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SCI/TECH: Vehicle Assembly Building and Frances

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posted on Sep, 2 2004 @ 10:38 PM
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Hurricane Frances on September 1, from the International Space Station.


I think it makes a lot of sense why they built it in Florida, If a rocket goes crazy and they have to blow it up, then it's not a very big deal, because its over water and not houses. with water on 3 sides of it, it makes it a good place to put it.

[edit on 2-9-2004 by Murcielago]




posted on Sep, 3 2004 @ 03:41 AM
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Also it was built in Florida as it is the most southerly state hence closer to the equator which makes it easier to reach orbit



posted on Sep, 3 2004 @ 04:15 AM
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I don't understand why they don't have any underground places to store the most valuable equipment.
It's not like the area where they wanted to build the hangar is tornado- and hurricane-free.


kix

posted on Sep, 3 2004 @ 08:21 AM
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Its on Florida because the closer to the equator the more angular momentum a rocket has (thast why the arianne rockets from GESA are launched from south america.

I hope Frances does not damage the already crippled NASA space Program (note ..I said NASA not the US space program). But if the Kennedy Space Center is destroyed I think something good will come out of it, because disasters teaches us lessons and brings the best of us (sadly most of the time we enjoy a "good" life and we dont plan or be grateful for it).

My prayers on all those who will be in its path.



posted on Sep, 3 2004 @ 08:36 AM
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Originally posted by EmbryonicEssence
Thats very true Valhall. But, why not build it right the first time?


Materials technology, building codes and our level of intelligence about hurricanes all were much different 30 years ago. The building is actually 42 years old (parts of it atleast -- it took four years to build).



posted on Sep, 3 2004 @ 08:39 AM
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Originally posted by Jakko
I don't understand why they don't have any underground places to store the most valuable equipment.
It's not like the area where they wanted to build the hangar is tornado- and hurricane-free.


There's no way to build a suitable underground shelter like what's needed in that part of Florida. The whole KSC complex is surrounded by and build on marsh land.

There are other things at risk here as well. KSC is a national protected area for migratory birds. Let's also not forget about the public part of KSC, the historical launch pads and rockets on display for tourists. Those will all be destroyed most likely.



posted on Sep, 3 2004 @ 11:17 AM
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Titian
There are other things at risk here as well. KSC is a national protected area for migratory birds. Let's also not forget about the public part of KSC, the historical launch pads and rockets on display for tourists. Those will all be destroyed most likely.


No, all the lauch pads and facilities can with stand catefory 5, only the shuttle building and a coupe other small building can withstand a category 3 or less.



posted on Sep, 3 2004 @ 12:20 PM
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I think if NASA was really worried about serious damage from Frances, they would be doing more about it....
....like dropping disiccant on her.... dynomat.com...



posted on Sep, 3 2004 @ 03:32 PM
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if you want a barn built right, you have the amish build it...
they still have barns standing from 1800... probably only cost em $300 bucks or so...eh?

on a serious note... why didn't they just build it in south texas... less marsh, more solid ground and much less hurricanes... also just as near to the equator... might have been a florida senators pet project to convince them to build a million ton launch pad in the middle of a swamp in hurricane central.

my thoughts go out to anyone who stays for this big one...



posted on Sep, 6 2004 @ 06:13 PM
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www.cnn.com
CNN) -- NASA managers worried Monday about the prospect of Hurricane Ivan after Hurricane Frances ripped about 1,000 4-by-10-foot aluminum panels off one side of its massive Vehicle Assembly Building, Kennedy Space Center director Jim Kennedy said.

Kennedy said center staff will concentrate on protecting the 40-story, 560-foot building from further damage.

"I don't see how we could do too much to repair those openings in a few days' time," he said.

Kennedy said the checkerboard-patterned damage was the worst storm damage in the center's history -- like 40,000 square feet of new windows opened from the 100-foot level to the 350-foot level.

www.cnn.com...


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


I was hoping this wouldn't happen, but with a storm that size it sure isn't a big surprise. Sure hope Ivan leaves Florida alone.

