Biggest virus in the world found at bottom of sea...

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posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 05:02 PM
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You've got to be kidding me. Why would they want to bring this to the surface of the earth???



A virus found in the sea off Chile is the biggest in the world, harbouring more than 1000 genes, surprised scientists report. The genome of Megavirus chilensis is 6.5 per cent bigger than the DNA code of the previous virus record-holder, Mimivirus, isolated in 2003. Viruses differ from bacteria in that they are usually far smaller and cannot reproduce on their own, needing to penetrate a host cell in which to replicate. Advertisement: Story continues below But M. chilensis is such a giant that it surpasses many bacteria in size and is genetically the most complex DNA virus ever described. It was taken from seawater sample close to the shore of Las Cruces, Chile. Its host organism is unknown. Read more: www.brisbanetimes.com.au...


They claim that "M. chilensis "doesn't seem to be harmful for humans"

Famous last words ...




posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 05:04 PM
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another EOW science? Perhaps? Always mindful

This also reminds me of John carptner The thing
edit on 11-10-2011 by Jordan River because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 05:06 PM
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That's pretty cool.

I can't wait to see what they can pull out of Lake Ellsworth.
www.bbc.co.uk...

All dangers aside that sort of complexity is pretty exciting.



posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 05:11 PM
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It would be awesome if they could find the host. It would be interesting to see how the virus interacts with it's cellular mechanisms.



posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 05:11 PM
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Well the new re-make of the " The Thing" is coming out, too bad they didn't film it in Chile. Amen to , famous last words..


Something should be left alone, but thanks to Curiosity we all know where that can leads to.



posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 05:12 PM
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I'm always amused at the panicky old lady reaction from most people when anyone says words like 'virus', or 'radiation'.

Most viruses are completely harmless to humans.



posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 05:16 PM
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DNA viruses include pox viruses and herpes viruses, but M. chilensis "doesn't seem to be harmful for humans", said Jean-Michel Claverie, of France's National Centre for Scientific Research.


Now why I don't I believe that? haha
This could turn out to be something quite serious indeed...It could be something quite worthy to keep an eye on.



posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 05:16 PM
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reply to post by nineix
 


Sure they would have said this when they first encountered the AIDS virus ...



posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 05:17 PM
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Originally posted by nineix

I'm always amused at the panicky old lady reaction from most people when anyone says words like 'virus', or 'radiation'.

Most viruses are completely harmless to humans.


Lack of knowledge. Maybe if they had given attention during lesson, they wouldn't make such stupid comments...
edit on 11-10-2011 by Jepic because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 05:22 PM
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reply to post by ExCommando
 


As I understand it, the AIDS virus was first encountered in humans, already effecting them, and later back tracked to a primate species.

Big difference between finding something already occupying a host species, especially if it's already effecting a human population, and discovering something in the ocean.



posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 05:34 PM
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reply to post by nineix
 


I don't see your point. Virus' are potentially huge killers, and this is the "biggest virus on earth", surely there is some justification with ref: to concern of possible effects on humans?



posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 05:36 PM
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en.wikipedia.org...



Implications of discovery

Two Megavirus specific features are of fundamental importance. First, even if its new record-sized genome only represent a small 6% increment compared to the second largest Mamavirus genome, it indicates that we have not yet reached the limit of viral genome sizes, and that even more complex viruses may remain to be discovered,[citation needed] most likely in aquatic environment, the viral diversity of which has been barely scratched by recent metagenomic studies.[citation needed]

Second, the presence of three additional aminoacyltRNA synthetases in the Megavirus genome, with a total of seven, definitely rules out their independent acquisition by lateral transfer from a host.[citation needed] In addition, the phylogenic analysis of their amino acid sequences does not cluster them with any known protozoan clade, but rather connect them deeply to eukaryotic domain.[citation needed]

The conclusion then becomes inescapable that the genome of these giant viruses originated from an ancestral cellular genome (thus endowed of a translation apparatus, with all 20 aminoacyl tRNA synthetases) from which today’s Megaviridae derived by a number of lineage specific genome reduction events, a scenario akin to the one followed by all parasitic organisms. As indicated by the deep rooting of their phylogeny, the Megaviridae lineage might be very old, eventually predating the emergence of modern eukaryotes, or be contemporary and/or linked to the emergence of the nucleus. 5 Alternatively, it could be derived from an extinct cellular domain (the controversial 4th domain of the Tree of Life[6]), many genes of which would have managed to persist in today’s giant viral genomes.[citation needed]




posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 05:45 PM
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reply to post by ExCommando
 


Imagine what maybe at the bottom of Lake Vostok.

Virus's are pretty amazing lifeforms, there adaptability is incredible, yet they are still archaic in their mode of expression.

1000 genes is quite a lot of mutation adaption when i think of what i could do with my computer with 1000 lines of code.

Cosmic...



posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 05:50 PM
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Originally posted by ExCommando
reply to post by nineix
 


I don't see your point. Virus' are potentially huge killers, and this is the "biggest virus on earth", surely there is some justification with ref: to concern of possible effects on humans?


I'll grant that there should always be concern when dealing with anything previously unknown.
It's not like this is some episode of the squidbillies and the scientists are wondering what this new virus tastes like with bbq sauce.
A scientific line of inquiry will be pursued using established protocols for handling and investigation of such things.

Further, it's a really large sized virus, and that's actually a really good thing when it comes infection control, if this virus where found to have any effect on people at all. A large virus is easily found, and sorted out in the immune system.
It's not like dragons, sharks, asteroids, or tornadoes where anyone needs to go running around in a panic with their hands in the air all 'omfg it's really huge, it's gigantic!!!'
A really big virus makes a really big target that's really easily sorted.

Nothing to be concerned about, even if this thing ate people's faces off.





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