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Mount Rainier Rumbling?? Let's watch her.....

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posted on Oct, 18 2011 @ 12:27 PM
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Thanks again for the heads up West Coast, I had not heard about this latest little earthquake swarm. I live in Bonney Lake myself and my youngest daughter goes to school in Orting. The Orting school district has fairly regular "lahar drills" where the kids follow the faculty up the surrounding hillsides to get out of the Orting area. I believe they estimate that Orting has around 30 minutes before they are buried by a lahar. She hates the long hike that accompanies the drill, but it is comforting to know that there is a plan. If anyone has ever been to Orting, it has an absolutely breathtaking view of "The Mountain" (as us locals say. On a clear day we are known to remark "The Mountain is out".
). You soon notice though that the surrounding foothills make a literal "funnel" for the lahar to roar through Orting and completely bury it - as it has in the past.

Bonney Lake is roughly 20 miles from Mt Rainier and my house, at 660 feet above sea level, would probably be on a little "island" surrounded by the lahar - but I would most certainly have one of the best seats around for the show! Here's the view from my front porch taken a few years back -



edit on 18-10-2011 by tallcool1 because: spelling and added info




posted on Oct, 18 2011 @ 12:51 PM
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Originally posted by schuyler

My kids live on Lake Tapps, a few miles away. According to the maps, the lava will just surround them before heading for Tacoma along the Puyallup, wiping out the tide flats (some would say that would be a good thing) or North through Auburn, Kent, and Renton until it stops at Lake Washington at the site of the 737 plant, which some would say would be a bad thing.



My dad lives on Lake Tapps too - just a couple of minutes drive from me. If you were on a boat ride on Lake Tapps when Rainier decided to blow, the view from there would be pretty pants-crappingly awesome too. Here's my youngest two daughters' feet on a Lake Tapps boatride with The Mountain in view -




posted on Oct, 18 2011 @ 08:34 PM
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reply to post by tallcool1
 


Amazing pictures! Thank you for sharing. I know they do all sorts of drills there...it is probably one of the few places that realizes the potential!

For those that want a little entertainment and at the same time see a fair depiction of what would happen...watch Dantes peak.



posted on Oct, 18 2011 @ 09:48 PM
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This makes it sound like the earthquake activity is actually the result of large rock falls rather than a real earthquake.

seattletimes.nwsource.com...



posted on Oct, 18 2011 @ 10:33 PM
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reply to post by Avalon42
 


Or perhaps its the other way around,
the quakes are causing the avalanches

edit on 18-10-2011 by crazydaisy because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 18 2011 @ 11:00 PM
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Originally posted by Avalon42
This makes it sound like the earthquake activity is actually the result of large rock falls rather than a real earthquake.

seattletimes.nwsource.com...


I didn't get that from this article. It is from this summer, when they were having several avalanches and has nothing to do with the current quakes.

From the above article:


The events were big enough to register on earthquake sensors, and seismologists at the University of Washington called the park to see what was going on.




Mount Rainier has unleashed massive mudslides, or lahars, in the past. But the current avalanches are tiny by comparison. Nor is there any hint of volcanic activity, which would be required to trigger a lahar from Rainier's south side, Vallance said.

Rangers are advising climbers to avoid the Nisqually Glacier, which is not a common route up the mountain.

It's not clear why the avalanches are so large and frequent this year, Lofgren said. It could be related to heavy snowfall, followed by warmer weather — or something else altogether.

"This is just what happens on mountains," he said.




