Cash Transactions Banned on Used Goods in Louisiana!

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posted on Oct, 13 2011 @ 07:55 PM
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posted on Oct, 13 2011 @ 08:18 PM
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Originally posted by kdog1982
Isn't any different then them imposing sales taxes on internet purchases from out of state.
The states are struggling for money,starved by the Feds,so they are looking into anyway avenue to get more money.


Actually, i you will read the actual law, you'd find out it's all about the paper trail for stolen goods. California has a similar law with scrap metals, to have a paper trail to the thief, if the scrap sold turns out to be stolen.

I disagree with the law but understand its reasoning. What I believe the states should dew is allow secondhand buyers the option of paying by check, if they feel the need and the seller can't lawfully demand cash.


Ribbit



posted on Oct, 13 2011 @ 08:31 PM
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I by no way believe this should be done, yet..... I believe I have an understanding of why its being done.

The flea market and garage sale business out here is larger than most states.....

On the other hand we have a HUGE fishing industry, with all private fisherman whom sell fish, crabs, shrimp, crawfish, and oysters on sides of roads or out of their homes for cash. This business is a big darn deal around here. I have many friends making more than all of your Wall Street folks annually due to fishing.

Crawfish is like oil around here. Expect $80 a sack of 40lbs. at 50 sacks a day with no overhead.... you do the math. Ive seen chests of cash with $500k from a "decent" season out here.

Crawfish by some is considered "junk" or "second hand". When I lived in California for 10 years we had huge amounts of crawfish for free. No one would touch it, hence junk. Here in Cajun country its golden.... which leads us to the definitions of whats junk.

Cheers, Rufnusd



posted on Oct, 13 2011 @ 08:45 PM
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reply to post by RufNUsd
 


I don't look at seafood in anyway
being second hand or junk. I
don't think the fishing industry
applies in this instance unless
they are selling their boats, tackle,
nets, equipment, etc.



posted on Oct, 13 2011 @ 09:11 PM
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The crazy thing is that Americans actually "elect" these lawmakers !



posted on Oct, 13 2011 @ 11:18 PM
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I look at all these restrictions and regulations designed to tighten tptb's strangle hold on the people, and I think, "it is gonna be business as usual for me. I am not going outta my way to stay a slave and it is gonna cost several peoples life limb AND eye sight before they take me into custody for paying with cash."

Follow the money



posted on Oct, 13 2011 @ 11:26 PM
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Originally posted by DRAZIW
The crazy thing is that Americans actually "elect" these lawmakers !



"Americans" huh??

Remember that the next time the leadership in your country do something stupid........

Finger pointing is useless, leaders all over the world are backed by people that support them.........I wouldnt be so quick to start judging



posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 02:22 AM
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Originally posted by ManBehindTheMask

Finger pointing is useless, leaders all over the world are backed by people that support them.........I wouldnt be so quick to start judging


Actually, there are so many insanely crazy things going on in the world today, that I'm convinced we live in a virtual reality, like the movie MATRIX, and most of us are simply semi-conscious dudes walking about in this virtual space, barely aware that something is not quite right with it. The stories we hear in the news, just doesn't make any sense. The stock market has been stuck at the 11,000 level for two decades, and the Financial News announcers still report on that immovable stock market with the excited enthusiasm of a child discovering a new toy. And wait until you see that firetruck every day coming out to meet you on the road...it's gets weirder and weirder...But, who notices? All asleep. Only a few of us semi-aware here. Oh, well. I wouldn't worry too much about the leaders. They ain't leading anything. Something is leading them !



posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 03:05 AM
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Remember how they classify drug users as dealers in order to steal their monies and make plea deals.

In the same manner everyone who trades anything will be accused a dealer.



posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 02:07 PM
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Originally posted by liejunkie01
I can see it now.........

You walk into your cell...........Your celly asks you, "what you in for?"

You relply, " I sold my kids drum set and my lawn mower both in one month"..................................

WTF.......................

There is two states I will refuse to live in, maybe even visit..........

California and Louisiana


People need to move out.....If Illinois keeps it up I may think about it............What happens when there is no place left?



A goofy law that will never be enforced, notwithstanding, Louisiana is far more free than the vast majority of states in the Northeast or West Coast. Most of the Southern states are pretty free in general.



posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 02:17 PM
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Originally posted by RufNUsd
I by no way believe this should be done, yet..... I believe I have an understanding of why its being done.

The flea market and garage sale business out here is larger than most states.....

On the other hand we have a HUGE fishing industry, with all private fisherman whom sell fish, crabs, shrimp, crawfish, and oysters on sides of roads or out of their homes for cash. This business is a big darn deal around here. I have many friends making more than all of your Wall Street folks annually due to fishing.

Crawfish is like oil around here. Expect $80 a sack of 40lbs. at 50 sacks a day with no overhead.... you do the math. Ive seen chests of cash with $500k from a "decent" season out here.

Crawfish by some is considered "junk" or "second hand". When I lived in California for 10 years we had huge amounts of crawfish for free. No one would touch it, hence junk. Here in Cajun country its golden.... which leads us to the definitions of whats junk.

Cheers, Rufnusd


I think the fishermen are ok on this one. No Louisianian would classify crawfish as junk. And, thankfully, you can't sell "secondhand" or "used" seafood(that would be gross).
Where the fishermen get screwed is when a BP spill type incident occurs. They can only claim whatever portion of income they actually declare to the IRS (which is usually a tiny portion of their actual cash intake)



posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 03:52 PM
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Originally posted by Skadi_the_Evil_Elf
What an utter crock. Good luck trying to enforce this, since everyone, at one time or another, sells off unwanted items for cash, often to friends and neighbors. Not only are flea markets and yard sales effective ways to raise needed money, they are very eco-friendly, since instead of filling up a landfill or incinerator with perfectly good stuff, it is being reused and recycled. Thus, less purchasing foreign made stuff and utilizing natural resources.

