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Public Schools

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posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 12:41 PM
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I would like to address an email that I received from the school board, and for the life of me I can not figure out why I get so pissed on things like this.

Email:
Parents,
Please be advised that a copy of the Board attendance policy is available on our website. Generally, planned absences require prior approval of at least three days in order for the absence to be excused. Board policy specifically mentions the need for prior approval for college visits and religious events. Thank you for your cooperation with policy.


Now, I know, on the surface that this does not seem like such a thing to get overly upset about, but it gets under my skin and burns me up. How much more are the school systems going to keep weaving their grasp into the parents life and placing requirements upon them. I see no possible reasons as to why a school would need notice of an upcoming absence and this will be one policy I will refuse to abide by.

Maybe I should do what I am told and just get over it before I am put on a list.


edit on 12-10-2011 by Skewed because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 12:55 PM
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reply to post by Skewed
 


I think it's the whold tone of the notice. Not a big deal, but I felt the same way when I got the notice telling parents that we were not allowed to pick our children up from school by personal vehicle unless we paid for a $15.00 parking pass (when you don't parkin that freakin parking lot if you know what's good for you).



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 12:58 PM
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I'd tell them I'll give them 3 days notice as soon as they provide statistics on how many illegal aliens and anchor babies they are educating with my tax dollars.

My son was suspended in 9th grade when an illegal blind sided him in the hallway. My son never fought back, just blocked the remaining punches, and had a black belt in TKD at the time, as well as hapkido and yudo. If he would have fought back, the illegal would have been put out. Anyway, after that incident I decided to hit them in the pocketbook.

Each school/district has an "attendance day" where they beg parents to send their kids to school, even if they're sick. That day determines the funding they get from the state for that school year. That became a day off for my son for the last 3 years of high school. In Colorado, schools get between $6,500 and $7,500 (depending on who you talk to) per student. So, that little ordeal and not doing the RIGHT thing cost them around $20,000. It's a lesson they need to learn the hard way, I supposed. Vote with your wallet, and schedule the "attendance day" off. Oh, and give them 3 days notice too, and let them know "why" you're doing it. Maybe they'll get the point.



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 01:02 PM
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reply to post by navy_vet_stg3
 


I am not done yet, but I fired off a pretty indignant reply asking them if they would like for me to also inform them of my child's bathroom visits as well.

The solution to your issue would be resolved by closing the Federal Department of Education.



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 01:24 PM
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im having an issue with my son being graded on the texas pledge.. He got a 47 and they want me to sighn it..



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 01:28 PM
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reply to post by showintail
 


Not sure I understand the issue.

But I wonder how you signing it solves anything.



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 03:44 PM
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Two words:

Home school.

Or let the kiddies submit to govt brainwashing every day for twelve years. Hmmm.



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 03:50 PM
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reply to post by CaptChaos
 


Two more words:
Too late.

I am too far into the game to turn around now to undo all the things that need undoing.



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 06:31 PM
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reply to post by Skewed
 


I'm probably going to get completely railed on this, but so be it...

The tone was a little off. I wouldn't care for how they addressed the parents, either. Here's the part that prompted me to find my login information...


How much more are the school systems going to keep weaving their grasp into the parents life and placing requirements upon them. I see no possible reasons as to why a school would need notice of an upcoming absence and this will be one policy I will refuse to abide by.


I would think the urging behind this would be to have the students be proactive about missing work. And I think what bothers you is you are probably the responsible parent that would remind your child (maybe you're among the minority that wouldn't have to remind the child - the child would take responsibility) to acquire missing assignments. Basically, you were part of the peripheral audience that this wasn't necessarily meant for, but goes out to everyone, anyway. As far as "weaving their grasp into the parents' life" you would be amazed to know how many children I have to act as a parent for each and every day, because their parents are trying too hard to be their friends, or they simply can't be bothered with raising a child.



posted on Oct, 13 2011 @ 08:46 AM
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reply to post by kluskinoodle
 


No, I see your point.

