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North is the New South.

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posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 10:24 PM
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So, I'm having a beer with my S.O. yesterday. We were seated at an outdoor table, and the weather was unbelievable. I live in VT, so a balmy evening around this time of year is an enjoyable fluke (Well, for the time being, anyway. Could get pretty common w/i the next decade or so.)

And then, flukier still, I observe three flocks of geese flying north. One, much smaller flock heading SE also passed by. It got me thinking about pole shifts.

O.K., so migratory birds navigate by means of specialized cells in their beaks that are magnetically sensitive. According to this article, they might have the capability to "see" the earth's magnetic lines of force.

So, I'm thinking, what if a pole shift wouldn't result in anything terribly catastrophic (well, in its initial stages, anyway), but may instead manifest as this kind of thing: birds getting mixed up due to the lines they use to navigate being all wonky because they are in the process of shifting.

What do you think, guys?
edit on 10-10-2011 by mistermonculous because: floop.




posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 10:43 PM
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I have no good knowledge on this topic but sure it makes sense. A pole shift from what I've read is supposed to cause natural events such as flooding and earthquakes. I think we can all say that the number of earthquakes have seemed to spike over the last couple of years. Flooding has also seen it's spike on the East Coast most recently and I believe up in North (or South) Dakota. I think it's also been studied that no "rapid-shift pole shifts" have either ever occurred or has not occurred within the pst 100-200 million years. So yes this makes perfect sense to me



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 10:48 PM
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reply to post by mistermonculous
 


Well, magnetic pole shifts are exactly as they are called, "magnetic pole shifts." Much of the b.s. out there (resulting in millions of dollars in book sales) has people believing the earth will shift drastically on its axis, continentst will thrust across oceans, Montana will be the new Equador, etc. The biggest danger of a pole shift is the brief "shut-down" in Earth's magnetic field before it starts back up opposite of what it was before. A big CME with the field shut down could probably be a bit messy, for example.

In the meantime, between pole shifts (which have happened regularly throughout Earth's history), the magnetic pole does migrate. It has been migrating faster in recent years than in less recent years, but nothing drastic, and nothing that hadn't happened in the past.

Now as you say regarding bird migrations, etc., I believe things like that could definitely be affected. I have seen geese flying north as fall/winter approach for 30+ years, but always assumed they just don't take a directly south route, and maybe are just making a food/water/rest stop along their way. But again, I definitely think anything dependent on earth's magnetic field for navigation could show signs of the accelerating migration of the magnetic pole, and definitely some serious confusion when it shuts down and restarts opposite.



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 11:03 PM
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reply to post by dogstar23
 


Well, I have one question if there is no crustal pole shift type major movement of land in a fast way. How is it that animals like the wooly mamoth that was found in Siberia frozen in the ice still had butter cups in its mouth from eating in a summer field?
Wolly Mamoth

edit on 10/10/11 by spirit_horse because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 12:44 AM
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reply to post by spirit_horse
 


I don't know about that, and hadn't heard about it, though I wouldn't be suprised its happened at some point (maybe multiple times) but the magnetic pole shifts are not the same thing, and would likely be totally independent. If not, we would probably connect changes in polarity and geolocations across the same time periods, as we have highly accurate dating for magnetic pole reversals.



posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 03:40 AM
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OP, I think you should look into the theories/myths surrounding the hollow earth. Migrating birds that normally would fly south this time of year have been observed flying north before. It's a phenomena that has been observed before.



posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 03:58 AM
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reply to post by mistermonculous
 


Geese tend to fly north over my house as well. The reason is simple - the best place for waterfowl to eat and rest is north of me. it gets dark, some of them decide to make a U-turn and settle in for the night. or they're coming in from the west or east and see what amounts to a Canada Goose version of a truck stop.

They're birds, not robots.



posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 08:09 AM
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Originally posted by TheWalkingFox
reply to post by mistermonculous
 


Geese tend to fly north over my house as well. The reason is simple - the best place for waterfowl to eat and rest is north of me. it gets dark, some of them decide to make a U-turn and settle in for the night. or they're coming in from the west or east and see what amounts to a Canada Goose version of a truck stop.

They're birds, not robots.


Thanks for the above; it was evening, so this is very plausible.

I did consider the idea at the time, but all sources of water within a 20-some mile radius are in the SW, more or less the opposite direction. But, yeah, this still seems to be the most likely explanation.



posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 08:11 AM
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Originally posted by Regenstorm
OP, I think you should look into the theories/myths surrounding the hollow earth. Migrating birds that normally would fly south this time of year have been observed flying north before. It's a phenomena that has been observed before.


Interesting. Will do.

I wouldn't be surprised if Chaz Fort hadn't compiled a few of these incidents in his records.



posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 08:11 AM
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Originally posted by spirit_horse
reply to post by dogstar23
 


Well, I have one question if there is no crustal pole shift type major movement of land in a fast way. How is it that animals like the wooly mamoth that was found in Siberia frozen in the ice still had butter cups in its mouth from eating in a summer field?
Wolly Mamoth

edit on 10/10/11 by spirit_horse because: (no reason given)


Well, that is plenty weird.

Thanks for the link!



posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 08:14 AM
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It was 86 here yesterday in New York. I've never been apple picking up in CT and remember being so warm.

Living on LI, geese have flown north plenty of times. And I'm closer to the ocean than the sound. I've never thought it odd, just maybe that they were taking a detour.




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