Help ATS with a contribution via PayPal:
learn more

Shock finding: More than 75 percent of all 'honey' sold in grocery stores contains no honey at a

page: 2
29
<< 1    3  4  5 >>

log in

join

posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 12:28 PM
link   

Originally posted by brokedown
The Amish around me buy their honey in 55 gallon drums from Argentina , then repackage it into bottles with there own label.

This is not illegal, but when one buys Amish, at least I am under the implied impression that it is from their own community’s production. This is not always the case. In their defense they never said that they produced the honey.
edit on 9-11-2011 by brokedown because: spelling correction


That is hilarious, I never imagined the Amish hustlin like that.




posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 12:28 PM
link   

Shock Finding: 90% of food in grocery stores isn't real food at all!



Seriously folks! Why does this suprise anyone? Mother Nature has provided us with all of the food we need, with all of the nutrients we need. What do we do? We take it, bastardize it to no end with chemicals, over-process the nutrients right out of it, package it, ship it, buy it, eat it and then get countless diseases. And THEN... most are stupid enough to sit around and wonder why there is an obesity epidmic, or a diabetes epidemic, or a heart disease epidemic, or a cancer epidemic.

And what amazes me further is that people actually trust the government and the corporations after they have been lied to thousands of times - and those same politicians and corporations have been caught doing it repeatedly. Yet the sheeple continue to trust.

On a lighter note - this is advanced social darwinism. People too stupid to figure it out get to die young and pro-create less. There is hope that perhaps someday we will cull the herd of these moronic mouth-breathers.



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 12:31 PM
link   
Meanwhile in Europe, we are having the exact opposite problem


Under new regulations, jars of honey will have to be marked ‘contains pollen’ – a move experts have branded ludicrous, and say could put some British beekeepers out of business. Read more: www.dailymail.co.uk...



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 12:32 PM
link   
What about Agave? I use that instead of sugar in my coffee, I haven't seen any negative information about that stuff yet. It's a good alternative to honey and processed sweeteners.


Agave does not contain starch. Agave is made from the root of the plant, sometimes referred to as the bulbpina or the “pina”. The agave process is nothing like the process used to derive High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) from corn starch as agave nectar is derived from the fructans of the agave plant.
There are two processes utilized, one is simply heating the nectar to break the fructans down into sugars (fructose and glucose) and the other is to introduce organic certified enzymes to break the fructans down into sugars (fructose and glucose). We prefer the organic enzymes process due to the fact that it eliminates the need to heat the nectar and permits us to retain a “raw” status. Xagave is a USDA certified organic product and is certified to contain no genetically modified organisms (GMOs).



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 12:32 PM
link   
In a farming area its possible to look for alternatives. But what about the working poor and the cities.

I have a feeling that co-ops need to be formed everywhere with real food, as much local as possible and yet its not all local.

For example, we do butter here, but olive oil and coconut oil? I won't give those up either.

We need to do fair trade and co-ops.



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 12:35 PM
link   
Ultra filtered may not mean it doesn't come from bees, but it does mean that the beneficial components of honey are likely filtered out. Raw honey (which doesn't preclude it from being filtered through cheesecloth or something) is the best and the best for you.
With the ultrafiltered stuff, you may as well be buying sugar water.

It may take some looking, but local beekeepers are often not more expensive than the storebought stuff either. They usually have more honey than they know what to do with. Local honey is great for allergies.
I know they have fresh honey sources in the New Orleans metro. Can't speak for other urban/suburban areas.

In truth, anyone can keep bees on the cheap with a modest amount of equipment. Just need a couple of boxes. A smoker to keep them calm is the most important thing. You can homemake a helmet and wear thick gloves and long sleeves
edit on 9-11-2011 by radosta because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 12:36 PM
link   

Originally posted by davespanners
Meanwhile in Europe, we are having the exact opposite problem


Under new regulations, jars of honey will have to be marked ‘contains pollen’ – a move experts have branded ludicrous, and say could put some British beekeepers out of business. Read more: www.dailymail.co.uk...






Honey so processed it can no longer be called honey, mass mysterious bee die offs, counterfeit honey, Amish selling honey from Argentina, and absurd honey regulations of real honey in Europe.... Who knew the honey industry was so.... #$%&?



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 12:38 PM
link   
Then what it is..
if not honey ?



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 12:46 PM
link   
reply to post by Klassified
 


Wow this is some sad news thanks for posting it up. It looks like I'll be going back to the Russian market down the road they have raw honey with some of the cone in it.



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 12:47 PM
link   

Originally posted by Vandalour
Then what it is..
if not honey ?


The OP's article is talking about honey that has been filtered and processed so much, that it is to far from raw honey for the FDA to allow it to be called honey.

And also, it seems much of the "honey" in the US ordinates from china, where they add ingredients to cut costs:

"Chinese honey brokers have been known to create counterfeit product made of "a mix of sugar water, malt sweeteners, corn or rice syrup, jaggery [a type of unrefined sugar], barley malt sweetener or other additives with a bit of actual honey." A label is slapped on the container and the adulterated honey is shipped through another country -- for the most part, India -- before finally making its way to the US."

www.grist.org...



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 12:47 PM
link   

Originally posted by Vandalour
Then what it is..
if not honey ?
It's filtered honey, apparently.

Filtering it gives it a longer shelf life without crystallizing, among other things. Have you ever opened an old jar of honey that was crystallized?

I have and just heated it up by sticking the glass jar in a pot of warm water on the stove, to get rid of the crystals. But if it's filtered well enough, the crystals take longer to form.

