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Food Prices: Just a Heads Up!

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posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 12:09 PM
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reply to post by sheepslayer247
 


Very timely advice.

Thank you




posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 12:26 PM
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Originally posted by sheepslayer247
reply to post by navy_vet_stg3
 


Nowadays, those skills are considered relics of a "barbaric" age.

Then I guess you can call me "barbaric" I may not be as good as my grandparents were, It has been a few years, but I still can set bank poles, jug lines, and trotlines. I can still hunt with gun or bow. With the masses of people in the country, Are they going to rise up, or roll over? Many I think will just roll over and give up..



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 12:30 PM
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reply to post by sheepslayer247
 


Thank you this is good solid advice everyone can use. as we are fast approaching a long cold winter here in the States it is just another reminder to keep a good stock of the basics on hand rather than making a daily or weekly run to town for our supplies.

Great OP!



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 12:37 PM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 


Right I was also thinking about this while reading this thread, I have a wonderful neighbor who has cattle and he told me due to the fact Hay prices and grain have become so high he was going to sell and retire.

Sad, he is a good man and a wonderful Farmer.

Once it gets out of the hands of individual families as my neighbor it then becomes a greater catastrophe for the cattle as factory farming will take over the industry and that is sick, unhealthy, mentally and emotionally hard on the cattle as well as a health hazard to humans and animals.

Plus the renderings are going to be put into everything you buy from puddings to bread.



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 12:39 PM
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reply to post by oldshooter1979
 


I am not calling these skills barbaric, but many people see these skill sets as from a time long ago....when we walked on our knuckles!


Didn't mean to offend, and use the same skills in my adventures. Glad to see there are other who carry on the skills.



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 12:43 PM
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I truly believe winter will be a tough one for many reasons. As stated earlier we were going to go out for more beef. And we did. We have been canning all season long putting up tomatoes, beets, pickles, etc. and even have enough wood to last the entire winter into late spring. We are as ready as we can be; Your heads up gave us pause though. To do just a little more than we had previously done.
Thanks again
DH



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 12:44 PM
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reply to post by Welshy77
 


I agree i am a super market butcher and food costs have rocketed all around the store its happening everywhere, i used to laugh at my grampa and granny for saying "Oh this is terrible back in my day things didnt cost as much"


Well turns out i am beginning to say those exact things to my neices and nephews... lol



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 12:51 PM
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Originally posted by sheepslayer247
reply to post by oldshooter1979
 


I am not calling these skills barbaric, but many people see these skill sets as from a time long ago....when we walked on our knuckles!


Didn't mean to offend, and use the same skills in my adventures. Glad to see there are other who carry on the skills.


You did not offend, but speaking the truth. I wish I kept up my skills better, but when one works 5-7 days a week with very little time off things get pushed aside.



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 12:51 PM
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reply to post by DavidsHope
 

The good thing is that if the prices don't jusmp as high as planned, then you still have a good stock to rely on. You are not out anything at all.

Glad to hear you have ben canning. Wish more people were doing the same.



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 01:21 PM
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Just a quick note....

If you stock up on grains and flours, freeze them for a week, then take them back out for 45 days, then refreeze again. The first freezing kills any varmints in the flour, then the second freeze will get their offspring before they emerge. Then your stock is good as gold, it will keep very long time in the freezer and about 6-10 months in your pantry.

Also, like our petrol prices, we see them go up with very little decrease when times get better. So I really don't see them coming back down significantly, after the fact. Be ready and stay safe with your storage.



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 01:22 PM
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reply to post by sheepslayer247
 


Yeah, I have been watching items that I buy at Fry's...and in the past year or two, things have jumped 50%.

For instance, I used to be able to get a packet of biscuit mix for .99 - and now, the same pack costs $1.39. I am routinely spending $100+ a week at the store, and have little to show for it. and, it is only going to get worse.



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 01:23 PM
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reply to post by oldshooter1979
 


I feel ya. I work about the same, and I wish I had more time to go fishing...but we all know how that works.

