Ancient Cave in the Moravian Karst Still Stumps Archaeologists: (ever heard of this place?)

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posted on Nov, 3 2011 @ 10:56 PM
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reply to post by steveknows
 


Very nice indeed.

But, it seems so polished-as well as better crafted-for the things of that time... from what I have seen.

Which, admittedly, is mostly egyptian.




posted on Nov, 4 2011 @ 12:01 AM
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I'd like to see more detailed pictures. That crown looks especially impressive. It looks almost too good to be true...a picture with better resolution would be nice. I mean, that crown looks damn near perfect which makes the cynic in me raise an eyebrow!



posted on Nov, 4 2011 @ 04:43 AM
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Originally posted by anon72
reply to post by steveknows
 


Very nice indeed.

But, it seems so polished-as well as better crafted-for the things of that time... from what I have seen.

Which, admittedly, is mostly egyptian.


Actually Celtic art and crafting is often second to none and it was the Romans and the Greeks who wrote the history for the most part as Celtic tradition was oral so the Romans and Greeks played down the Celts abilities. later on after Christianity took over, Irish monks who were, though Christian, still proudly Celtic who actually wrote down the truth in regards to the Celts. I've got alot of books with alot of pictures of Celtic gold craft and later I'll scan some and post them if it's allowed and you can see just how good they were. Even their techniques for soldering silver and gold can't be replicated today.

They were amazing. They actually developed a device that holds a sword scabbard and the faster they ran with sword and shield the more firmly the scabbard held to their body while Greeks and Romans were trying to hold sword and shield and not trip over their scabbards as they ran.

You're right in regards to how polished these ones are though.
edit on 4-11-2011 by steveknows because: Typo



posted on Nov, 4 2011 @ 07:36 AM
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reply to post by steveknows
 


This response and the others is why I LOVE ATS.

Thank you for your input.

I just got to thinking.... maybe the finders/keepers of the stuff buffed them up so nicely.

I still can't get over the head piece. It is almost like it was something else-had another real function (part of some alien craft remains etc--yep, I said it).

It was utilzed or thought to be used in the manner displayed.

To me anyway.



posted on Nov, 4 2011 @ 10:07 AM
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reply to post by anon72
 


Haha na no aliens in this one. Just very creative people.

Here's some celtic art and gold work.

If you look at the drawings in the pic below you might note the pattern inside the drawings are similar to the patterns on the head band. It's not so much the border you look at as that is often decided depending on the object it's going on but rather the pattern inside. Also note how the heads are represented which is a common theme. The two circles on the ring in the OP photo looks like two heads as often depicted in Celtic art and the celts were one of the earliest people to use displays of bindings on their fingers which we know today as wedding bands.




Below is another scabbard with again the two ring pattern. I really think the pics of the OP's are truly Celtic.




Anyway that's my view and I say they're celtic but I think the pics are staged myself. Gold thousands of years old isn't that clean I don't think.

Here's some more examples of Celtic ability in art and metal working.











edit on 4-11-2011 by steveknows because: Typo



posted on Nov, 4 2011 @ 10:23 AM
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reply to post by steveknows
 


Surely the condition of the gold would be dependent upon the conditions where it was found. It could be a horrible, dark, damp dingy cave but if the actual gold itself was in a 'nice' location within that cave then it could have been in great condition.

And not to forget, the gold working in this particular area was renowned and generally of a higher skill level than that elsewhere (even other Celtic areas).

I would also add that many of the more ancient warrior tribes placed no emphasis on gold or jewelry trinkets, instead favouring things like weapons and horses. Look at the examples throughout history where the 'spoils' where simply ignored, with the victors simply riding on to the next conquest....



posted on Nov, 4 2011 @ 11:51 PM
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reply to post by steveknows
 


Impressive but I don't think what you have shown is on the same level as the things from the cave.

Not the head dress anyway.

That look machined... IMO. Not saying it was.. but just saying it is a heck of a lot better looking/made then other stuff from that period-from what I have been seeing.



posted on Nov, 5 2011 @ 11:47 AM
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reply to post by anon72
 


The head piece certainly does have that look of being machined doesn't it? Amazing.

A much closer picture would be nice.

A truly detail oriented obsessive artisan?



posted on Nov, 5 2011 @ 11:52 AM
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This article was in another thread here. When I read it, something just clicked there. I read something a while back about a tall, auburn-haired priestess found mummified and buried in the Siberian tundra or the Mongolian steppes, I can't recall which now.

