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Chinese Communist Party blasts US media for censorship of OWS protests

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posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 08:17 PM
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Chinese state run media is doing a better job of covering the protests than American media.

What a wacky, weird world we live in.


edit on 12-10-2011 by InformationAccount because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 08:21 PM
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China is seriously no better than the US both the US and China sensor their media when it opposes them



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 08:28 PM
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Well, it's really not all that surprising. A lot of the things that go on in more oppressive countries happen here in the States. Certainly it's a bit less overt, but a good bit does go on.



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 08:33 PM
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Talk about the pot calling the kettle black...

Internet censorship in the People's Republic of China is conducted under a wide variety of laws and administrative regulations. There are no specific laws or regulations which the censorship follows. In accordance with these laws, more than sixty Internet regulations have been made by the People's Republic of China (PRC) government, and censorship systems are vigorously implemented by provincial branches of state-owned ISPs, business companies, and organizations.[1][2] China's internet environment remains one of the world’s most restrictive, and China is ranked "Not Free" in Freedom House's internet survey

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The Chinese government has long tried to keep a tight rein on traditional and new media to prevent any challenges to its political authority. This has often entailed, watchdog groups say, strict media controls using monitoring systems, shutting down publications or websites, and jailing of dissident journalists and blogger/activists. China's censorship of its media again grabbed .lines in early 2011, when, following an online appeal for Chinese citizens to emulate the revolutions in the Middle East, the government clamped down on foreign media (AP), arrested dissidents, and mobilized thousands of policemen.

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Chinese TV: a history of bans and censorship
The Chinese State Administration of Film, Radio and Television (SARFT) has banned all police and spy dramas for the next three months, encouraging stations to instead focus on more wholesome programming



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 08:33 PM
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I keep hearing that the media are ignoring this SEIU mobile marketing campaign "OWS." I keep hearing it from CNN, MSNBC, NY Times, politico.com, etc. The Los Angeles Times had 3 different stories stream across my RSS feed today talking about how the media were ignoring OWS.



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 08:36 PM
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reply to post by InformationAccount
 


What censorship? Anyone who actually watches the News has been flooded with it. Only those who never watch the News are making such claims. Heck the Democrats are all over it, claiming it. MoveOn is taking it over. Van Jones is in on it. The Unions including SEIU are now up to their necks in it. All that from the MSM reporting I've watched.

The Chinese need to pony up the money for Cable TV in their Embassy



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 08:42 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 09:49 PM
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Originally posted by AnIntellectualRedneck

Well, it's really not all that surprising.

A lot of the things that go on in more oppressive countries happen here in the States. Certainly it's a bit less overt, but a good bit does go on.


The US doesn't assasinate disident citizens - oh wait nevermind

THe US doesn't jail disident citizens without a trial - oh wait nevermind
edit on 12-10-2011 by InformationAccount because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 05:48 AM
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Hahaha, what a double standard

Is time travel still banned in China?



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