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South African cave yields paint from dawn of humanity

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posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 08:54 AM
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ww w.washingtonpost.com



Traces of paint on the tools show that the cave-dwellers mixed ochre — red or yellow minerals that contain metal oxides — with bone marrow, charcoal, flecks of quartz, and a liquid, probably water. Paint experts at the Louvre in Paris performed the analysis



This deliberate mixture “implies that people at the time had complex cognition,” said Lyn Wadley, an archaeologist at the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg. Wadley studies early ochre paint but was not involved in the research. “They could . . . multitask and think in abstract terms,” Wadley said.



This is an amazing find. This predates any discovery by 30-40k years.

As the article states, the earliest known cave paintings are in France, which are 35,000 years old. If they do manage to find any cave paintings(which I would be surprised as its a seaside cliff) then it would surpass the French caves by 65,000 years.

This was a deliberate mixture, there have been a lot of signs lately that the cave men were a lot more advanced then we give them credit for.
This changes how the origins of Homo Sapien are viewed both cognitive and culture.

There have been many discoveries at this cave, including beads and jewelry, which might indicate status of the wearers and some form of language.

If you want to read more on the beads, here is a nice NatGeo article.

natgeo.




posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 08:58 AM
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I was reading about this earlier today and it is pretty amazing. I love the old cave art, it seems alive somehow. Hopefully, in the not too distant future, we will also discover a preserved mix of what they were chewing to make such funky pictures!



posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 09:00 AM
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I cannot believe how long some crushed cobbled together paints can survive in a cave. Here I am having to repaint my deck and lawn furniture every year!



posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 10:11 AM
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reply to post by jjkenobi
 


*laughs*

you have a point there.

I find it amazing they can find a shell and some stones and paint, intact, after 100,000 years.

Now caves just preserve things well. Maybe you can keep your lawn furniture in a cave.



posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 10:24 AM
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If they were really to be dated at 100k ybp they wouldn't be homo sapiens' tho.
At least not according to the out of africa theory.
Right?



posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 11:04 AM
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reply to post by AurelioMaghe
 


They said it was right as Homo Sapiens emerged:


A hundred thousand years ago, not long after Homo sapiens emerged as a species, a craftsman — or woman — sat in a cave overlooking the Indian Ocean, crushed a soft rusty red rock, mixed it inside a shell with charcoal and animal marrow, and dabbed it on something — maybe a face, maybe a wall.



posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 11:43 AM
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Originally posted by nixie_nox
reply to post by AurelioMaghe
 


They said it was right as Homo Sapiens emerged:


A hundred thousand years ago, not long after Homo sapiens emerged as a species, a craftsman — or woman — sat in a cave overlooking the Indian Ocean, crushed a soft rusty red rock, mixed it inside a shell with charcoal and animal marrow, and dabbed it on something — maybe a face, maybe a wall.

This is kinda embarassing to say but I was convinced the cave was in Australia not South Africa.
Even if it's in the title.
I don't know where I got that, I blame my phone.
I even went to check the Recent Out of Africa theory about the date just to be sure and all.
Sorry everybody.
edit on 14-10-2011 by AurelioMaghe because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 03:29 PM
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Just a short comment

The line at which we say man is no longer archaic but now HSS is an academic one. There wouldn't be a sharp line between the two populations. Even if modern man came from a series of successful mutants that mutation would take a long time to spread through the entire population.



posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 10:40 PM
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The age of this, if correct, is truly amazing! I think most of us are in agreement that tribes, groups, and possibly civilizations of the ancient world are much much older than science traditionally teaches. Not only older, but more advanced than we give them credit for.

It would not surprise me if at some point archaeologists unearth a written language on some ancient skins or something, lol. That would actually surprise me.



posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 11:37 PM
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reply to post by AurelioMaghe
 

According to the Y chromosome and DNA research modern humans appeared in Africa up to 120 000 years before present.
www.scienceinafrica.co.za...

These people would have been the ancestors of the San people (Bushmen).
These hunter-gatherers lived throughout southern Africa until they were regionally displaced by the herders, migratory agriculturalists from the Congo and white colonialists.

The southern San (or !Xam) still practiced rock painting until the late 19th century.

Interestingly the San are considered the oldest population group on earth:
www.independent.co.uk...

For an interesting introduction to San rock art:
www.theartofafrica.co.za...


edit on 14-10-2011 by halfoldman because: (no reason given)

edit on 14-10-2011 by halfoldman because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 15 2011 @ 12:27 AM
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Whats sad about this story/thread is that they have an expert from Rome examine and comment on the art, yet they dont even venture to speak to the local tribal leaders who's ancestors were responsible for the paintings. Instead we look at the findings of a white chap from another continent and all nod in agreement that we now know every thing we need to. PS OP; I would advise you to read Indaby My Children by Credo Mutwa. I doesnt have anything to do with cave paintings nor is it a factual history book. Instead these are the African tales that have been passed down the centuries. The Egyptians had papyrus, the Inka stones. The black African are the only ones who kept their history alive by telling stories to the younger generation around a fire. Throughout the generations not a word is added or a sentance removed. Its an amazing book, like Lord of the Rings, Twilight, Harry Potter, Diskworld but with an African twist. I read it every 3 years just for fun. Its epic!


