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Moon crater similarity's

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posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 05:47 PM
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Is it just me or am I seeing 3 main sizes of craters on the moon?


Link is to Astronomy Pic of the Day site....(pic up load not working)

Small medium and large , so to speak. I find this odd . Im sure there are more than 3 sizes of metors/space rocks. All seem to have the same debth too , but that could just be my perspective of an object 300,000 plus miles away.
Also after looking a little longer it seems that there is an adnormal amount of groups of three of the same size in close proximity. Am I looking to hard and need to get outside or am I really seeing some strange patterns of a moon to a life filled planet in just the "right" orbit ? Hmmm?




posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 05:58 PM
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Originally posted by Grayelf2009
Is it just me or am I seeing 3 main sizes of craters on the moon?


1. No, I'm seeing all sorts of sizes.
2. Thats a picture the planet Mercury, not the moon.



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 06:01 PM
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Do you realize you are looking at the planet Mercury here?


MESSENGER spacecraft has imaged nearly the entire surface of the innermost planet to generate a global monochrome map at 250 meters per pixel resolution and a 1 kilometer per pixel resolution color map.


At 250 meters and 1 km per pixel you aren't going to make out small craters. Have you heard of micrometeorites? They are minute impacts responsible for the soil on the moon much different than on earth called regolith. Its significant difference is its fine and irregularly sharp angles from continuous meteoric impact and bombardment by interstellar charged atomic particles over billions of years.

The idea that there are just 3 basic sizes of craters is just wrong, a toy store telescope will reveal many sizes starting from the huge dark spots on the moon a few hundred miles wide, to sizes like Meteor Crater Arizona, to soup dish sized to microscopic sized.
edit on 12-10-2011 by Illustronic because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 06:14 PM
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I'm sorry but first we have a 9-page thread on the moon looking higher, and now Mercury mistaken for the moon.

Our school system is literally failed these days, or people just don't get outside much these days.



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 06:40 PM
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Not once was the Moon mentioned on the website posted in the OP, yet the topic starter somehow came to the conclusion that it had to be a picture of the Moon. Seriously if you're going to make an attempt at starting a discussion about something, at least take the time to actually read the source material first. And I thought the "4 megaton impact" fiasco that was posted earlier was bad...
edit on 12-10-2011 by famalhut because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 09:04 PM
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Don't listen to them. It doesn't matter that it's Mercury. Mercury, Mars and the Moon all exhibit exactly the same type of cratering. There are often "chains" of craters, all in a row. The "scientists" will tell you these are meteors that broke apart just before impact. Somehow they ALWAYS land in perfect rows. Obviously they really have no explanation for it, yet can't admit it.

The important thing to notice is, see how they are ALL perfectly round? If these craters were caused by meteors, don't you think at least SOME of them would have landed on something less than a perfectly perpendicular angle? Causing somewhat OVAL shaped craters? Hmmm? The "scientists" will come up with some gobbledygook mathematical equations that "prove" that all meteors end up impacting at ninety degrees, but that is also obvious nonsense. Meteors hit the Earth at angles now and then, leaving NOT ROUND craters. In fact they ALWAYS hit on an angle less than ninety degrees.

Not here to tell you the whole story, but to get you started on the right path. Read this about the crater chains. Then take it from there. It will blow your mind.



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 10:56 PM
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Originally posted by CaptChaos
The important thing to notice is, see how they are ALL perfectly round? If these craters were caused by meteors, don't you think at least SOME of them would have landed on something less than a perfectly perpendicular angle? Causing somewhat OVAL shaped craters? Hmmm? The "scientists" will come up with some gobbledygook mathematical equations that "prove" that all meteors end up impacting at ninety degrees, but that is also obvious nonsense. Meteors hit the Earth at angles now and then, leaving NOT ROUND craters. In fact they ALWAYS hit on an angle less than ninety degrees.
You're disrespecting scientists, yet you've failed to do even the most elementary research on impacts, so it is actually you who should be disrespected, not the scientists. The scientists don't claim they all impact at 90 degrees.

Impact crater


Since craters are caused by explosions, they are nearly always circular – only very low-angle impacts cause significantly elliptical craters.[10]
The Barringer crater site states that below 30 degrees is a low enough impact angle for the crater to become elliptical.

By the way they aren't just making up ideas, they do impact tests by firing metal balls into sand or other materials at high velocity at different angles and study the crater formation, so this is based on empirical observation in lab experiments.


edit on 12-10-2011 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 11:02 PM
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Originally posted by Illustronic
Our school system is literally failed these days, or people just don't get outside much these days.
Probably some of both.

I look at the moon enough to recognize the pattern of the dark colored maria on the near side of the moon, and I noticed instantly that maria pattern was absent on that OP photo, so even without reading the caption I knew it wasn't the moon.

I was complaining that people dont read the articles the OPs link to before replying, but in this case it's just a short caption under a picture that wasn't read...



posted on Oct, 13 2011 @ 07:52 AM
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Also, a person with a casual or pedestrian interest in impact craters could also just Google it!



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