[edit on 9-6-2004 by Valhall]



posted on Sep, 6 2004 @ 06:59 PM
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When I first saw this on the main page, I thought it said, "France tears panels from NASA shuttle hangar." I was thinking, "What are those cheese monkeys up to now?"



posted on Sep, 6 2004 @ 10:21 PM
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Originally posted by LazarusTheLong
on a serious note... why didn't they just build it in south texas... less marsh, more solid ground and much less hurricanes... also just as near to the equator... might have been a florida senators pet project to convince them to build a million ton launch pad in the middle of a swamp in hurricane central.


Do you think Texas doesn't have hurricanes and Tornados too? I can assure you it is quite the opposite.



posted on Sep, 7 2004 @ 12:16 AM
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Originally posted by shbaz
Do you think Texas doesn't have hurricanes and Tornados too? I can assure you it is quite the opposite.


The Hurricane that Changed America



posted on Sep, 7 2004 @ 08:13 AM
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A Mercury-Redstone rocket that once stood upright at the credentialing center at the Kennedy Space Center (news - web sites) in Titusville, Fla. lies on the grass after being blown down by Hurricane Frances Saturday, Sept. 5, 2004. A rocket similar to this was used to launch Alan Shepard on the first unmanned suborbital mission. (AP Photo/Peter Cosgrove)

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.



posted on Sep, 7 2004 @ 11:56 AM
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Originally posted by Valhall


A Mercury-Redstone rocket that once stood upright at the credentialing center at the Kennedy Space Center (news - web sites) in Titusville, Fla. lies on the grass after being blown down by Hurricane Frances Saturday, Sept. 5, 2004. A rocket similar to this was used to launch Alan Shepard on the first unmanned suborbital mission. (AP Photo/Peter Cosgrove)

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.



Originally posted by titian
There are other things at risk here as well. KSC is a national protected area for migratory birds. Let's also not forget about the public part of KSC, the historical launch pads and rockets on display for tourists. Those will all be destroyed most likely.


Exactly what I was afraid of. I loved that place as a kid. Mom and dad met at the cape, grandfather was electrical engineer on 39A. The loss of historical aspects is just as bad as loss of current operational aspects -- but I've read so far that NASA was pretty lucky.



posted on Sep, 7 2004 @ 12:51 PM
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Originally posted by GradyPhilpott

Originally posted by shbaz
Do you think Texas doesn't have hurricanes and Tornados too? I can assure you it is quite the opposite.


The Hurricane that Changed America




I watched the history report on this. It was on about a month or two ago.
It was very good. It just shows how we are nothing, and know nothing in the world of chaos.



posted on Sep, 7 2004 @ 03:57 PM
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Originally posted by orionthehunter
I remember hearing about the danger to this building or buildings during another major hurricane that fortunately missed. I was wondering if there was a way to beef up the building structure or a way to more quickly relocate shuttles. I guess no one thought about relocating shuttles during late August through mid Sept even though Sept is peak hurricane season. I can imagine lots of critism if anything happens.

I also remember seeing a tornado funnel form in the distance while on a tour bus at Cape Kennedy. It's a bit disturbing to see a tornado form and you are stuck on a tour bus getting a tour while a tornado is swooping down from the sky a little distance away. I seemed to be the only one watching the tornado too! Everybody else was looking at the buildings.
Anyone got a graphic showing where Cape Kennedy is and the projected hurricane path? Maybe the eye and most destructive winds will miss again. Thirty years of misses makes NASA complacent I guess. I hope the buildings and shuttles don't get damaged too much.

Added later: I missed the previous post. Sounds like great news. I'm glad to hear that NASA and the US space program will get lucky again. Too bad they aren't lucky all the time.

[edit on 2-9-2004 by orionthehunter]


Just out of curiosity, when was that!? Because I remember the same thing happening to me.



posted on Sep, 7 2004 @ 03:58 PM
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Originally posted by Valhall




A Mercury-Redstone rocket that once stood upright at the credentialing center at the Kennedy Space Center (news - web sites) in Titusville, Fla. lies on the grass after being blown down by Hurricane Frances Saturday, Sept. 5, 2004. A rocket similar to this was used to launch Alan Shepard on the first unmanned suborbital mission. (AP Photo/Peter Cosgrove)

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


Oh man, I remember seeing that, that's messed up.



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