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Mini Bug Out Bags?

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posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 09:21 AM
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You guys may have have heard the George Carllin routine "A Place for My Stuff" - where as he travels he takes an increasingly smaller version of his "stuff" with him until he is down to the stuff he "really" needs.

Throughout the years I've had the good fortune to hunt with a few former special forces guys. Each of these guys eventually trusted me enough to tell me where they had a small BOB or two hidden in the woods "just in case..".

Typically we'd hunt for a week or so at a time so while they might have a BOB at home, they might also have one in their hunting camper, and a few small ones stashed in the woods.

I think its probably a good idea. The question is - what is in the mini-bug-out-bag? The same as in the "regular one" or is it as George Carlin said - just the stuff you "really" need?




posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 09:35 AM
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reply to post by Frogs
 
Never without mine. I have an 11'' canvas, zipper closure tool bag from Harbor Freight that travels with me in my vehicle when I make short trips from home. Long trips require the bigger bag. Knives, diamond hone, firemaking equipment(three types), any medications that I would be currently taking, flashlight& spare batteries, paracord, IOW... the most important things that fit.

Oh yeah, spare ammo and the thing that fires it.



edit on 10-10-2011 by butcherguy because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 09:40 AM
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Whenever we travel far from home we take the RV. It is always loaded with everything we need if we are caught out. As we do not intend to bug out, the house has a comprehensive inventory.



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 09:50 AM
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Around the top of my pack is a dual water bottle hiking waist pack. It contains the following duplicating the same items in my pack. the two stainless bottles for boiling and heating water.

water filter straw (5000 gal type)
scripto naptha lighter and fluid
fire steel and tinder
hunting knife cold steel bushman (doubles as a full size spear)
small first aid kit
compass
bandana
3 day coast guard ration
TP
trot line gear for 4 of the 30 hook lines
snare material for around 30 snares. 40 if i make smaller ones.
frog trident
2 space blankets (1 to reflect fire on the inside of lean to)
small .22 handgun w/2 mags and 20 rds in them
2 garbage bags
20 foot duct tape
zip ties
4 gallon ziplocks for collecting food
small aluminum cook pan
thin steel square for cook grate

If i drop and stash my larger pack thats enough to go for a while. I probably would add more to it but thats all that zips shut, fits in the pockets or hangs from the belt.

edit on 10-10-2011 by Shadowalker because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 09:51 AM
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The Cache concept is pretty solid if you frequent a particular area often. As for a mini BOB, I just carry the essentials in my EDC/get home bag.

Blow out Kit and general first aid items and OTC medicine
3 lighting options w/spare batteries
leatherman wave
bandana
sharpie
Gorilla tape
Howler whistle
zip ties
small length of paracord
emergency bivy/space blanket
poncho
mini hacksaw
widgy bar
two lock pick rakes and a tension tool
mini bic lighter
and some misc. items



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 09:59 AM
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reply to post by Frogs
 


If you expect to survive, there is no such thing as a mini bug out bag.

period.

Unless you mean for 2 days, because you need to survive.

a bug out bag is 72 hours at most... othewise you want an inch bag... a well equipped one.

Im Not Coming Home... Or you're just camping.



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 10:17 AM
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reply to post by Frogs
 


I used to work for NM Moiuntain Rescue... so mine is not so much as a BOB as it is grab and go rescue field kit... I did have support but JIC it did have enough in there to aquire anything else I needed...
Start with the pouch...Maxpedition Jumbo E.D.C.

Army Model firesteel in left hand pen socket
Diamond knife sharpener (Gerber) in right hand sharpener
Cheap zip pulls replaced with 550 cord glowing pulls
Silva Micra compass mounted to strap on front pocket
Swedish firesteel (army)
Splitter ring
Recoil plastic covered wire to attach firesteel to belt
Gerber flat and round diamond sharpener
2" ziplocks of firlighter pieces in front pocket
2" ziplocks of vaseline and cotton wool in front pocket
Silva ropeburner
SAK including LED torch, pen, tweezers etc.
Firesteel striker (in case belt knife lost)
LED Silva torch
ACME whistle
Mixed Bandaises (plasters)
Puritabs (10)
10 magnifying ground
Waterproof paper
Pencil . Blister kit.
Pocket chainsaw
40' Kite string
Mark 2 snares (6)
old tobacco tin containing fishing kit.
Strong analgesics (8)
Unlubricated condoms (2) useful to carry water or other things
Sterile threaded suture
Bottle of iodine
edit on 10-10-2011 by GrandpaDave because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 10:18 AM
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This is my idea situation because i live in the boonies and i have more of a bug out box than a bag, so pretty much i'd keep a small bag just to make sure i can back it back home.

