Thylacine. Is cloning a possibility?

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posted on Apr, 8 2003 @ 05:05 PM
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In 1866, a female Tasmanian Tiger fetus was preserved in ethanol (alcohol) rather than the common solution of formalin. More than a century later that method of preservation provided the crucial linchpin in efforts to clone the species back into existence, after the last known Tasmanian Tiger died in Tasmania's Hobart Zoo on September 7, 1936.
In 1999, Professor Mike Archer, Director of the Australian Museum, discovered that the alcohol solution preserved intact DNA in the specimen"s organs, muscle and bone marrow tissue. He immediately began to explore the possibility of cloning the species, starting the long, and ongoing, process of turning what had previously been Jurassic Park-style science fiction into concrete science fact.
'We were told by so many people in the scientific community that it was near to impossible to clone an extinct species," says Professor Archer. 'But now the dream is starting to become a reality. We"re not there yet, but we have achieved a significant breakthrough by confirming the existence of Tasmanian Tiger DNA and sequencing."



So what do you all think? Is this a possibility? Do you think its a good idea? Any opinions welcomed.




posted on Apr, 8 2003 @ 06:10 PM
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what are they going to use as a host cell for the dna? dont they need a genetically similler female egg to make the clone

[Edited on 8-4-2003 by The Blade Runner]



posted on Apr, 8 2003 @ 06:27 PM
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I never thought about that. Possibly a canine species? Coyote? Something like that? I also heard a while ago (maybe a year or two) that scientists are trying to clone Woolly Mammoths.



posted on Apr, 8 2003 @ 09:03 PM
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This is actually quite cool - it may be the first extinct animal we bring back, because of the pups which were stored in alcohol.

I've exchanged a couple emails with Dr. Archer's assistant; they're quite friendly "down under".

An important milestone is that they were able to take DNA from one of the preserved pups and implement PCR (getting the DNA to duplicate). It shows the DNA is likely viable.

Current discussion is to use a Tasmanian Devil as the host mother, as it's the closest living relative to the Thylacine (aka Tasmanian Wolf).

Next big one I'm waiting for: woolly mammoths. Then sabre-tooth tiger. Eventually (but probably not in my lifetime), Jurassic Park.



posted on Apr, 8 2003 @ 09:14 PM
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What about that marcupial creature thats still supposed to be around australia? That maybe a possible host.



posted on Apr, 8 2003 @ 09:19 PM
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That sounds really cool. A Tasmanian Tiger/Devil cross. What a crazy creature that would be.



posted on Apr, 8 2003 @ 09:19 PM
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Care to elaborate, ADVISOR?



posted on Apr, 9 2003 @ 02:19 PM
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Well, using a Tasmanian Devil as the host doesn't create a new critter - all the genetic material still comes from the Thylacine. The host is just an incubator; they'd use something easier like a sheep if they could, but since the T-Devil is more closely related, it's more likely to supply proper nutrients, temperature, etc.

(The T-Devil is probably the marsupial Advisor was referring to.)

Good links are:
T-Tiger (thylacine) : www.amonline.net.au...
T-Devil:
www.dpiwe.tas.gov.au...






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