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Wilderness cooking guide: how to cook "ramps"

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posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 05:04 PM
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After reading some of the mock survival threads recently it looks like many members here consider themselves to be reasonably talented cooks. I'm not sure if they mean that they've actually cooked wild food often, food other than venison, or they're referring to their skills at cooking manufactured foods. Either way, there are many things to know about cooking food obtained from the wild, that doesn't apply to items you find in your local grocery store. In this thread, I'll go over how to turn ramps, or wild leeks, into not only an edible seasoning, but also a very good tasting one.

Once you've picked the ramps, you need to soak them in some kind of water. The purpose of this is to get rid of some of the "flavor" and tone it down into a more reasonable level. Straight from the ground, they're almost not tolerable. The best way to do this, is to find a reasonably fast flowing stream, with cold clean water, and wedge them between some rocks for the night. Leave them sit for 12 hours at least. If you only have a tub of water, that will work. Distilled water is best if you're using the tub method.

After they've been properly soaked, you need to clean them up, check them for parasites, and let them sit to dry off for a short time. After that you can cut the roots off the bulb, and begin mincing the entire plant into small pieces (leaves too). After you are done doing that, you can use them as is, or if you have a dehydrator, or access to a very dry area, you can dehydrate them and use them in much the same way that you would use minced onion in your kitchen. You can grind them into a fine powder, with a mortar and pestle, sort of like garlic powder. You can also freeze them, for later use if you do not want them dry.

You can use them as a dried seasoning anywhere you would desire onion or garlic. They can serve as both in a pinch. If you want to use them fresh, they can be put into a variety of dishes such as: omelets, fried potatoes, roast, soups, egg dishes, casseroles, rice dishes and potato dishes. You can also boil them and eat them like any other vegetable.

Another use for these garlic/onion type plants is a cure to the common cold. That's right, they're just like garlic to the common cold. If you're using them for this, it's best to eat them straight without any soaking, or if you're too timid for that, put them in some chicken noodle soup and they will cure what ales you.




These health problems would include atherosclerosis, type 2 diabetes, obesity, rheumatoid arthritis, and allergic airway inflammation. We would also expect to see leeks providing measurable amounts of protection against several different types of cancer, mostly likely including colorectal cancer. It's important to remember that even in the absence of research studies to confirm health benefits, leeks still belong to the same allium vegetable family as onions and garlic and contain many health-supportive substances that are similar to (or identical with) the substances in their fellow allium vegetables.


source

The people that posses the skills required to go from a plant in the ground, to a real dinner table worthy food, will be well off, should anything ever happen to the Earth.




posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 05:08 PM
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reply to post by Evolutionsend
 


Please excuse my ignorance but what exactly is a ramp? I suppose its some kind of plant but it sounds more like something you skate on



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 05:11 PM
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reply to post by Dionisius
 


If you don't know, it tells you in the source that I linked, as well as the relevant nutritional benefits. Here's a general description to what a ramp or a wild leek is.


en.wikipedia.org...

I agree, it does sound like a retarded name. If you say the words wild leek to a native of Appalachia, they'll likely look at you like this:

edit on 12-10-2011 by Evolutionsend because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 05:12 PM
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Originally posted by Dionisius
reply to post by Evolutionsend
 


Please excuse my ignorance but what exactly is a ramp? I suppose its some kind of plant but it sounds more like something you skate on


Stated in the opening paragraph.



In this thread, I'll go over how to turn ramps, or wild leeks, into not only an edible seasoning, but also a very good tasting one.


I never thought about wild seasonings OP, my B.O.B has a salt and pepper grinder. Wild leeks would add a nice touch of flavor to really gamey meats like wild rodents and such. Nice idea. S+F.



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 05:20 PM
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reply to post by LeTan
 


(hits head) I cant even read straight, time for bed im afraid.

reply to post by Evolutionsend
 


ahah I love Wild leeks, Ill have to remember that name for them just in case I end up in Appalachia. Cheers for the thread OP



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 09:30 PM
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Maybe now that I'm a bit older I could look at ramps differently but, having said that...the first time I smelled them being boiled/cooked...I became sick to my stomach!



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 09:42 PM
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reply to post by Evolutionsend
 


You have to be from West Virginia because noone who isn't would never know what ramps are.


I spent a lot of time in my younger days in Richwood.





oh jeez, now I'm homesick



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 09:48 PM
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I dare say that this individual is from down in my part of the country.... homefolks.... cooking ramps 'cause they are good for what ailes ya'.

The great thing about cooking ramps...they are like cooking any other wild or domestic green,,, soak'em... boil'em... cook'em down with some bacon grease or fat back or side meat or streak o' lean...fry up some corn bread... a pot of beans and maybe a sweet 'tater and diner is served.

Fact is... I had that tonight... only with BBQ backbone...

Wayyy Doggies...them thar is some good vittles.



posted on Oct, 13 2011 @ 07:21 AM
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reply to post by AlreadyGone
 


I forgot beans! Yes they're good in beans.

reply to post by berkeleygal
 


I might be from the county next door, maybe.


pssst, don't tell anyone!
edit on 13-10-2011 by Evolutionsend because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 13 2011 @ 09:23 AM
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I pick these earlier in the year than it is now. Actually still got some, frozen in blocks in the freezer, nice to add to pasta sauces etc.

Never heard about soaking them in water overnight to dull the flavour.... They smell alot but don't have such a strong taste. Though I like garlic, *alot*



posted on Oct, 13 2011 @ 10:06 AM
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reply to post by Okandetre
 


If you use the stream technique, they will taste more like a radish.



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