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Massive prehistoric monument under the water of the Stenness Loch?

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posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 05:11 PM
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reply to post by druid1
 


Check this out.
www.eutimes.net...
Despite the refusal of the Secretary General of the Egyptian Supreme Council of Antiquities, Zahi Hawass, to release any DNA results which might indicate the racial ancestry of Pharaoh Tutankhamen, the leaked results reveal that King Tut’s DNA is a 99.6 percent match with Western European Y chromosomes.





posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 05:16 PM
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Nearing the end of the last Ice Age, the British Isles were considerably larger. The English Channel was little more than a creek.

Elsewhere in the world there were vast lakes of liquid water held in place by ice that had not melted. Occasionally one of these bodies of water would break through the ice and spill into the ocean. Oceans could rise several feet in a very short time.

Ancient people in low lying areas would have to move to higher ground because of the rise in water levels of the oceans, often leaving behind their belongings if the surge was too fast.



posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 05:24 PM
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Originally posted by Violater1
The mysteries like the The Baghdad Battery.


I think that's pretty well be debunked as a scroll storage vase that sprung a leak and dissolved the scroll inside. The remaining metal parts were just what was left over after the scroll was gone -- the central iron core it was wound around, and the flexible copper metal cover. That they happen to be electrolytic is just chance.



posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 05:47 PM
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Looks like a underwater landslide rubble pile. I seriously doubt this anomaly is a civilization. The water is too deep.



posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 07:24 PM
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reply to post by ThorsBrother
 


Maes howe was impressive as was the day trek to the Old man of hoy. I even played the opening music to the Wickerman as I flew in ! Went to Shetland after, another place steeped in history



posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 10:11 PM
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reply to post by navy_vet_stg3
 


I mean, it's not like we found the foundations of a skyscraper or the engines of a space ship.

This is like finding your childhood teddy bear that's been lost for 20 years. It's just cool, but not something lost that you had to regain.



posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 11:38 PM
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reply to post by Gorman91
 


Very true, but the more we discover, the more we may understand how the giant monoliths were made, how corn images wound up in British churches long before the "new world" was "discovered", and other interesting things. It's always good to discover new things, even if they are old things. History is always fascinating.



posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 11:45 PM
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reply to post by navy_vet_stg3
 


never heard of the corn stuff.

If you want a mystery, I've got a few. Ask yourself why the translation of Noah's Ark's wood is more or less plywood.

Plywood was invented in the 1900s, fyi.

idk. When I look at ancient stuff like this, and then see higher levels of craft in South America, or Turkey, that are older, I sort of just get uninterested in these large stones just laying in the middle of no where.



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 12:02 AM
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awesome thread Op, entire settlements in the Mediterranean were lost under the sea ages ago, Britain is magical by its very nature, things back then were very different than what they turned up to be.
Many secrets were lost, all we can do is speculate and wonder at the marvels the ancients left behind.

How could they move the rocks? how could they stack them with the precision and care that they did?
If according to history only hairy cavemen were running around at the time.

I believe there is much we aren't told, and much we cant even begin to comprehend regarding our ancient ancestors and its ulterior motivations for taking so much effort in doing whatever they did.

Check this out, its a webpage where you can take a look at sea levels and land exposure by adjusting the height of the sea level, pretty useful for expanding this sort of things!

Effect of sea levels in erope


cheers!



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 05:00 AM
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reply to post by Gorman91
 


I thought that some translators now think that the term "Gopher wood" was laminated wood not a particular species, which actually would have made any structure much stronger.

One of the so called finds was a boat like structure made of laminated wood near the border of Iran if I remember correctly.

Anyhow back on topic...there's apparently loads of archaeological investigations going on all over Orkney at the moment. Last time I was there we came across a major dig near the Gloop.

City under the Sea on Monday shown on BBC1, was all about a sunken settlement off the Greek coast. It was amazing how the computer animation brought it all to life. 3,000 years old the harbour settlement would have not looked much different to a modern village with running toilets, administrative buildings etc.


edit on 12-10-2011 by JB1234 because: Added for context



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 06:14 AM
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Another one?
We've got them coming out of our backsides!

www.megalith.ukf.net...


edit on 12-10-2011 by Suspiria because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 12:56 PM
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reply to post by JB1234
 


yep, but its translation can infer some sort of honeycombing structure or compression. Lamented wood basically is plywood. But such practices were unheard of thousands of years ago.

Greece is a whole other story. Did you know the Minoans were only a 300 or so years behind our modern times? Rome herself was about 200 years behind our modern times. Minoan society was pretty awesome.


Take a gander.

Look familiar?

Might as well be your local house or shopping mall.






edit on 12-10-2011 by Gorman91 because: (no reason given)

edit on 12-10-2011 by Gorman91 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 03:19 PM
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reply to post by Gorman91
 


Howdy Gorman91!

What do you base this on?




Did you know the Minoans were only a 300 or so years behind our modern times? Rome herself was about 200 years behind our modern times


For Rome that would place Rome in 1811; hmmm depending on what you consider 'about' even if you push it back to 1761 another 50 years the world then had, gunpowder, mathematics were greatly evolved as were the physical and social sciences. navigation and geography were well beyond the Romans too. Political and social issues were more advanced. Plus porcelain which the Chinese had but not the Romans had been adopted by the West by then.

