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S-37 Berkut Question???? What are those white tailcones?

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posted on Aug, 31 2004 @ 01:47 AM
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With all the Russian Aviation experts on ATS I have a question. What is housed in the twin white cones on the back of the plane? ECM, rear facing radar? IR detectors, chutes?????



[edit on 31-8-2004 by FredT]




posted on Aug, 31 2004 @ 05:09 AM
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Originally posted by FredT


With all the Russian Aviation experts on ATS I have a question. What is housed in the twin white cones on the back of the plane? ECM, rear facing radar? IR detectors, chutes?????




I am certainly not Russian and certainly not an Aviation expert, but i think i have an answer to your query.


Those white cones are covers of the brake parachute housing

Here is a cool cutoff section off the SU-47 to help you :





posted on Aug, 31 2004 @ 04:12 PM
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Cool thanks for the reply.....



posted on Sep, 1 2004 @ 04:31 PM
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Ah so that's what it was. I've always though it was a rear facing radar like the one on the Flankers.



posted on Sep, 1 2004 @ 05:41 PM
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Originally posted by Michael784
Ah so that's what it was. I've always though it was a rear facing radar like the one on the Flankers.


Well one of them does say "airborne interception radar"

Its also interesting that they are not the same length?



[edit on 1-9-2004 by FredT]



posted on Sep, 2 2004 @ 03:59 PM
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Indeed. Maybe easier for the parachute to deploy cause it's further out? And wouldn't that unsymmetricalness in the tail cause a problem to fly?



posted on Sep, 2 2004 @ 04:25 PM
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Originally posted by Michael784
unsymmetricalness


You may find it quicker to type 'asymmetry'



posted on Sep, 2 2004 @ 04:27 PM
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I think difference in drag is pretty minimal compared to other disturbances the plane has to fly through



posted on Sep, 2 2004 @ 04:52 PM
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Originally posted by Michael784
And wouldn't that unsymmetricalness in the tail cause a problem to fly?


Oh, I don't know about that





posted on Sep, 2 2004 @ 04:52 PM
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Actually, the way that I read the diagram, the longer one is the drag chute, the other is a radome. They do appear to be asymmetrical, but in an aircraft of that type, I don't think that it would cause any problems.



posted on Sep, 4 2004 @ 08:37 PM
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I like making up words.

That german plane is pretty awkward. Hard to believe that thing can fly.



posted on Sep, 5 2004 @ 05:45 AM
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Originally posted by Aelita
I think difference in drag is pretty minimal compared to other disturbances the plane has to fly through


Is that pic real or fake ??????????



posted on Sep, 5 2004 @ 07:12 AM
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If you mean the Sukhoi pics then yes they are real and the diagram is accurate. If you mean the photo I posted then yes, it too is very real. It is the Blohm und Voss Bv 141 and an aircraft I discovered when it was available as a 1:72 Airfix kit in the '70's. I do know that it flew, but I don't know how well, I believe it was intended as a replacement for the Fw 189.



posted on Sep, 5 2004 @ 08:33 PM
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Pretty cool. What's the name of that plane? Nevermind Scanned a little too quickly.

[edit on 6-9-2004 by Michael784]



posted on Sep, 5 2004 @ 10:37 PM
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Originally posted by Michael784
Pretty cool. What's the name of that plane?

I believe he states the answer already, READ.

Shattered OUT...



posted on Sep, 7 2004 @ 10:51 AM
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Originally posted by Ouizel
Actually, the way that I read the diagram, the longer one is the drag chute, the other is a radome. They do appear to be asymmetrical, but in an aircraft of that type, I don't think that it would cause any problems.



Actually, I would be more worried about the 'asymmetry' of the chute placement after deployment on the runway. If the riser attachment is not centerline, the adverse yaw effect upon drag chute deployment would tend to pull the aircraft to the right, requiring a high degree of correction to the left to maintain runway centerline. I'd be interested to see where the attachment shackle actually is on this aircraft.



posted on Sep, 8 2004 @ 04:17 PM
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Originally posted by Affirmative Reaction

Originally posted by Ouizel
Actually, the way that I read the diagram, the longer one is the drag chute, the other is a radome. They do appear to be asymmetrical, but in an aircraft of that type, I don't think that it would cause any problems.



Actually, I would be more worried about the 'asymmetry' of the chute placement after deployment on the runway. If the riser attachment is not centerline, the adverse yaw effect upon drag chute deployment would tend to pull the aircraft to the right, requiring a high degree of correction to the left to maintain runway centerline. I'd be interested to see where the attachment shackle actually is on this aircraft.

This is an experemental test bed that has proven its worth, if there was a problem with the asymmetry, why would they fly the thing?

Just keep in mind, it flies, it's extremely manueverable.

So it is just normal that the asymmetry does not play a role in its deffects if it has any.

Shattered OUT...



posted on Sep, 12 2004 @ 12:44 AM
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wouldn't a chute in only one of the cones cause it to go out of control since the chute is not centered but its on the right side of the plane? If its going at high speeds and deploys the chute wouldn't the plane go out of control and start to spin a little?



posted on Sep, 12 2004 @ 12:51 AM
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Originally posted by WestPoint23
wouldn't a chute in only one of the cones cause it to go out of control since the chute is not centered but its on the right side of the plane? If its going at high speeds and deploys the chute wouldn't the plane go out of control and start to spin a little?


Thats what I was wondering. All the chutes I have seen from the F-117 to the space shuttle are all on the centerline of the plane. Seems like an unesseary risk IMHO to place the plane in an off axis pull while they are rolling down the runway. Maybe the flight computer uses the rudder to trim it out?



posted on Sep, 14 2004 @ 05:27 AM
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The asymetry must have negligible effect i guess.
Check out the cool menuvers, they'll you why :






















And perfect landing :





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