It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Does Sirius and the Earth star system have a link?

page: 1
7

log in

join
share:

posted on Oct, 13 2011 @ 11:58 PM
link   
Hi there ATSers,

Here I am again with many questions concerning our surrounding here in 3D. According to some theories it is said that the Earth and Sirius star system have a link because of them being a binary star system. Now, what is a binary star system? According to NASA:


'Binary' just means having two parts, and you will find it used in many places (whenever there are two of something) and not just in connection with stars.


Although, the website also states that :

When two things are close together, the effect each other in many ways, and we can learn a lot from those effects. For example, two stars close together exert a gravitational pull



In other words, the fact of having a double (binary) star system would mean to have 2 stars that have a certain attraction within each other. A great example would be Albireo (Albireo A and B) which is a binary star system composed of two stars in the constellation of Cygnus. (for more informations here are some links to wikipedia that might be informative: Albireo and Cygnus constellation





This one is a constellation Cygnus plus the animal drawn around the brightest star of the constellation to help figuring out how it looks like.

On a sky map it would look like this:







Here is an example of a binary star system. The fact it seems near could is although confusing because many light years could actually separate the two stars.





Here is a view of Albireo, binary star system.

According to NASA also :


What percentage of the stars are binary systems? The Answer Somebody once said that "2 out of every 3 stars are in a binary". Seriously, the fraction is very high, but it's difficult to be precise, because it's difficult to prove that a certain star is definitely single. Of the stars nearest to the Sun, about half are known to be in multiple systems. Koji Mukai



Which means it is highly probable that our star system is a binary one with Sirius from the previous sentences of North American Space Agency. This is not absolute, but it is good probability. Add to this fact that Plut9o's orbit is the one out of all our other planets here in the solar system with an orbit different from the others. (Pluto is now categorized as a dwarf planet by the way).

It then that means something else is having a great gravitational field pulling it from it's trajectory.



Then what could cause this dwarf planet to have an out of ordinary orbit is the question?

Some might say Nibiru/Elenin, others might say, bah ... who cares, and others might just think this is normal, but in the end something is definitely doing the thing. What is your take on this one guys and do you think Sirius star system and our has a link?

This is open to speculation folks,




Thruthseek3r




edit on 14-10-2011 by thruthseek3r because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 12:41 AM
link   
reply to post by thruthseek3r
 


Sirius, the brightest star in the night sky!

Sirius A and B (possibly C, if it even exists) have always intrigued me. It is unusual for our star to be solitary, so perhaps it does have a double lurking somewhere in the outer reaches of space. There seems to be a reoccurring theme of duality in nature (the Ancient Egyptians heavily capitalized on this dualistic theme in nature). But have you heard about the Dogon Tribe in Mali, West Africa?



posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 12:45 AM
link   
reply to post by thruthseek3r
 


I don't think there is a physical link in that way. Sirius is a binary system itself (actually, probably a ternary system actually) all in close orbit. Our solar system, for all intents and purposes seems to be completely detached from Sirius. Our solar system is also (as far as NASA and other space agencies / researchers can tell) far older than the Sirius system (billions of years old vs. a couple hundred million years.)

Now, as to whether there is some other kind of link (ancestral/extraterrestrial, etc.) - there's no real evidence, but the ancients seemed far more interested in the system than they should have been simply because its the brightest star in the night sky. Besides the Egyptians, check out the Dogon tribe of Mali.



posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 12:46 AM
link   
Hi truthseek3r
Interesting OP. I'd like to know the source of the Sirius theories because to me it doesn't make any sense. Sirius is about 8.6 light years away, which although relatively close, is too far away for us to be linked to it and it already has a binary companion 'Sirius B' whose distance from Sirius varies between 8.1 and 31.5 AU.

(AU= Astronomical Unit which is the mean distance of the Earth to the Sun which is 93,000,000 miles).

Sirius Wiki

Also, you're confusing binary systems with visual binaries when you state that stars could be several light years apart in binary systems. With visual binaries, that can be the case because the stars aren't connected at all and it's merely a line of site effect.

Binary systems though, comprise of stars that are close together as in the Sirius A and Sirus B example above and they orbit around their common centre of mass. Clearly stars light years apart are too distant from each other for this to happen.

Binary Stars Wiki

Regarding Plutos orbit, Pluto is very small, it wouldn't take much of an impact to disrupt an ordinary orbit (if it ever had one). Also due to its small size and mass it wouldn't take much to alter its orbit. It's quite likely there are other 'dwarf planets' out in the Kuiper Belt that are quite capable of doing this. Either of these expanations or even both combined could accout for Pluto's orbit.

