Cash Transactions Banned on Used Goods in Louisiana!

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posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 09:12 PM
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Holy over reactions, everyone.

This law is designed for pawn shops, so it is harder to buy and sell stolen items. I live in upstate NY, and worked in a pawn shop. Every item we bought that we paid over $10, we had to fill out a slip with some form of ID and a description of the goods and furnish it to the police. Several times, stolen items were recovered and thieves were arrested due to this. Its a system that works, allthough the lack of exceptions for common sense particulars (like flea markets, craigslist and ebay) is inexcusable.




posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 09:14 PM
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reply to post by aching_knuckles
 


Every terrible law we have was made with the best of intentions.



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 09:18 PM
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Originally posted by getreadyalready
reply to post by aching_knuckles
 


Every terrible law we have was made with the best of intentions.


So you think pawn shops should be able to pay cash with no paper trail for things like ipads and 52" LCD TVs?



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 09:18 PM
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reply to post by crazydaisy
 


I agree with you that this will probably spread to other states.
I am glad now that I canceled my vendor's license over a year
ago.I had to collect taxes from people who lived in my state.I
don't like this part about peoples' drivers' license either.



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 09:20 PM
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reply to post by aching_knuckles
 


I sold a diamond ring for $400 bucks in Florida and they took a copy of my driver's license, and I filled out a hundred forms.

There are already plenty of laws regulating how pawnshops operate. The ones that are doing shady stuff ignore the laws. More laws is never the answer. The shady ones will continue to be shady. The honest ones will continue to be honest, and the only thing accomplished is the erosion of our rights.



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 09:24 PM
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Just do what I do... and many others do...just ignore the stupid law. How are they gonna trace a yard sale purchase, or a flea market sale? Heck, most munincipalities are cutting budgets and can't enforce the really serious laws.... are they really gonna use resources and precious time tracking down last weeks yard sale traders?

Keep you're nose clean, mind your business, and don't tell nobody nothing... and always pay with cash.



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 09:30 PM
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Originally posted by getreadyalready
reply to post by aching_knuckles
 


I sold a diamond ring for $400 bucks in Florida and they took a copy of my driver's license, and I filled out a hundred forms.

There are already plenty of laws regulating how pawnshops operate. The ones that are doing shady stuff ignore the laws. More laws is never the answer. The shady ones will continue to be shady. The honest ones will continue to be honest, and the only thing accomplished is the erosion of our rights.


Yes in Florida. This story is about another state that has laws that are more lax than yours. Your point is invalid. If more laws were being added in Florida, I might agree with you. And unfortunately, we do need laws because people are stupid. Every law we have is a direct result of someone doing something stupid, and another dumb ass saying "There oughta be a law!". Unfortunately, humanity is too stupid for anarchy.



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 09:31 PM
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Originally posted by AlreadyGone
Just do what I do... and many others do...just ignore the stupid law. How are they gonna trace a yard sale purchase, or a flea market sale? Heck, most munincipalities are cutting budgets and can't enforce the really serious laws.... are they really gonna use resources and precious time tracking down last weeks yard sale traders?

Keep you're nose clean, mind your business, and don't tell nobody nothing... and always pay with cash.


exactly, this law wasnt meant to apply to flea markets and yard sales, and most likely will not result in people being questioned about selling second hand goods.



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 09:33 PM
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reply to post by aching_knuckles
 


True, but humanity is also responsible for enforcing the laws, and all too often they are interpreted by the letter of the law instead of the spirit. We have Judges and Juries for a reason, but the attorneys often argue that the juries don't have any choices in court. They convince the juries that they must strictly interpret the law like robots and remove any human element.

Except of course in litigation trials, where the attorneys completely argue on emotional basis and the jurors reward horrendous amounts of cash based on how they feel.


I can see a law specifically for Pawn Shops and Brokers, where they must document anybody that sells them an item worth more than say $100. I can also see a law where pawn shops are held criminally liable if they are found in possession of stolen goods. Those make sense, but they should be specific, and narrow, and written in plain language. This law doesn't seem to fit any of those 3 requirements.



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 09:46 PM
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reply to post by seachange
 


This will also inspire new cash only markets of original material.... Furniture, books, music, artwork, tools, pottery.... We really don't have to use THEIR goods, when we humans have plenty of our own that we can make....



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 09:52 PM
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This is insane. I used to work for a St. Vincent DePauls Thrift store. As far as I can see a thrift store is not included in the exceptions.

Old or poor people shop there using Cash, legal tender. Very few people used credit cards or checks.

Junk? What is junk?