I must admit, I don't use all my honey immediately after purchase so it can sit for a while before use, and not having to heat it to decrystallize it is kind of nice.
edit on 9-11-2011 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 12:50 PM
link   

Originally posted by navy_vet_stg3
reply to post by unityemissions
 

Raw and unfiltered. I like the little chunks.




Me too.

It's the same way I like my kefir.



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 01:10 PM
link   
reply to post by JibbyJedi
 
I haven't heard of any problems with agave nectar, but I also don't have problems with (raw) honey or (turbinado) sugar - just get raw or unrefined versions of pretty much whatever you eat.

Refining processes, when taken too far, seem to be the biggest problems generally...making the food effectively worthless, stripping out all health benefits or nutrients - whatever. White sugar, white/refined flour, white rice, ultrafiltered honey...sure, it's all tasty, but when it makes us fat, allergied, and unhealthy in various other ways...why bother?



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 01:28 PM
link   

Originally posted by Praetorius
reply to post by JibbyJedi
 
I haven't heard of any problems with agave nectar, but I also don't have problems with (raw) honey or (turbinado) sugar - just get raw or unrefined versions of pretty much whatever you eat.

Refining processes, when taken too far, seem to be the biggest problems generally...making the food effectively worthless, stripping out all health benefits or nutrients - whatever. White sugar, white/refined flour, white rice, ultrafiltered honey...sure, it's all tasty, but when it makes us fat, allergied, and unhealthy in various other ways...why bother?

I bring to your attention that the Northen Hemisphere is experancing a major dissaperance of Bees and at presant Australian suppliers of bees are flat out trying to keep you supplied for propergation purposes and that further you may be supprised to learn that this phonomina appears within Nostradarmus Propherses and has a further causal link to Magnetic decline, new thread soon to outline this , note do your own spell check



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 01:37 PM
link   
reply to post by alfa1
 

Thanks for the link Alfa. And thanks for the addition to the thread.



Here is a list of the honey tested by Food Safety News that showed no traces of pollen.



• American Choice Clover Honey
• Archer Farms Orange Blossom Honey
• Archer Farms Organic Classic Honey
• Busy Bee Organic Honey
•Busy Bee, Pure Clover Honey
•CVS Honey
• Fred Meyer Clover Honey
• Full Circle Pure Honey
•Giant Eagle Clover Honey
•GE Clover Honey
•Great Value, Clover Honey
•Haggen Honey, Natural & Pure
• HT Traders Tupelo Honey
•Kroger Pure Clover Honey
• Market Pantry Pure Honey
• Mel-o 100 % Pure Honey
•Natural Sue Bee Clover Honey
•Naturally Preferred Fireweed Honey
•Rite Aid Honey
• Safeway Clover Honey
• Silver Bow Pure Honey
• Stop and Shop Clove Honey
• Sue Bee Clover Honey
• Thrifty Bee Honey
• Valutime Honey
•Walgreen MEL-O honey
•Western Family Clover Honey
•Wegman Clover Honey
•Winnie the Pooh, Pure Clover


Test show most store honey isn't honey...



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 01:40 PM
link   
You know what goes good with honey? Chicken nuggets
they are a fake too right? Mmm


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 01:44 PM
link   
reply to post by Klassified
 


I believe it. When I was younger we had our own bee hives and harvested the honey. I used to chew on the honeycomb, so delicious!

When I had my first store bought honey my mouth was very confused as it did not recognize the strange and rather chemical flavor on my tongue.

I LOVE honey, but only buy it organic and try to get it from local farmers because there is absolutely no comparison.



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 01:47 PM
link   
reply to post by Klassified
 


I've suspected this for years! Plus, honey in stores is often pasteurized and/or diluted, and it provides no real health benefits.

Local Honey is extremely easy to find. I have 2 folks in my office that sell their own honey. Honey is sold in roadside stands, and even in a couple of convenience stores down here.

Local Honey has the benefit of helping your body adapt to the natural pollen in your area and avoid allergies. It also has the natural ability to resist mold and bacteria, so it will stay good virtually forever.

Never buy honey from a big box or chain store. Buy it locally or don't buy it at all.



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 01:59 PM
link   
How Sweet It Is


Originally posted by davespanners
Meanwhile in Europe, we are having the exact opposite problem

The only immutable law of the universe is the Law of Irony.

Coming soon to store-brand honey jars near you...

"Pollen-free for your protection."

Marketing makes everything better.



posted on Nov, 9 2011 @ 02:00 PM
link   
So... if we heat honey... and filter out the pollen.... it's no longer honey.

Makes... about as much sense as every other alarmist thread out there.

Now, what would be more appropriate (and useful) is a study that aims to determine just how much of the major brands of honey are not watered down, cut with corn syrup, or something else along those lines. This study borderlines on slander (though they use the FDA's regulations... which, honestly, whoever made the call that "honey filtered to contain no pollen is not honey" needs to be publicly executed and have their blood line purged from the gene pool).

This study is pretty much useless: "You mean to tell me that the ultra-clear stuff on the shelf at Wal-Mart has been filtered!? No WAY!"

Even more ridiculous is the "naturist" response from these forums.

Is filtered honey going to differ from unfiltered? Yes. Is the pasteurization also going to change things? Yes.

Does it suddenly turn that bottle of honey into a bottle of flavored liquid plastic? No.

Would everyone please quit being a douche about this?





new topics

top topics



 
29
<< 1    3  4  5 >>

log in

join