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First telescope, which one should I get?

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posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 10:51 AM
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Originally posted by Metal Head
I'm going to get some Celestron SkyMaster 25-125x80mm Zoom Binoculars they are supposed to be good enough to see Saturns rings. Be great for star gazing and recon for WTSHTF scenarios. You can get them for about $100.
edit on 13-10-2011 by Metal Head because: forgot something


on a dark night with my 6in i can see saturns rings and moons. its great. I love showing people and they line up to check it out




posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 02:52 PM
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reply to post by camaro68ss
 


some great advice in this thread. I just want to add one more, if you look for a newtonian (most Dobsonians are Newtonians), just be careful of some marketing hype. Don't go for an F4.0 scope, as you will spend a lot of time collimating it. All mirror telescopes, esp. fast Newtonians need this. If you rather go for a slower like F4.5 or slower scope, the collimation is much less critical. (I am speaking now from memory, had my F4.0 telescope long time ago, but to get acceptable results, all the mirrors had to be aligned to something like 0.5mm!!!). great if you have the time AND you bought a collimator with the telescope.

The F-ratio of a telescope is NOT like the F-stop of a camera. The focal ratio of the telescope is the focal length divided by the diameter of the mirror, i.e. a 200mm mirror (8") with an 800mm focal length will give you a F4.0 telescope
edit on 14/10/2011 by Hellhound604 because: added the last part



posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 06:06 PM
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Originally posted by Hellhound604
reply to post by camaro68ss
 


some great advice in this thread. I just want to add one more, if you look for a newtonian (most Dobsonians are Newtonians), just be careful of some marketing hype. Don't go for an F4.0 scope, as you will spend a lot of time collimating it. All mirror telescopes, esp. fast Newtonians need this. If you rather go for a slower like F4.5 or slower scope, the collimation is much less critical. (I am speaking now from memory, had my F4.0 telescope long time ago, but to get acceptable results, all the mirrors had to be aligned to something like 0.5mm!!!). great if you have the time AND you bought a collimator with the telescope.

The F-ratio of a telescope is NOT like the F-stop of a camera. The focal ratio of the telescope is the focal length divided by the diameter of the mirror, i.e. a 200mm mirror (8") with an 800mm focal length will give you a F4.0 telescope
edit on 14/10/2011 by Hellhound604 because: added the last part


This is good to know because I was actuallu looking at the F4.0`s..thanks.



posted on Oct, 15 2011 @ 09:30 AM
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reply to post by lbndhr
 


Yes, that was a trap I fell into when I bought my first real telescope. The F4.0 Newtonian was quite a lot cheaper than the F5.0, and more practical to transport, but collimating the mirrors was a b*tch. I had to recollimate everytime I took my telescope somewhere else, and in the end that telescope ended up in the attic. Also, coma's are quite severe on a fast telescope like that.



posted on Oct, 15 2011 @ 08:03 PM
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Originally posted by Hellhound604
reply to post by lbndhr
 


Yes, that was a trap I fell into when I bought my first real telescope. The F4.0 Newtonian was quite a lot cheaper than the F5.0, and more practical to transport, but collimating the mirrors was a b*tch. I had to recollimate everytime I took my telescope somewhere else, and in the end that telescope ended up in the attic. Also, coma's are quite severe on a fast telescope like that.


What is a coma?



posted on Oct, 16 2011 @ 03:50 PM
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reply to post by lbndhr
 


only stars close to the optical axis appear as pinpoint images, the further from the optical center the stars are, the more spread out they appear.

www.opticalmechanics.com...
www.skyandtelescope.com...



posted on Oct, 16 2011 @ 04:08 PM
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reply to post by Hellhound604
 


ok, then this telescope I'm highly considering has that cp.a fix on it. It is the Celestron ETX-80AT Astro telescope with autostar controller, any opinion on this one as a first telescope?



posted on Oct, 16 2011 @ 04:23 PM
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Originally posted by lbndhr
reply to post by Hellhound604
 


ok, then this telescope I'm highly considering has that cp.a fix on it. It is the Celestron ETX-80AT Astro telescope with autostar controller, any opinion on this one as a first telescope?