My boss (most people) at St. Vincent's told me to get rid of an old broken down console type early 40's RCA radio we just got. She said it was junk because it was missing a few vacuum tubes. Being the floor tester/fix it guy and furniture salesman I asked her, "Are you kidding? This is a classic vintage valuable antique " She said I could leave it there for a week. I sold it for 75 bucks to a radio enthusiast in 3 days.

That was good for a thrift store where it was deemed junk.

This is a ploy to control and track the people. This must be stopped.



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 10:04 PM
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Originally posted by aching_knuckles
Holy over reactions, everyone.

This law is designed for pawn shops, so it is harder to buy and sell stolen items. I live in upstate NY, and worked in a pawn shop. Every item we bought that we paid over $10, we had to fill out a slip with some form of ID and a description of the goods and furnish it to the police. Several times, stolen items were recovered and thieves were arrested due to this. Its a system that works, allthough the lack of exceptions for common sense particulars (like flea markets, craigslist and ebay) is inexcusable.


I... honestly have to wonder about the intent of the law.

This could be one facet of it, true. However, the big thing right now is the 'underground' economy. It is a multi-billion dollar system that can involve a large number of transactions that avoid sales taxes. These economies are booming at the time - driven largely by tradesmen that have been displaced in the current economy. Many operate on cash - others simply operate on a bartering system.

Whether or not it is intended, this will end up being used to try and 'uproot' the 'underground' economy and expose it to taxation.



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 10:20 PM
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Sounds unenforceable to me....

So I guess all pawnshops in La. will have to shutdown? Not going to happen.



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 10:27 PM
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Originally posted by aching_knuckles

Originally posted by getreadyalready
reply to post by aching_knuckles
 


I sold a diamond ring for $400 bucks in Florida and they took a copy of my driver's license, and I filled out a hundred forms.

There are already plenty of laws regulating how pawnshops operate. The ones that are doing shady stuff ignore the laws. More laws is never the answer. The shady ones will continue to be shady. The honest ones will continue to be honest, and the only thing accomplished is the erosion of our rights.


Yes in Florida. This story is about another state that has laws that are more lax than yours. Your point is invalid. If more laws were being added in Florida, I might agree with you. And unfortunately, we do need laws because people are stupid. Every law we have is a direct result of someone doing something stupid, and another dumb ass saying "There oughta be a law!". Unfortunately, humanity is too stupid for anarchy.


There are most certainly laws regulating pawn shop purchases in all states...including Louisiana.

A record is made of the seller, the item, and the transaction.
This is how police have tracked stolen goods in pawn shops for over half a century.

You cannot pass a local law that disregards US currency or restrict the purchase and sale of legal goods.
This isnt going to fly any more than it would if they made their own local currency, and it's imposible to enforce.
It will end up with some lawsuits against the local LEO, and it will be dropped.
Another law passed and suppirted by wasteful idiots who want to make a name for themselves.
What a waste of time this is.



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 10:31 PM
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from the link



Motivating the introduction of this legislation was an increase in criminal activity, necessitating law enforcement to develop additional tools in tracking potential criminals. Thefts of copper and other precious metals have risen recently with higher commodity prices and mounting pressures from the economic downturn.


they are going after the scrappers. I've heard about new houses up here where all the copper tubing is stolen and then sold to a scrap yard

they want the scrap yard to ducument everything so there is a paper trail
edit on 12-10-2011 by syrinx high priest because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 10:33 PM
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Can you guys believe some moron really thought that in this economy, restricting commerce and business would be a good thing?

* Facepalm*



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 11:18 PM
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It's not a legally sound law and will fall at the first challenge, and if good sense prevails, even sooner. The reason this is a new tactic is because it can't be done.

Cash money is good for "all debts public and private," end of story.

Laws about requiring people to keep transaction records are a different matter entirely. It's fair game as part of legislative authority to regulate commerce and so they have been a preferred method for dealing with markets prone to use by thieves as a way to move stolen goods.

This 'durrr no cash' law is a stupid waste of time and money and will serve as a permanent mark of idiocy that will hang around the neck(s) of whoever is responsible for it like a scarlet letter i for idiot for the rest of their idiotic career(s).



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 11:21 PM
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Boy lemme tell you... they (lawmakers) sure have been to work ever since this OWS stuff started on the news channels.



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 11:46 PM
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posted on Oct, 13 2011 @ 12:30 AM
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***THIS NOTE IS LEGAL TENDER FOR ALL DEBTS PUBLIC AND PRIVATE***

Sorry, state of Louisiana but you lose on this one as soon as it is taken to court.
Your law does not supersede federal law. Not that they wouldn't like it just the same as Louisiana, but it hasn't been changed.. yet.





 
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