my mini bob -
canned catfood containers to make a stove.
A few lighters
box of matches
rubbing alcohol
first aid
gas mask filter
knives
snack bars
bottle of water



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 10:19 AM
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If you expect to survive, there is no such thing as a mini bug out bag.
reply to post by Ha`la`tha
 


One of Rickenbacker's most famous near-death experiences occurred in October 1942.[23] He was sent on a tour of the Pacific Theater of Operations to review both living conditions and military operations, and also to deliver personally a secret message to General Douglas MacArthur from the President. After visiting several air and sea bases in Hawaii, Rickenbacker was a passenger in the B-17D Flying Fortress numbered 40-3089, which strayed hundreds of miles off course while on its way to a refueling stop on Canton Island in the Central Pacific Ocean. The B-17 was forced to ditch in a remote and little-traveled part of the Central Pacific. The failure in navigation has been ascribed to an out-of-adjustment celestial navigation instrument, a bubble octant, that gave a systematic bias to all of its readings. That octant reportedly had suffered a severe shock in a pre-takeoff mishap. This unnecessary ditching spurred on the development of improved navigational instruments and also better survival gear for the aircrewmen. The B-17's pilot-in-command, Captain William T. Cherry, Jr., was forced to ditch his B-17 in the Pacific Ocean, rather close to Japanese-held islands, also. However, the Americans were never spotted by Japanese patrol planes, and they were to drift on the ocean for thousands of miles. For 24 days, Rickenbacker, the Army captain Hans C. Adamson, his friend and business partner, and the rest of the crewmen drifted in life rafts at sea. Rickenbacker was still suffering somewhat from his earlier airplane crash, and Capt. Adamson sustained serious injuries during the ditching. The other crewmen in the B-17 were hurt to varying degrees. The crewmen's food supply ran out after three days. Then, on the eighth day, a seagull landed on Rickenbacker's head. He warily and cautiously captured it, and then the survivors meticulously divided it into equal parts and used part of it for fishing bait.[24] They lived on sporadic rain water that fell and similar food "miracles". Rickenbacker assumed leadership, encouraging and browbeating the others to keep their spirits up. One crewman, Alexander Kaczmarczyk of the USAAF, died and was buried at sea. The U.S. Army Air Forces and the U.S. Navy's patrol planes planned to abandon the search for the lost B-17 crewmen after just over two weeks, but Rickenbacker's wife persuaded them to extend it another week. The services agreed to do so. Once again, the newspapers and radio broadcasts reported that Rickenbacker was dead. A U.S. Navy patrol OS2U-3 Kingfisher float-plane piloted by Lieutenant William F. Eadie, USN spotted and rescued the survivors on November 13, off the coast of Nukufetau in Tuvalu. All were suffering from exposure, sunburn, dehydration, and near-starvation. Eadie was awarded the Navy's Air Medal. Rickenbacker completed his assignment and delivered his message to General MacArthur, which has never been made public. Rickenbacker had thought that he had been lost for 21 days, and wrote a book about this experience titled Seven Came Through, published by Doubleday, Doran. It was not until later that he recalculated the number of days, and he corrected himself in his autobiography in 1967.


There are a lot of these stories out there. Just google 'Stories of Survival".

The biggest tool isn't in any bag, it is your BRAIN.



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 10:21 AM
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I've got a small bag stashed in my desk at work, a get home bag in my car, as well as small kit of essentials that I keep in my purse. At home we are set up to sustain ourselves for an extended period of time. We have several bags stashed around places we go often.
I've also prepared a few mini kits for loved ones to keep in their cars. I am never out of arms reach of my gear.