Again....this was from June. I have seen these on the seismographs before...they have a unique signature that is quite different from a moderate sized quake. Interesting to see. I am curious about the comment that they could be caused by something else altogether....perhaps the temp of the cone rising????



posted on Oct, 25 2011 @ 05:50 AM
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Still grumbling away:
Magnitude 1.9 - duration magnitude (Md)
Time Tuesday, October 25, 2011 at 3:26:21 AM (PDT)
Tuesday, October 25, 2011 at 10:26:21 (UTC)
Distance from Ashford, WA - 24 km (15 miles) ENE (57 degrees)
Carbonado, WA - 32 km (20 miles) SE (135 degrees)
Greenwater, WA - 32 km (20 miles) SSW (199 degrees)
Tacoma, WA - 68 km (42 miles) SE (127 degrees)
Coordinates 46 deg. 52.3 min. N (46.871N), 121 deg. 45.1 min. W (121.751W)
Depth 0.6 km (0.4 miles)
Location Quality Good
Location Quality Parameters Nst= 28, Nph= 28, Dmin=1 km, Rmss=0.18 sec, Erho=0.5 km, Erzz=0 km, Gp=68.4 degrees
Event ID# uw10251026
pnsn

Also this:

A micro earthquake occurred at 6:29:46 AM (PDT) on Sunday, October 23, 2011. The magnitude 1.8 event occurred 1 km (0 miles) SW of Mount St. Helens Volcano, WA. The hypocentral depth is 0.5 km (0.3 miles).

pnsn
edit on 25-10-2011 by zenius because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 25 2011 @ 05:37 PM
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And now:
2.2 - duration magnitude (Md)
Time Tuesday, October 25, 2011 at 2:09:59 PM (PDT)
Tuesday, October 25, 2011 at 21:09:59 (UTC)
Distance from Ashford, WA - 7 km (5 miles) E (97 degrees)
Elbe, WA - 21 km (13 miles) E (95 degrees)
Eatonville, WA - 30 km (18 miles) ESE (117 degrees)
Tacoma, WA - 68 km (42 miles) SE (143 degrees)
Coordinates 46 deg. 44.9 min. N (46.748N), 121 deg. 55.5 min. W (121.924W)
Depth 8.6 km (5.3 miles)
Location Quality Good
Location Quality Parameters Nst= 14, Nph= 14, Dmin=8 km, Rmss=0.14 sec, Erho=1 km, Erzz=0 km, Gp=140.4 degrees
Event ID# uw10252109

I think that's close enough to the mountain to bear consideration.

pnsn



posted on Oct, 25 2011 @ 11:54 PM
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reply to post by zenius
 


Thanks Zenius! you beat me to it. Yes, most definately bears consideration. That last one is the same area of the others.

Now. The nearest station to it has some very odd signatures on it:

seismo

What in the the world is that? When that link expires you can find it here under LO2


It doesn't look like the typical inteference to me. It shows up on one other station.



posted on Oct, 26 2011 @ 06:00 AM
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reply to post by westcoast
 


I've got to ask Westcoast, have your dogs been acting up much lately? Have you noticed any more rumblings? I was going through the pnsn stations and Mt Baker to Mt Hood and even as far as west of Mt Shasta, seem to be a little grumpy. I checked Weather Underground for a few of the areas and not much above a 20km/h wind gust. Surely that's not enough to upset the stations?

I'm wondering whether there's a little bit of adjusting going on beneath you?



posted on Oct, 26 2011 @ 06:25 AM
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reply to post by westcoast
 


Apart from the bit where Pierce Brosnan manages to drive successfully over lava!



posted on Oct, 26 2011 @ 11:49 PM
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reply to post by Flavian
 


LOL....Pierce Bronsan can do ANYTHING he wants!!!!
(I am from the Remington Steele era)

As to my dogs...yeah, been acting a bit restless lately. My big quake dog has been on edge (barking easily) and my little dog keeps staring at the floor again, up in my face at other times. I heard/felt a very large boom last night at about 12:30 am....sounded like an explosion, but nothing in the news today.



posted on Oct, 27 2011 @ 05:59 AM
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reply to post by westcoast
 


Why is it that the webis from the page with the map of stations always look worse than the webis from the volcano webis page? RCM & STAR look alot worse on the webis from the station map.



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