I will be honing my skills more as time allows. Lord knows I could use some practice.



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 01:28 PM
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reply to post by sheepslayer247
 


So, when you say "hyper-inflated food prices", do you mean something like $20 bread (up from ~$3 now), or more in the range of $5-6 bread?



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 01:45 PM
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reply to post by mossme89
 


I believe I said "super-inflated" but in the grand scheme it means the same thing.

I believe that unless we can get the weather to cooperate with the crop harvests before the first freeze, and Mexico, California and Mexico has cooperative weather. prices will cotinue their upward trend.

Grain and feed prices push up animal products and oils.

So we could easily see a $5 loaf of bread, and IMO would have just as much impact as any higher price. It wont take much to break the average buyer. If bread is that high.....imagine what everything else is at.



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 02:06 PM
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The reports I have seen show 2011 and 2012 with modest 10% increases.

2013 through 2016 will not see hyperinflation But a considerable 100% cumulative inflation due to the national debt. So the $20 bag of grain now becomes $40 then $80 then $160 over those years.

Im not an economist. I know whatever you stock up on now though will return better money than any investment you could make, so it makes sense to me as long as you will use what your stocking.

I remember in 1976 you could get wonder bread on sale for 8 loaves for $1.


I will give 200 to 1 odds we will never see that again within the next 3 years. (or likely in our lifetime really.)
edit on 12-10-2011 by Shadowalker because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 02:18 PM
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reply to post by SunflowerStar
 



Thats a commonly told waste of time. If they will be in storage for less than 3 years you could open them and get a hatch from eggs and thats pretty certain. But the fact is no living insect or egg can survive longer than 7 years in a nitrogen only environ.

So...if your using mylars and you dont get the tight brick end product.....some of those eggs are viable beyond 7 years. If your product goes brick hard because you purged extra air before the seal its fine unless you open before 5-7 years then you need to watch it close. Regardless you only see bugs after the damage is done.

So the bottom line. If your using oxy absorbers and you think you will get into the product before that long term time for use. Dont risk it. Freeze twice. If your sure you can break 7 years before opening skip the freeze.

I hope that makes sense. There is nothing worse than bugs in flour and other things. Makes the cooked food stink even if you decide they are protein.

Do the safe thing for what you believe.
edit on 12-10-2011 by Shadowalker because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 03:06 PM
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reply to post by Shadowalker
 


I'm probably not as old as you, but I remember bread being almost that cheap.

Its funny because I had to go to the local store and I checked out the bread aisle....we are not too far from $5 loaves of bread. At the same time as food increases the wages remain flat or lower. I can just imagine the poverty levels increasing drastically over the next 2 years.



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 03:26 PM
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reply to post by sheepslayer247
 


Have not fished this year. I did replace line on my reels, and tossed some of my tackle that was shot. I hope to start again this coming spring ( if we make it ) up around the lake and river. If it goes to heck in a hand basket maybe sooner..



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 03:56 PM
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reply to post by Shadowalker
 

Your post does make since when you are doing the Mylar sealed with oxygen absorbers. In a properly sealed bag, purging as much air out of it while sealing, the absorbers do an excellent job in producing a vacuum pack. One should also store those sealed bags in food grade (recycle 2) bucket. And pack those bags in usable quantities, so as not to corrupt the bigger lot of your stores.

I see now when I made that post, I was actually envisioning folks who were just getting started to accumulate the basics in their pantry. And shoulda, woulda, coulda in preserving their rations. Rather than the experienced survivalist who would already be aware of many of the safeguards in long term storage. My bad, but thanks for opening my horizon a bit more. And you gave me a bright new idea for a thread! Thanks. SS



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 04:21 PM
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Here is a link from the National Inflation Association. It contains some hard facts on food prices, how they are related to past inflationary trends, and what to expect in the future. Not trying to be an alarmist but this is kind of scary stuff to read.

NIA



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