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Nuclear detonations over the years

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posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 02:49 PM
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A nice video showing all the nuclear detonations from the detonation at Trinity (1945) till today and the number is astounding.

www.liveleak.com...

The tune is also catchy
.




posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 02:52 PM
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Am I the only person that wouldn't mind a nice 1080p vid of a nuclear blast? perhaps Imax? to bad the logistics of setting something like that up are a bit much...

Come on middle east
j/k



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 03:00 PM
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reply to post by benrl
 


After 2053 detonations in 55 years ... i bet they could do that to do a nice clip
it wouldn't be such a big pain in the butt.



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 08:41 PM
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See, Fukushima is nothing to worry about. Hell, they've been releasing more radiation than that 400 times a year! This is just a drop in the bucket.



posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 12:40 AM
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Originally posted by CaptChaos
See, Fukushima is nothing to worry about. Hell, they've been releasing more radiation than that 400 times a year! This is just a drop in the bucket.
That's partly true, but it's different.

Decades after the bomb was dropped on Hiroshima, there were (and are) people living in Hiroshima at ground zero, so Hiroshima wasn't rendered uninhabitable by the bomb.

Decades after Chernobyl, nobody is living at ground zero, and Fukushima will likely end up the same way decades from now. So you could say Fukushima isn't a big deal for Europeans to worry about, but it's something Japan has to worry about.

They wouldn't allow the nuclear bomb powered rocket to proceed after the nuclear test ban treaty. That would have been a sight, to see project Orion dropping hundreds of atomic bombs as it launched!



posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 03:21 AM
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reply to post by Arbitrageur
 


Actually the radioactive isotopes released from Fukushima have a half time of 20 000+ years (the time it takes for an isotope to decay so its emisions become half of the initial value) whereas in a nuclear bomb the half time of the uranium isotopes is very short.

en.wikipedia.org...
en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 07:12 AM
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Originally posted by AlexIR
Actually the radioactive isotopes released from Fukushima have a half time of 20 000+ years (the time it takes for an isotope to decay so its emisions become half of the initial value) whereas in a nuclear bomb the half time of the uranium isotopes is very short.
I think you mean "half-life", not half-time.

Half-time is what they call the break halfway through a football game!


But yes, the half lives are different, which explains why Chernobyl is a "dead zone" and Hiroshima isn't.



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