Of course there could be other explanations...
edit on 14/10/11 by Insomniac because: Spelling and punctuation. I've been at work all night.



posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 04:17 AM
link   
The closest neighbor of the Sun is Proxima Centauri. 4.22 light years away. How does Sirius have more effect ?



posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 04:45 AM
link   
reply to post by IEtherianSoul9
 


I think the Dogon's is more of a case of only being told one side of the story, and the Von Daniken side at that. It would seem that the Dogons knowledge of Sirius came from what was then current day knowledge in Europe, it wasn't groundbreaking or even up to scratch with what we know today. I find it odd that aliens who travelled the universe only had the knowledge of early 20th century human knowledge.



posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 05:34 AM
link   
Needs more physics.

All stars are gravitationally attracted to one another, regardless of distance. That doesn't make them binary pairs. The only "link" between stars is gravitational attraction. (You make it sound like some kind of wormhole...)

If Sol was a binary pair with some other star, they would be in SOME KIND of mutual orbit about the center of mass. Any star in a binary pair with Sol would appear to be orbiting us, and would travel a great deal around the sky. Sirius, being in a "fixed constellation" of stars on the order of centuries or millenia (meaning holding the same position in the sky from our perspective) is certainly NOT a binary pair with Sol.

If Sol has a binary pair, it MUST BE moving with respect to the other stuff in the sky, "orbiting us" like a planet orbits, except more slowly and really orbiting a mutual center of mass between the stars. If such a thing exists, it is not very visible and has not been found.



posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 06:24 AM
link   
Can't be Sirius!

This is a case of selective cherry picking incomplete descriptions that support a hypothesis while ignoring the extended or fuller meanings that don't.

By the modern definition, the term binary star is generally restricted to pairs of stars that revolve around a common center of mass. But there are at least 6 other stars closer to Sol than Sirius, and by what observations does it suggest now or historically that Sol and Sirius are gravitationally locked to a barycenter? One would think our view of the local neighborhood would be radically different over the millenniums, and ancient star maps would be radically different than what research in this field suggests, that the most visible close stars have not migrated in the night sky over thousands of years to suggest orbit. Distant stars in the night sky have shown great difference from our stellar neighborhood though.

Also, nice exaggeration of the orbit of Pluto to also bend facts to support a particular point that sounds remotely related but is an abomination of orbital science, as nearly all trans-Neptunian bodies have elliptical orbits much more radicle than Pluto's, like er um, comets, Eris for instance is larger than Pluto and has a much greater elliptical orbit, since 1992 nearly a thousand of trans-Neptunian bodies are known with many given names; such as Chaos, Deucalion, Huya, Ixion, Makemake, Orcus, Quaoar, Rhadamanthus, Sedna, and Varuna.

If one needs a large mass, brown dwarf, or binary star to make sense of distant body's orbital trajectories around the sun then that is a personal choice one makes, not necessarily an astrophysics criteria. But selecting a known binary or triunal stellar system like Sirius, rather tightly packed, and over 4 billion years younger, and ignoring the closer multiple system such as Alpha Centauri, twice as close, and observed that Alpha Centauri A and B complete their close 11-some AU proximity orbit in about 80 years, closer to the age of Sol by over 4 billion years, is a reach to say the least, unsupported in general, and nearly an abomination of the science of astrophysics at most.

Somebody once said that "2 out of every 3 stars are in a binary". Seriously, the fraction is very high, but it's difficult to be precise, because it's difficult to prove that a certain star is definitely single. Of the stars nearest to the Sun, about half are known to be in multiple systems.

Why do people so need our sun to be part of a binary star?



posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 09:00 AM
link   

Originally posted by IEtherianSoul9
reply to post by thruthseek3r
 


Sirius, the brightest star in the night sky!

Sirius A and B (possibly C, if it even exists) have always intrigued me. It is unusual for our star to be solitary, so perhaps it does have a double lurking somewhere in the outer reaches of space. There seems to be a reoccurring theme of duality in nature (the Ancient Egyptians heavily capitalized on this dualistic theme in nature). But have you heard about the Dogon Tribe in Mali, West Africa?


Yes I have heard about the Dogon which had knowledge about astronomy which was impossible that have during an era where they had no technological way to understand what they knew. This is very intriguing to be honest. I think there is more to it than what we are being told. I am looking to understanding about it as I consider this as key to our understanding of our real place here in milky way.


Thruthseek3r



posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 09:09 AM
link   
reply to post by Illustronic
 


Again this is a theory so I do not pretend myself having the absolute truth. This is a case of me, trying to understand your theories on the subject to make me think and all. My premise is the sun is linked with Sirius and again this is only a premise, I did not had the time to make plenty hours of research about it. Although i am on a quest of understanding what affects Pluto's orbit and as well understanding if Sirius truly have a correlation with us.

This is a feeling I have into my gut even if i can not prove it. Thanks for your comments, I'll continue working and assembling some evidence to back-up my theory of even negate my theory if that is the case. As you can see, the two sides of the medal are to consider.



Thruthseek3r



posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 09:29 AM
link   

Originally posted by Illustronic
By the modern definition, the term binary star is generally restricted to pairs of stars that revolve around a common center of mass.