However, I am no longer going to allow myself to grouped together under these blanket rules with the bad apples. If there is something I can do and/or say about it, I am. I am pretty good with civil disobedience.



posted on Oct, 13 2011 @ 11:46 AM
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reply to post by Skewed
 


“Life gets really simple once you cut out all the bull # they teach you in school.”
― George Carlin

I think you're doing it right.



posted on Oct, 13 2011 @ 02:22 PM
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reply to post by kluskinoodle
 


That's more evidence that school is more about conforming than actually learning. Teaching work ethic and responsibility to children is the job of a parent, a school educates them on subject matter, not matters of value.

I agree with the OP that public schools have been steadily trying to take over the role of parent for a while now. When I was in school, I was the straight A student that wouldn't comply with their conformist ideals.



posted on Oct, 13 2011 @ 02:36 PM
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its things like this, coupled with things like the new law that governor brown signed in california (giving minors authority to decide if they want to be vaccinated) that make me wonder how long it will be before we see a bunch of 12 year olds marching in the streets protesting for "minors rights"....



posted on Oct, 13 2011 @ 02:43 PM
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reply to post by UnrelentingLurker
 


They do not have to, slowly the kids are being separated from their parents by the system. All of it right under our noses and nobody even sees it happening.



posted on Oct, 13 2011 @ 09:05 PM
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Originally posted by Evolutionsend
reply to post by kluskinoodle
 


That's more evidence that school is more about conforming than actually learning. Teaching work ethic and responsibility to children is the job of a parent, a school educates them on subject matter, not matters of value.

I agree with the OP that public schools have been steadily trying to take over the role of parent for a while now. When I was in school, I was the straight A student that wouldn't comply with their conformist ideals.


I'm not going to disagree with you regarding your first point. There is some element of conformity along the lines of sit in your seat and listen to the teacher - it kind of has to be that way. We have NCLB to thank for that.

WARNING! Here's where I go off-topic, but it does have to do with responsibility as you stated above...

I have a set of standards that I have to teach, and if my kids don't pass and show improvement over last year's group, then I'm held accountable, which I should be. We teach what we teach and try to make it as interesting and fun as possible. But, when the parents don't do their part to teach responsibility and work ethic, do I just let the child slide or do I do the best I can to try to help him or her? I'm just saying, a lot more falls onto the shoulders of the educators because the parents work multiple jobs and can't be there for the kids, the parents are in jail, or as I stated previously, the parents are trying to be the child's friend or they simply don't care/can't be bothered. Obviously, not all children in a public school fall into these situations, but it happens a lot. When the child isn't being pushed at home and starts to fail a class, do I recognize this and just continue to let him or her fail, or do I step in and do what I need to in order to help? I guess the short of it is, do I punish a child for a crappy home situation or do I step in and "be a parent" so to speak?

If you read this post, you'll see what we have to deal with every day. Not even exaggerating...Every. Single. Day. It's a different world out there, folks, from when we were in school. Things need to change.



posted on Oct, 13 2011 @ 11:19 PM
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reply to post by kluskinoodle
 


You see the problem, good and I am glad you understand what your position and responsibilities are.

Where the problem is, the teachers that will not take charge of their classroom, or exploiting tenure. When they encounter an issue that they either cannot or will not deal with, then they diagnose the child with ADD. I have seen first hand how this works. In my case, the teacher, for what ever reason refused to take charge and a little discipline would have fixed the problem.

I also think that technology has driven a wedge between the parents and the teachers. There are times that I feel that, at the least the administrators avoid parents, maybe not so much the teachers.

Then we have the teachers that actually care. To me it seems that the very same system that a lot of parents despise, also is the teachers nemesis as well. There are times I have seen where the teacher was attempting to do the right thing and would get denied, usually due to PC, or fear of safety is a good one as well. I do not know what a good answer really is for those teachers, but the only one I can think of is those must start fighting the same system as the parents are. Going against the administrators wishes, when appropriate. I know that would not be a popular option, I just see no other. If the teachers want to see change, then the parents and teachers must band together to get our schools to quit conforming to the DOE and get it shut down.