I guess you mean the Meade ETX-80AT. It will give you very good planetary views (better than a reflector), but does not quite have the light-gathering of a large reflector. Also, because it has an alt-az mount, the field will rotate as it tracks the stars, so you can't use it for very long exposures, but don't despair, you can still take lots of short-exposures, and then use some software like Registax or Aip4Win to de-rotate the stack
..... but it is a very nice telescope, from what I have heard


You will see, if the bug bites you, you will end up with at least 2 scopes, a small portable one, and a large light-bucket that is NOT portable, lol .... good luck. It is a great hobby
edit on 16/10/2011 by Hellhound604 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 16 2011 @ 04:51 PM
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reply to post by Hellhound604
 


your right its the Meade, it also comes with the moon filter, and has an added feature I switch it to a nature scope, I will go back and look at the specs I think it has ability to be used manually, tea king off setting, but ya I'm ordering it and will be using it by weeks end, and as for a second,yep already researching the next level for mid next year. Thanks for the time on advising me,this isn't a fast puck decision, I want best I can get for reasonable price to being me into space. Peace



posted on Oct, 18 2011 @ 04:58 AM
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my two cents of advice...:
if this is really something you like, and u are sure u'll like it for a long time, get it as big as u can... Get a used 12 inch, meade or celestron... the bigger the mor eu can see and explore.... keep this in mind because since on the web u can find anything un in the sky with all the various hubble pictures ecc, the fun part is seeing things live, with yo own eyes and not in a picture. so, if u dont get it big, u'll see very little, u'll get bored and think u wasted ur money... for 6.000 euros or less ( 8.000 usd ) u can get a good used 12 inch, even for less....
Surf Ebay and thise kind of places... get it second hand... that's all cheers and have fun !!!



posted on Oct, 18 2011 @ 07:07 AM
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reply to post by shasa
 


If only I had that much $$$$. for knwo I will go with the 10in a bit smaller but good enough to get me understanding the skies, and save for the real deal, big girl telescope. for the future enthusiast, AMazon.com will bring the best deal on a New purchase, what I ordered was $489.00 plus taxes and shipping fees, from Meade, from Amazon same exact telescope $269.00 out the door into shipping. those $8000.00 telescopes are going for as low as $2000.00 know this is what im talken about peace



posted on Oct, 18 2011 @ 11:46 AM
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Originally posted by lbndhr
reply to post by shasa
 


If only I had that much $$$$. for knwo I will go with the 10in a bit smaller but good enough to get me understanding the skies, and save for the real deal, big girl telescope. for the future enthusiast, AMazon.com will bring the best deal on a New purchase, what I ordered was $489.00 plus taxes and shipping fees, from Meade, from Amazon same exact telescope $269.00 out the door into shipping. those $8000.00 telescopes are going for as low as $2000.00 know this is what im talken about peace


but if you have a large light-bucket you cant throw it on your back and take it along when you go hiking.....



posted on Oct, 18 2011 @ 05:51 PM
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reply to post by Hellhound604
 


if or when I would consider a large scope it would stay at home, I live way out in the middle of nowhere no mountains pure open dark night skies. Its perfect for sky viewing.



posted on Nov, 10 2011 @ 12:15 PM
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I too am considering purchasing a telescope to explore my interest in astronomy. can anyone give me some useful recommendations about the one in this link.

seems decent and worth the price with all the extras

www.telescopes.com...



posted on Nov, 10 2011 @ 12:17 PM
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6 - 8 inch Dobsonian. If you have a bit more cash and bigger vehicle, 10inch.



posted on Nov, 10 2011 @ 12:29 PM
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I looked at the Meade 10" dobsonian, but i dont know what the difference is and which is useful or suited for the best viewing options.

I also like the motorized locating and tracking of the objects so i was looking for the best value for under $800 that gave me the best possible view.

I will list out the 4 i am interested in most and hopefully someone will come thru that can help and give me some good suggestions. If I was trying to stay away from the Dobsonian (only due to the non-electronics and my newness to the hobby) which would be the next best to go with that I would be pleased with what I am seeing?

Reflector:
www.telescopes.com...

Dobsonian:
www.telescopes.com...

Shmidt-Cassegrain:
www.telescopes.com...

Maksutov-Cassegrain:
www.telescopes.com...



posted on Nov, 10 2011 @ 12:33 PM
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I bought the Meade ETX-80AT-TC with Auto star. It is digital or manual. Has a 26mm and a 9.7mm eyepiece. This will take me some weeks to learn. So far with manual I've seen a Saturn. Its nice I can't wait tell I know it thoroughly
I bought it new through Amazon and got over $200.00 discount
edit on 10-11-2011 by lbndhr because: (no reason given)



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