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Did God and Noah do unto others in Noah’s day?

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posted on Oct, 19 2011 @ 12:18 PM
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reply to post by Greatest I am
 

I agree with your last but not with much of how you got there. If you take it as literal that is.
I was looking at Pthena's post and seeing how he was looking at it, as being myth, so I was trying to write my post as to fit with that premise, of big chunks of the tradition being myths. I was attempting to show how today's situation could have come about, given a second premise of my own, that there is a remaining reality on a certain level, behind the tradition, meaning what resulted in the Old Testament, but also the wider world. Not exactly the easiest task but I am studying all the time to get a better focused perspective.
edit on 19-10-2011 by jmdewey60 because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 19 2011 @ 04:36 PM
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reply to post by jmdewey60


I was looking at Pthena's post and seeing how he was looking at it, as being myth

I would recommend reading chapter 3 THE INVENTION OF THE EXILE of The Invention of the Jewish People by Shlomo Sand. In that chapter, it becomes clear how widespread Monotheism had already spread in the Greco-Roman world, mostly through upper class women. Alexandria alone had a larger Jewish population than Jerusalem, then there is the ever present Babylonian Jewish population which was a major center of Jewish learning.

Philo of Alexandria was a contemporary of Jesus. He's probably the most influential Jewish scholar to combine Stoic concept of Logos (word) as the creative force. John, the gospel writer may have gotten his phraseology from Philo's work.

In my own thinking, the Monotheism sweeping the Greco-Roman world, although associated with Judaism was not Judaism, but rather a generic/philosophical concept, and not a OT Biblical Yahweh worship.(compare the Greek philosophers, when they say Theos, they don't mean Zeus of classic mythology). If that makes any sense. Philo himself, took the Torah as perfect yet found it necessary to allegorize it. I'm just more comfortable with mythology than allegory.

Which brings up questions about Jesus. Did he object to Stoic type monotheism? Did he object to all proselytism? " Matt23:15 Woe to you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! For you travel around by sea and land to make one proselyte; and when he becomes one, you make him twice as much of a son of Gehenna as yourselves." Or did Jesus object only to the Pharisaic teaching associated with Babylonian Judaism?


that there is a remaining reality on a certain level, behind the tradition, meaning what resulted in the Old Testament, but also the wider world.

Imagine a Greek Stoic teacher, he would use classic mythological stories as illustrations of points. In the same way, a Stoic Jew would use classic Mosaic mythology to make points. In either case, neither one is taking the story as absolutely literally true.

There aren't many people who consider the Greek stories to be literally true, so not much danger there. On the other hand, there are plenty of people today who consider OT to be literally true. And people who also use it as some sort of magic oracle (as in consult the OT instead of Ouija Board)
edit on 19-10-2011 by pthena because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 19 2011 @ 05:36 PM
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reply to post by pthena
 

I would recommend reading chapter 3 THE INVENTION OF THE EXILE of The Invention of the Jewish People by Shlomo Sand.
I feel rather negligent (as I feel about a lot of things I am not getting accomplished) about not reading that far yet, being caught up in these New Testament "authenticity" questions of late. So I end up looking at things from a Pauline point of view, all-of-a-sudden.
I agree that there was a bigger influence on the general thing called Judaism coming from outside the Palestinian region. I doubt there was any sort of school there in Jerusalem like there was in Babylon and Alexandria.
I agree on the Theos thing and that was why Paul could use the word without reservation to mean a universal God, or as you say, a generalized concept of a god.
I'm still transitioning away from the strictly literal sense of the OT and that is helped by my recognizing Revelation as not being at all literal.
I think Jesus was just against anything which had as a main component, dehumanizing hatred for other people.
I ran into a guy making a comment on a video someone I know put up about Israeli atrocities against Palestinians, and he ends it with, "just you wait. . " I think there is something very wrong with that, where people think of God as just a tool for them to get vengeance on those who do not agree with their interpretation of apocalypse. My point being, even what passes for Christianity is not good if your sect you belong to promotes a God about to slaughter seven billion people, while smirking as they say it.

edit on 19-10-2011 by jmdewey60 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 19 2011 @ 06:07 PM
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reply to post by jmdewey60


I feel rather negligent (as I feel about a lot of things I am not getting accomplished) about not reading that far yet, being caught up in these New Testament "authenticity" questions of late. So I end up looking at things from a Pauline point of view, all-of-a-sudden

I hear you there. I've gotten rather scattered myself. I know a bit about Epicureanism from High School research of all things, but I'm way behind on Stoicism. So I downloaded Cicero's De natura deorum, which compares Epicurean with Stoic with Academic(from Plato's school). That was written 45 BCE. I haven't read much of that.

Meanwhile I'm reading up on 'separation of church and state' in US history, And now I have to go to a birthday party.



posted on Oct, 19 2011 @ 06:30 PM
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reply to post by pthena
 

So I downloaded Cicero's De natura deorum, which compares Epicurean with Stoic with Academic(from Plato's school). That was written 45 BCE. I haven't read much of that.
OK, cool.
I went on Wikipedia and looked that up. They have a link to the English translation. I like the flip-book way to read it.
Here is a link to start in on it (cued up to the beginning of the text) if anyone is interested:
Internet Archive
When you say, download, is that like in, Kindle? There is a newer translation which seems to be more technical and actually harder to read than the Archive version at:
Amazon
edi t on 19-10-2011 by jmdewey60 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 19 2011 @ 11:05 PM
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reply to post by jmdewey60


When you say, download, is that like in, Kindle?

This link here: De natura deorum-Open Library Then look at right side of page for formats:
PDF
Plain text
DAISY
ePub
DjVu streaming
MOBI or send to Kindle

I just right clicked on PDF and did save link as. It looks like the same scanned book as the read online, so page numbers should be the same.



posted on Oct, 25 2011 @ 08:01 AM
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Did God and Noah do unto others in Noah’s day?

A simple yes or no I have yet to see.
Can no one discern the answer?

Regards
DL



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