Maybe I'm a little paranoid.



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 10:24 AM
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I have a few ammo boxes in various places various distances from home. Closest one about 10 miles farthest about 120 miles. All headed to my shelter and I can get there in a little over a week of walking at night



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 10:37 AM
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A couple things I see missing from other lists that I carry in every bag I have regardless of size:
Water filter
Extra socks
Rain poncho/shelter half
Leatherman tool



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 10:43 AM
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Originally posted by Asktheanimals
A couple things I see missing from other lists that I carry in every bag I have regardless of size:
Water filter
Extra socks
Rain poncho/shelter half
Leatherman tool


Slaps my forehead....

Gotta teach ya fellers everything dont I...
you dont carry a water filter ... you make one
if you have charcoal from a camp fire it helps to add a layer of that too


edit on 10-10-2011 by GrandpaDave because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 02:21 PM
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Originally posted by jibeho
The Cache concept is pretty solid if you frequent a particular area often. As for a mini BOB, I just carry the essentials in my EDC/get home bag.

Blow out Kit and general first aid items and OTC medicine
3 lighting options w/spare batteries
leatherman wave
bandana
sharpie
Gorilla tape
Howler whistle
zip ties
small length of paracord
emergency bivy/space blanket
poncho
mini hacksaw
widgy bar
two lock pick rakes and a tension tool
mini bic lighter
and some misc. items


Big up the Gorilla Tape! that stuffs amazing, Gorilla Super Glue can be extremely useful as well. You can get it in tiny tubes for BOB's as well.

Need to get myslef a Poncho.

oooooo I forgot about the Wrecking Bar, now thats one useful tool for any situation. I recommend the Gransfors Bruks range, They are the only Guaranteed Indestructible Wrecking Bar out there that is actually Indestructible.

The Bic Lighters are amazing, I dropped one in a lake about 5 years ago whilst smoking with friends, at a usual smoking spot for us so I went there allot, about a year and a half later we went for our usual smoke to find the lake had been drained so we went to our usual spot dangling our legs over the edge, I dropped the 'cigarette' in the dried up lake and luckily it had completely dried up, so picked up the 'cigarette' with a massive pheewwww when I saw a colourful piece of plastic half submerged in the mud, I yanked it out to find that it was my old bic lighter I had dropped a year or so ago, I tried to light it but there was mud in the gas outlet so cleaned it out and tried again, the little bic sparked up first time and carried on sparking up for the first time for 6 months thereafter and I was a massive smoker back then(not condoning it in the least, stupid thing to do and the only thing I regret in my life). Now I know, I know, Pictures or it didnt happen so i guess it never happened


Nice thread OP S&F



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 02:45 PM
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reply to post by GrandpaDave
 


god damn it! every post you make has something really useful in it. If there was an award for 'most helpful contributor', you my friend would win it!

I just wish I had friends like you around here that I could kick back with and learn from at the same time.

good work


e2a: Forgot to say, when TSHTF or I ever get into a sticky situation, it's you I will thanking when I pull out my bug out bag and whittle a light saber!
edit on 10-10-2011 by doubledutch because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 03:15 PM
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reply to post by Dionisius
 


I carry the Gorilla tape wrapped around a closed loop of paracord. I keep one on the key chain and one in the bag

www.itstactical.com...-11054

You can never have enough. I like the black color too. It's discreet on the keychain.



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 03:37 PM
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reply to post by jibeho
 


ahhhh I havent seen that before. Nice tip man, gunna make me one of these for my SAK.

Cheers



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 06:05 PM
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Originally posted by jibeho
reply to post by Dionisius
 


I carry the Gorilla tape wrapped around a closed loop of paracord. I keep one on the key chain and one in the bag

www.itstactical.com...-11054

You can never have enough. I like the black color too. It's discreet on the keychain.


Keychain is a good idea. I wrap mine around an old plastic card like an expired health card after sanding my info off then a cap wrap on each end to keep dirt and fuzz off the edges of the rolled tape.



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