But at the end of the day, I think, what we may actually be seeing from some of the parents is not that they do not care. It is that they are fed up, frustrated and feel helpless. Because trying to talk to some of the administration is like talking to a brick wall. If something has a chance of being controversial there is a very high chance it will be ignored. Every day is status quo, day in day out, how can anyone learn in an environment like that. As a result, the parents just do not get involved with the school, because it never does any good.

edit on 13-10-2011 by Skewed because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 13 2011 @ 11:34 PM
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reply to post by kluskinoodle
 


It doesn't sound like the OP's child needs that. I had them trying to do the same when I was in school. My parents were working folks, and I turned out fine. Seriously, all of you need to have children as a prerequisite to your job, because some teachers without children really have no idea when to butt out!

Stop sucking the last bit of fun times in life, all out. We can't speed, that was deemed wrong in the 70s. We can't smoke, that was deemed wrong in the 70s. We can't rock, that was deemed wrong in the 80s. We can't watch a movie with bad guys getting shot and blown up, that was deemed wrong in the 90s. Wrestlers are all steroid addicts and not actually real, this happened in 00s. We can't do anything anymore! Out of the womb, and straight to the ball and chain with you!






posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 05:39 PM
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reply to post by Evolutionsend
 


Right, that's what I said to the OP - that they didn't need it, but it was most likely a blanket communication to all parents. At no point did I assert that the OP was one of these parents...

All of us need to have children as a prerequisite? That's like saying all oncologists should have cancer...

While I agree that some teachers without children don't know when to butt out, I know plenty that have their own kids that also don't know when to butt out. But we are TRAINED to look for any little sign of anything because if we notice something and don't report it, we are liable...

I am assuming you're one of the good parents that I'm again, not talking about, and so your children know work ethic and responsibility. However, if I didn't provide that instruction or direction should the child need it, then I'd be failing that child. It usually becomes clear when a child doesn't want your help and at that point, most people would just stop offering.

I think the public education system gets such a bad rap because the only things the public typically hears about are the bad things...There are good campuses with good teachers and administrators who let the kids have fun and bend the rules (on occasion). Teachers do think that some restrictions can be bothersome but they're there for a reason. It's not like everyone on every campus wants to be in everybody's business and be the fun police...I don't know a heck of a lot of kids that consider school to be fun. I didn't think it was that fun, but I was intrinsically motivated to do well, and that was what was expected of me, so I met the expectation. I had my fun when I got home - I wasn't at school to play. Lots of kids now don't know the difference.

I don't know, maybe the people on this forum aren't my audience. I just want to be heard, dang it!



posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 05:44 PM
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reply to post by Skewed
 


I couldn't agree with you more! I'm in the trenches every day and this is what I live...

I agree with your last paragraph as well, and I will maintain that there is parental apathy, but by and large it is that the parents feel helpless. I feel like this won't change because what is frustrating those parents goes beyond the building in which their child receives an education.



posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 06:47 PM
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reply to post by kluskinoodle
 


I'm not a parent. You could say that I raised my younger siblings, but that's not true because parents were at home every night at 7. That's what happens when people work for a living. I'm an angsty 26 year old that still remembers how often one of the teachers were grasping for straws and making assumptions about small things.

As far as why you get a bad rap? Same reasons cops do. Lack of pay to attract anyone good in most cases. I can remember 4 teachers that effected me profoundly, and they were good enough to carry through the other 20 BAD ones. The worst teachers imo, are the teachers that have never left school. They went through public school, they went through college, they went to their job, at school. How can someone know how to teach, if they've never done anything other than learn?
edit on 14-10-2011 by Evolutionsend because: (no reason given)



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