May I suggest that you present a matrix showing what the Romans had vs the time period you think they were equal to? It might make the comparison more viable.



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 03:47 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


Yea a common question.

Basically it's an issue of scale, industry, and knowledge.

Let's tale Rome for example. Their medical knowledge was only surpassed around WW1 (minus injections...I think. That's another thought all together though). Their infrastructure was only surpassed in nations like America and England circa 1850. Their industry was only surpassed 1811-dy as you sorta said. And their artistic skills were surpassed somewhere around da-vinci. Now it's probable that Rome had some kind of knowledge of fire arms and gun powder, as they had trade with China, and the use of "grenades" is pretty ancient. But with that knowledge, they did not actually use it. Just like how Roman Egypt knew about the steam engine, but not how to use it in industry.

en.wikipedia.org...

These average down to around 200 years, maybe 250 as you put it. This averages down to just about the 1800s, really. Which, btw, was around the same time it took the Renaissance people to fully learn, digest, and re engineer classical works.

I mean, ancient China too. They had fire arms, cannons, infrastructure, but not the same level of art, industry, etc etc. So they, too, could be somewhere around 200-300 years behind.



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 04:03 PM
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Originally posted by Suspiria
Another one?
We've got them coming out of our backsides!

www.megalith.ukf.net...


Now there are some people with a lot of time on their hands. But I guess if the climate stabilizes and you don't immediately have to worry all the time about finding food, what else are you going to do?



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 06:11 PM
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reply to post by Gorman91
 





Let's tale Rome for example. Their medical knowledge was only surpassed around WW1 (minus injections...I think.



Galen (a Roman author on Medicine) was deemed the authority until 15th century when the Europeans began to surge ahead helped by Arab authors, with the discovery of the circulation of blood, invention of microscopes in the mid-15th century. So I’d put medicine back to that period and of course the start of the development of the the scientific principles.




That's another thought all together though). Their infrastructure was only surpassed in nations like America and England circa 1850.


I’d say the Chinese were there in 1500 years before if you mean city organization, roads, fortifications and canals however we may be defining 'infrastructure' differently



Now it's probable that Rome had some kind of knowledge of fire arms and gun powder, as they had trade with China, and the use of "grenades" is pretty ancient.


Probably not as the Chinese didn’t have it until centuries after Rome had fallen

So you might be safer in saying the start 15th century with some acknowledgement of superior developments by the Chinese, Indians and Arabs in selected areas.


Interesting subject
edit on 12/10/11 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 07:43 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


Well thing is, the Arabians were simply working off what they got from the Greeks and the Romans. Of course there is no proof that the Romans had microscopes and the lot, but that doesn't explain why, in the first century BC, Marcus Terentius Varro is quoted as saying:



"When building a house or farm especial care should be taken to place it at the foot of a wooded hill where it is exposed to health-giving winds. Care should be taken where there are swamps in the neighbourhood, because certain tiny creatures which cannot be seen by the eyes breed there. These float through the air and enter the body by the mouth and nose and cause serious disease." Marcus Varro.



One must wonder how they knew this without a microscope. I'm not saying they had one, but clearly the knowledge was gained some how.





I’d say the Chinese were there in 1500 years before if you mean city organization, roads, fortifications and canals however we may be defining 'infrastructure' differently


I define infrastructure as the easy by which a citizen may travel, live, and do business within their own nation. The Chinese clearly had practical knowledge. One does not simply build a wall that can be seen from space without engineering knowledge. The Dougong was quite a genius little creation However, China did not have 200 year old domes that have survived earthquake, the fall of civilization, and many other woes.




Probably not as the Chinese didn’t have it until centuries after Rome had fallen



I'm not so sure. There's a great deal of ancient stories involving entities that must have been fueled by some sort of explosive. However this is speculation. For without written proof, how can we know.

Again, in many cases inventions have existed for eons before they were "invented", people simply did not know that they could be used that way. One way to know this for sure is when something that's pretty complex just happens to pop into history. Chances are it was around for a while, just no body thought to use it that way.



posted on Oct, 13 2011 @ 11:51 AM
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reply to post by Gorman91
 


Interesting topic but we are going off topic for this thread. I would suggest starting up a thread on this subject and we can continue from there!



posted on Oct, 15 2011 @ 03:20 PM
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reply to post by Gorman91
 


It's just amazing how technologically advance ancient civilisations were. Those houses you pictured could be off "Grand Designs!"

Getting back OT my Orkney friends tell me there are more finds like this on the way hopefully.



posted on Oct, 15 2011 @ 05:34 PM
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Originally posted by Gorman91
reply to post by JB1234
 


yep, but its translation can infer some sort of honeycombing structure or compression. Lamented wood basically is plywood. But such practices were unheard of thousands of years ago.

Greece is a whole other story. Did you know the Minoans were only a 300 or so years behind our modern times? Rome herself was about 200 years behind our modern times. Minoan society was pretty awesome.


Take a gander.

Look familiar?

Might as well be your local house or shopping mall.






edit on 12-10-2011 by Gorman91 because: (no reason given)

edit on 12-10-2011 by Gorman91 because: (no reason given)


Thank you for providing such a great find and contribution.

S4U



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