much of this imposter honey is more likely being secretly imported from China, and may even be contaminated with antibiotic drugs and other foreign materials.
Learn more: www.naturalnews.com/034102_honey_consumer_alert.html#ixzz1dG1VEyl4

more likely being secretly,,,,,,,,,,,,may even be contaminated????????????????????


Did they not test the product or what?

They could have answered all of the questions but did not. I wonder why

(I do realize it was a pollen test, but they have the samples already, they could have done a complete test, it is a univerity afterall.

Oh well, this will not be popular, most content that makes sense on ATS is ignored from the fear mongerers. This article is definitely from a questionable source.



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 06:31 PM
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the nerve!

and they even have the audacity to label them as clover, mixed, etc.

what a sham




posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 06:33 PM
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I thought this was common knowledge? This is why I buy honey locally and straight from the beekeepers.



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 06:33 PM
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en.wikipedia.org...

Andrew Schneider is an American screenwriter and television producer, whose credits include writing for The Sopranos, Northern Exposure, and Alien Nation. He frequently co-writes episodes with his wife, Diane Frolov. In 1992 Schneider won the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series for his work on the Northern Exposure episode "Seoul Mates". The award was shared with Frolov as they co-wrote the episode.[1] Schneider was nominated for a Writers Guild of America Award for best dramatic series at the February 2008 ceremony for his work on the sixth season of The Sopranos.[2][3][4]

www.foodsafetynews.com/2011/11/top-pollen-detective-finds-hone y-a-sticky-business/

Well, he was nominated for a Writers Guild of America Award for best dramatic series at the February 2008 ceremony for his work on the sixth season of The Sopranos.


We should believe his articles,,,,,,,without question
edit on 9-11-2011 by liejunkie01 because: en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 06:36 PM
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This reminds me of a time i had some freinds round, and i walk upto an apple tree in my yard and pick off an apple and start munching on it.

My freinds kid looks up with the strangest look on his face, so assuming he too would like one, i offer him an apple from the tree which he accepts before looking at his dad for confirmation its okay.

As he took a bite i asked, whats with the confused look on your face, where do you think apples come from, he calmly replys with a mouth full of fresh apple, "the store"....

His father then explains how the apples get to the store from regular trees, how he got the age of 7 without working that out for himself i do not know, but its hardly a shineing moment for the youth of today.

People/kids are caring less and less what food is or where it comes from, it seems to not only matter less to them but seems stupid to find out and a waste of time.

The bleak sci fi future of flavored pastes in tubes made from whatevertheheck, is actually closer than you think - and no one seems to care
edit on 9-11-2011 by Biigs because: (no reason given)





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