Indeed, which is not the case for our solar system with respect to Sirius. Sirius has a proper motion of 1.2 arcseconds/year in declination and .546 arcseconds per year in right ascension (15 km/sec and 6.8 km/sec respectively). Since we're about 8.6 light years from the Sirius system, and since Sirius A and B have a combined mass of nearly 3 times the sun's mass, the escape velocity from Sirius at the distance of our sun is about 0.1 km/sec. In other words, our solar system is traveling many times too fast relative to Sirius to be able to orbit it, therefore we are not in a "binary" (trinary would be the correct term) with Sirius.



posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 09:49 AM
link   
reply to post by IEtherianSoul9
 


Actually in our galactic neighborhood solitary star systems are more common than multiple star systems. It would also be exceedingly rare for our star to have a binary that is not also a yellow dwarf.



posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 05:12 PM
link   
Well I think it would be a rare discovery if a star the mass of our sun, was in a multiple star system with a much more massive binary–(or more), extraordinarily younger star with a distance of 8.6 light years in a rather crowded stellar neighborhood. Maybe somewhere way out from the galactic center, or in between the galactic arms, or above or below the galactic plane, we could discover such a thing but I doubt it's this close to home. All of our observations suggest otherwise.



posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 10:18 PM
link   

Originally posted by IEtherianSoul9
reply to post by thruthseek3r
 


Sirius, the brightest star in the night sky!

Sirius A and B (possibly C, if it even exists) have always intrigued me. It is unusual for our star to be solitary, so perhaps it does have a double lurking somewhere in the outer reaches of space. There seems to be a reoccurring theme of duality in nature (the Ancient Egyptians heavily capitalized on this dualistic theme in nature). But have you heard about the Dogon Tribe in Mali, West Africa?


Yes!!

They knew of Sirius A, B, and C looong time ago....we, in the last few decades, are just recently learning of it.

How would they know of this star system without the use of telescopes?? I say they got that knowledge from gods who came to Earth.



posted on Aug, 16 2015 @ 10:16 PM
link   
I do not think how ever we could be a triple star system if my theory the Sirius we could be in a way we do have ties the way to finger out if we are we would have to find out if our sun is being tugged of we are a trinity we would not know do to where we are in the system I do feel we are but we world need hard evidence to prove it to the scientific community and that is not easy



posted on Aug, 17 2015 @ 05:56 PM
link   
At approximately 8.60 light years away from the Sun, Sirius is not our binary star in any way, shape, or form. There is no effective gravitational interaction between them, seeing how the Sun is much closer to the Alpha Centauri system (which includes Proxima Centauri), and is still pretty much unaffected by it. The Sun is a loner.

Having said that, there might be a possibility that the Sun had a "companion" when it formed, and that companion star ot brown dwarf got ejected far away from the Sun by gravitational interactions. Stars usually form in clusters, anyway.

In the Solar System's past, at least one star (and perhaps several more at different times) travelled past us at a fairly close distance, which caused some effects in our system. Sirius was not one of them, it has always been at a respectful disance from us.
edit on 17-8-2015 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 17 2015 @ 06:14 PM
link   
a reply to: pazcat

Sirius is a binary star system
Sirius A being the brightest star in the night sky to the naked eye
B being a white dwarf with an immense gravitational pull on A

The Sun resides in the Orion Arm of the Milky Way
Some of the closest brightest stars to the Sun are Sirius Aldebaran in Taurus Rigel in Orion Castor and Pollux in Gemini etc
Yet our true constellation are composed of these stars as they are relatively close with the addition of The sword of Orion our closest Stellar Nursery
These stars were called the Duat stars by Ancient Egyptians

There are many myths regarding Sirius (Isis)
Myths that speak of visitors from the Sirius star system which invokes the idea of a planet in that system known as Sorgum Female or the planet onto which souls are born.
This myth also speaks of the Sun and Sirius being born out of the same nebula

So yes there is a mythological connection at least




edit on 17-8-2015 by artistpoet because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 17 2015 @ 09:33 PM
link   
The problem with Sirius is that it is the wrong class ("A"), and far too young. Sirius is a class "A" star that is on the order of half a billion years old...in planetary terms; barely formed, IF it is finished forming. Planets can take a long time t form. Earth was barely forced when the Moon was made at around 500 million years...it took another 4 billion years for intelligent life to evolve.

Although; very near Sirius is a star called Nu (2) Canis Majoris it is a class "K" star, that might support life. Unfortunately it is also a 'sub giant". This kind of begs the question; "How long might a star remain in such a state?"

An amphibious / reptilian species is reported in the myth of several Terrestrial cultures. The Dogon Tibe of Africa has a rich mythology centered on the "Nommo"; a species supposedly from Sirius.

Ancient India also has mythology that supports a "blue skinned" species from Sirius. The species of these two seem very close.

There are other cultures that have mythologies about Sirius, so it does seem reasonable to think there may be something t these mythologies.


edit on 17-8-2015 by tanka418 because: (no reason given)



new topics




 
7

log in

join