And because such transactions are very informal and often haggled/bargained, paying by means other than cash or trade is completely impractical, especially for alot of people that don't have bank accounts. I can see this law getting shot down if they actually try to enforce it.


It's enforced every day in many states, including Texas. Every pawn shop does this...every day. That way, the police can see if anyone has pawned a (example) Rolex in the days following a robbery. Since cash was not used by the pawn shop, the police can follow the paper trail to the thief.

I KNOW! HORRIBLE! HOW DARE THEY INFRINGE ON CRIMINALS!!!



posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 03:56 PM
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Originally posted by imitator
What the hell is wrong with you Louisiana?

If this happens in my state, there will be hell to pay! This is not the kind of world I want to live in, people will go down fighting this system...


I bet if you look real hard, you'll find that this law, in some form, already exists in your state. And I don't even know what state you live in. I'm surprised Louisiana didn't already have it on the books!



posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 04:34 PM
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Originally posted by Wolf321

Originally posted by syrinx high priest
it prohibits a dealer from paying you in cash !!!!!


And this is more excusable??

Scenario: It's 6pm. I am in sudden need of cash tonight. I have no bank account or ATM to withdraw from. I have some old junk I can go sell, I go to a 'dealer' and they must write a check. I have to find someplace to cash a check in the evening in order to get my cash, and likely pay a fee as a result, if I am even able. Thanks big government.
edit on 13-10-2011 by Wolf321 because: (no reason given)


that's the best you could come up with ?

you actually proved my point....

I just hope you didn't steal that copper to make your cash. why the hurry ? are you a junkie ?

;-)
edit on 14-10-2011 by syrinx high priest because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 16 2011 @ 10:26 PM
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This was likely put in place so that they (they as in Louisianna's state gov) can have the information necessary to put forth a better looking GDP. Still, I find it to be far to invasive a law. Hopefully the population mostly ignores it and they are forced to abolish this BS.



posted on Oct, 24 2011 @ 04:21 AM
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Louisiana,

Only???



posted on Nov, 1 2011 @ 12:48 PM
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For instance: In Wisconsin a judge ruled that farmers had "No right to own a cow or drink its milk"


I belive femalepharoe is right, there are already quite a few supreme court decisions that address "commerce" and how citizens must interact with it. Though not specifically related to the new Louisiana law there is one on the book saying farmers cannot grow excess crops for personal use because it directly interferes with "commerce". I'm sure, long term, it won't be difficult for the fed, state and local governemnts to apply such thinking to second hand goods and identified underground economies. See below:


Wickard v. Filburn

Filburn argued that since the excess wheat he produced was intended solely for home consumption it could not be regulated through the interstate Commerce Clause. The Supreme Court rejected this argument, reasoning that if Filburn had not used home-grown wheat he would have had to buy wheat on the open market. This effect on interstate commerce, the Court reasoned, may not be substantial from the actions of Filburn alone but through the cumulative actions of thousands of other farmers just like Filburn its effect would certainly become substantial. Therefore Congress could regulate wholly intrastate, non-commercial activity if such activity, viewed in the aggregate, would have a substantial effect on interstate commerce, even if the individual effects are trivial.



Is there any precedent that would allow a law to be passed not allowing or legal tender in a transaction?


Yes, there are quite a few. If you haven't noticed local governments have been getting people arrested for trying to pay with pennies and at least one instance where someone was arrested for paying with $2 bills in Best Buy. But it doesn't really matter what the law says, a LEO can enforce it and arrrest any way they want these days. Sure you may win in court, but you can't get the money or your time back and in some cases a later background check will show you were arrested once. They have us by the tail and hope we have no financial means to fight back in court. In most cases that assumption is correct.


I'm sorry, but I have a COMPLETELY different take on this law, and yes, I believe it is VERY VAGUE for a reason


I agree with odd1out, they are trying to get tax revenue from second-hand sales. Government is testing out the means to make it possible. I don't think they have all thier bases covered yet, however, laws such as these are thier testing grounds. I fully believe the feds, state and local governments want to regulate the second-hand sales of goods in the short term and wholely eliminate the concept of selling second-hand goods in the long term.

Although it does not seem relevent, I believe many of the poor policy changes we have seen made by formerly succesful companies like Ebay and Netflix over the last few years are a direct reflection of internal, unseen pressure to eliminate large scale trade, renting and resale of goods. I imagine the boards of these comapnies have powerful folks that say "hey, we know you need to make a buck, but you are costing us money, can you figure out some sort of compromise, where we both win and the customers lose, no matter what they do!". I fully believe Ebay and Netflix's recent introduction of new fees, counter-intuitive rules and business plans had nothing to do with profit or success, but more to do with "greasing the palms" of the powerful, because lets face it ebay and netflix are "new kids on the block", a sort of "new money folk" that "didn't understand how thing really worked" until recently.




Virtually impossible to enforce. This is just like the international law that says US citizens should not buy certain things (drugs) in other countries


They don't need to do anything, but send you a letter saying you didn't pay taxes to the local and state governments. The burden is then on you to prove what you owe and what you don't. I have a few friends who do dog training and boarding for a living. Most of thier transactions are cash. Every year they get letter from cities that they don't do business in or live in asking for its share of taxes. This is going to be enforced through the mail by tax collectors, paper pushers, clerks and code enforcement, not police.
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