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The Moon Challenge

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posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 09:14 PM
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Originally posted by CLPrime
It's on Flickr because it's NASA's Flickr photostream.
As I said, I didn't doubt that it was a NASA image.

But I had no idea that NASA posted their images on Flickr, I thought they posted their images on NASA websites.

I still learn things every day.

edit on 14-10-2011 by Arbitrageur because: clarification




posted on Oct, 15 2011 @ 07:39 AM
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reply to post by Arbitrageur
 


NASA has been using many sites to keep "in touch" with the public (like many companies do), with YouTube, UStream, Facebook, Twitter, Flickr, etc. accounts.



posted on Oct, 15 2011 @ 07:40 AM
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I'm sorry freedommusic, but you are bragging on your images that are clearly out of focus? No offense, but you must be kidding or have some serious hate on NASA.



posted on Oct, 15 2011 @ 01:04 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


There seems to be some confusion here. First of all the best NASA image I have seen to date is the one I posted from JPL here:



The green blue/purple color I was referring to is evident in this above image. I have since found that filters were used.



This picture contains images through the Violet, 756 nm, 968 nm filters. The color is 'enhanced' in the sense that the CCD camera is sensitive to near infrared wavelengths of light beyond human vision.


So the colors were enhanced. When I fist looked at this image I hadn't read the description.

The entire point of my post was that it was actually very difficult to find a color, high res, high def photo of the moon.

As far as bragging goes, this has also been misconstrued. I am not a photographer. I am simply a guy who went out and took a picture of the moon and then had a thought. Are there any good HD color photos of the moon?

No one has really provide one. I have since examined the Clementine mapping photos and they are simply extremely poor and full of blurred out regions.

This image also meets the challenge:



But is this the best data after 43 years of exploration?

I think the data that is available is not high quality and is simply unacceptable.



posted on Oct, 15 2011 @ 01:13 PM
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Another point I would like to make is this.

It is difficult to see the color of celestial bodies from a distance.

For example here is a photo from the ISS orbiting earth:



It looks gray, white, and faded blue.

So I wondered what the REAL colors of the moon are, hence the request for a HD color image.



posted on Oct, 15 2011 @ 02:09 PM
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Originally posted by freedommusic
There seems to be some confusion here.
I agree, rephrasing your challenge could help.


First of all the best NASA image I have seen to date is the one I posted from JPL here:

I disagree, that image is far from the best, in my opinion. Just look at the "edges" of the Moon and you can see that it looks like it was cropped to look round.


The green blue/purple color I was referring to is evident in this above image. I have since found that filters were used.
Yes, that's not a true colour image (or even near true colour), seeing that it was made with wavelengths we do not see, making it impossible for us to see it looking like that.


So the colors were enhanced. When I fist looked at this image I hadn't read the description.
No, the colours were not enhanced, they call it "enhanced colour" because it has colours we do not see, but the result is not the same as using natural colours, like the photo posted by Arbitrageur shows.


The entire point of my post was that it was actually very difficult to find a color, high res, high def photo of the moon.
It's not, it took me five minutes to find the ones I posted.


No one has really provide one. I have since examined the Clementine mapping photos and they are simply extremely poor and full of blurred out regions.
Several members provided NASA colour images that are better than the one you posted, but as you haven't explained how do you classify an image as "better" than others, trying to find a photo that follows your unknown rules for a "better" photo is useless.


This image also meets the challenge:



But is this the best data after 43 years of exploration?
Probably not, but not knowing exactly what you want it's a little difficult to find it.


I think the data that is available is not high quality and is simply unacceptable.
Unacceptable for what, making posters?



posted on Oct, 17 2011 @ 09:26 AM
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I don't know why but i like the picture from NASA better even if it is colourised :p but i guess its interesting to know they don't give out unprocessed pictures so much. I'm guessing the colours help them to show the indents and the more "interesting parts" better. And that seems more interesting than a big far of shot of the moon :p



posted on Oct, 18 2011 @ 12:35 AM
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Originally posted by freedommusic
... image of the moon taken by NASA




Ok, we're now onto page three of this thread but its not been answered yet WHY anyone cares about whether NASA has a high resolution image of the moon.
Although NASA does do some astronomy, their primary focus is on space exploration. Taking a clear photo of the moon *from earth* would IMHO be a complete total waste of time for them.
This focus on NASA as the one and only leader in everything to do with space is misleading, and during the comet Elenin fuss, also let people to mistakenly demand NASA produce photos of that comet. Like the orbital elements, it is NOT one of their tasks.



posted on Oct, 18 2011 @ 01:44 AM
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Originally posted by freedommusic
Now here are some good pics:


From Galileo:
www.thelivingmoon.com...

The Galileo image doesn't qualify because half of the moon is in darkness.

From Clementine:

ser.sese.asu.edu... (32M)

Problem w/ the Clementine image is there are blur streaks all over it. Doesn't qualify either.

Now it was extremely difficult to find these images.

How many folks realized the moon is green?


edit on 14-10-2011 by freedommusic because: (no reason given)

edit on 14-10-2011 by freedommusic because: (no reason given)


Hi freedomusic,

I looked at your image in photoshop and couldn't detect a significant overdensity of green, as shown in these histograms:



Nevertheless, if that is what you're seeing in your photographs, have you considered that maybe your optics / telescope are filtering the light in such a way to produce a greenish image? Perhaps from chromatic aberration from your refractive lenses? Surely you've taken this into account?



Originally posted by freedommusic
reply to post by ArMaP
 


There seems to be some confusion here. First of all the best NASA image I have seen to date is the one I posted from JPL here:



The green blue/purple color I was referring to is evident in this above image. I have since found that filters were used.



This picture contains images through the Violet, 756 nm, 968 nm filters. The color is 'enhanced' in the sense that the CCD camera is sensitive to near infrared wavelengths of light beyond human vision.


So the colors were enhanced. When I fist looked at this image I hadn't read the description.


Any photometric astronomy picture you find will be filtered, in fact. It turns out that it's more scientifically useful for everyone to take their pictures through a set of standard filters (and calibrate accordingly) rather than just take plaincolor images. This allows us a way to calibrate wavelength response across the multiple, different CCDs, telescopes, lenses and reflectors that necessarily make up any different telescope configuration.

When you see pictures from the Hubble telescope, it's actually three different pictures taken through three different filters and then combined to create a "normal" RGB picture.

The only "plain color" images you will find will necessarily be amateur, or made by astronauts not as part of their routine science duties.

As for why we don't point the hubble at the moon: for the same reason we don't point it at the sun, or the earth. You'd blow it right out.
edit on 18-10-2011 by wirehead because: fixed image link

edit on 18-10-2011 by wirehead because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 2 2011 @ 02:18 PM
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Load this image and then magnify it. I think the Moon is this color, a light brown, though Earthshine may be affecting it. The colors on the flag look true, whites are white. It doesn't look gray or silver like it does from Earth.
spaceflight.nasa.gov...



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