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



posted on Oct, 15 2011 @ 07:00 AM
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also the australian aborigine



posted on Oct, 15 2011 @ 10:58 AM
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Very interesting stuff. Was wondering... They found this mixture on the cave walls and determined mankind stirred it up and painted it on. I couldn't find pics, and only skimmed the article, I confess. Were there designs painted on the cave walls? Paintings of animals, etc? Or was is 'a coat of paint' painted as a layer on the interior cave wall? If the latter, I just wonder how they can say for sure that these elements of nature didn't somehow 'merge' naturally into this paint-like compound (like due to temperature, degradation of certain matter, etc.)

I guess I'm asking, how do they KNOW that mankind stirred the mixture and painted it on?

It's certainly plausible to me, and I would like to believe it.



posted on Oct, 15 2011 @ 11:29 AM
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Originally posted by new_here
Very interesting stuff. Was wondering... They found this mixture on the cave walls and determined mankind stirred it up and painted it on. I couldn't find pics, and only skimmed the article, I confess. Were there designs painted on the cave walls? Paintings of animals, etc? Or was is 'a coat of paint' painted as a layer on the interior cave wall? If the latter, I just wonder how they can say for sure that these elements of nature didn't somehow 'merge' naturally into this paint-like compound (like due to temperature, degradation of certain matter, etc.)

I guess I'm asking, how do they KNOW that mankind stirred the mixture and painted it on?

It's certainly plausible to me, and I would like to believe it.


Not to be curlish but - you could read the article, lol but nonetheless here is the germane parts:


A hundred thousand years ago, not long after Homo sapiens emerged as a species, a craftsman — or woman — sat in a cave overlooking the Indian Ocean, crushed a soft rusty red rock, mixed it inside a shell with charcoal and animal marrow, and dabbed it on something — maybe a face, maybe a wall.

Before the person left, he or she stacked the shell and grindstones in a neat pile, where they lay undisturbed for a hundred millennia.



these paint “tool kits,” researchers say, push deeper into human history the evidence for artistic impulses and complex, planned behavior. Previously, the oldest evidence of ochre paint was found at another site in South Africa dated to about 60,000 years ago.

Traces of paint on the tools show that the cave-dwellers mixed ochre — red or yellow minerals that contain metal oxides — with bone marrow, charcoal, flecks of quartz, and a liquid, probably water. Paint experts at the Louvre in Paris performed the analysis.

With ground ochre as the base, the marrow and charcoal acted as binders. The quartz could have made the compound sticky, with water — in the right amount — providing the proper consistency.

edit on 15/10/11 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 15 2011 @ 11:40 AM
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Originally posted by Monkeygod333
Whats sad about this story/thread is that they have an expert from Rome examine and comment on the art, yet they dont even venture to speak to the local tribal leaders who's ancestors were responsible for the paintings. Instead we look at the findings of a white chap from another continent and all nod in agreement that we now know every thing we need to.



Paris actually, unless you are referring to another article and not the two in the first post?


The cave walls show no paintings, but quickly accreting limestone would have obscured any obvious signs, Henshilwood said.


The expert you disapprove of analyized the following:


Traces of paint on the tools show that the cave-dwellers mixed ochre — red or yellow minerals that contain metal oxides — with bone marrow, charcoal, flecks of quartz, and a liquid, probably water. Paint experts at the Louvre in Paris performed the analysis.



posted on Oct, 15 2011 @ 12:04 PM
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Originally posted by AurelioMaghe
If they were really to be dated at 100k ybp they wouldn't be homo sapiens' tho.
At least not according to the out of africa theory.
Right?


Then we are wrong.

next.



posted on Oct, 15 2011 @ 12:17 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 

Ok, thanks. Sorry for being lazy. I actually fell asleep skimming the link last night, and this morning found I'd left this thread's tab open. So, yeah, way cool and thanks for spoon-feeding me, LoL! Truly a fascinating prospect to think upon.



posted on Oct, 16 2011 @ 08:40 PM
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reply to post by Monkeygod333
 

hey can you post a link to the article your talkng about



posted on Oct, 17 2011 @ 04:31 PM
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Additional photographs of the 'paint mixture' in situ



Painting At Blombos Cave


At 100,000 years old, the tool kits from Blombos are the earliest such found to date: but ochre use for pigments dates back at least another 200,000 years before that



posted on Oct, 17 2011 @ 08:14 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


Thank you for all the information ad clarification Hans.



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