I'm of Czech descent, specifically from Moravia. Although I would very much like to go and explore the place myself, it's unlikely that it would be open to the public. Excavation sites never are.



posted on Nov, 5 2011 @ 12:05 PM
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Originally posted by CosmicEgg
This article was in another thread here. When I read it, something just clicked there. I read something a while back about a tall, auburn-haired priestess found mummified and buried in the Siberian tundra or the Mongolian steppes, I can't recall which now.

I'm of Czech descent, specifically from Moravia. Although I would very much like to go and explore the place myself, it's unlikely that it would be open to the public. Excavation sites never are.


Just the entry way can be visited I believe.



posted on Nov, 5 2011 @ 01:25 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


Long trip to look at sand. Maybe next time, eh? lol

But what do you think? The story and the images fit pretty well, no? There's a lot more out there that I've read over the years and other that I know from "other sources" that I wish I could link to you, but it probably wouldn't matter. Doesn't look like anyone cares much anyway.



posted on Nov, 5 2011 @ 01:51 PM
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Originally posted by CosmicEgg
reply to post by Hanslune
 


Long trip to look at sand. Maybe next time, eh? lol

But what do you think? The story and the images fit pretty well, no? There's a lot more out there that I've read over the years and other that I know from "other sources" that I wish I could link to you, but it probably wouldn't matter. Doesn't look like anyone cares much anyway.


I live in England part of the year and rather like that central Europe




Is this what you are referring too? The link was a bit odd having a number of technical mistakes in regards to archaeology and going off the deep end well before the finish



posted on Nov, 6 2011 @ 01:01 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


No, more like this, actually. Siberia and Mongolia are far from Central Europe.



posted on Nov, 6 2011 @ 09:55 PM
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Originally posted by CosmicEgg
reply to post by Hanslune
 


No, more like this, actually. Siberia and Mongolia are far from Central Europe.




Sorry I've lost what you are trying to say; the image I put up was of the disk that some believe are writing - are you making a different point?



posted on Nov, 6 2011 @ 10:05 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


Yes, I saw the link and went to the article but it wasn't what I was talking about. Funny how those are clearly, to me, runes. Much too old for it, obviously, which makes one wonder about our entire dating system and whether we should put as much stock in it as we do.



posted on Nov, 7 2011 @ 01:03 AM
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Originally posted by CosmicEgg
reply to post by Hanslune
 


Yes, I saw the link and went to the article but it wasn't what I was talking about. Funny how those are clearly, to me, runes. Much too old for it, obviously, which makes one wonder about our entire dating system and whether we should put as much stock in it as we do.



The Tartaria tablets were not dated themselves, they couldn't be, the dated what they were associated with. Not clearly to me that they are runes, especially the two with animals. Maybe a proto-script but with only these examples it hard to say, pre-proto-runes perhaps?

The dating systems do well when associated with and calibrated with other methods.



posted on Nov, 7 2011 @ 12:20 PM
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reply to post by CosmicEgg
 


Hey Cosmic. You got my interest.

Put them here or do up a thread on what you got. (PM me and give me a heads up please)

Someone is always interested at ATS (might not like their input but...) .



posted on Nov, 8 2011 @ 03:18 PM
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Back to the original post, and as to the disarticulated skeletons, could they have been victims of the anthropophagi, a cannibal tribe that was described by Herotodus in " Histories", book four.

"The manners of the Androphagi are more savage than those of any other race. They neither observe justice, nor are governed, by any laws. They are nomads, and their dress is Scythian; but the language which theyspeak is peculiar to themselves. Unlike any other nation in these parts, they are cannibals. ”

And also by Pliny the elder,


The Anthropophagi, whom we have previously mentioned as dwelling ten days journey beyond the Borysthenes, according to the account of Isigonus of Nicæa, were in the habit of drinking out of human skulls, and placing the scalps, with the hair attached, upon their breasts, like so many napkins. "

Naturalis Historia Book 7,Chapter2, trans. John Bostock and H. T. Riley, 1855
Pliny places them 10 days journey beyond the Borysthenes, or Dieneppper river in the Ukraine and Beloruss.

I find the fact the the skeletons were disarticulated to be very interesting, it takes a lot of effort to chop up 40 people and that level of violence goes beyond what you see even extremely brutal cultures.
And that level of brutality is usually reserved for mortal enemies.
And I'm not buying a flower dust explosion as the cause of the dismemberment of the bodies.Low energyezplosions just don't work that way.





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