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Meteorite strikes French couples house.

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posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 06:48 AM
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Unfortunately there is no link in English at the moment so here is the French link and a translated version.

Even though the translated version gets the name wrong it's interesting to not the lady's name was Mme Comette
The meteorite fell in August and was only discovered when a repair man had come to fix a leak in the roof tiles caused by the fallen meteor. It appears to be a chondrite, the larger piece was 88 grams but she discovered over 100 grams worth.

All I can say is cool, wish it would happen to me.

www.francesoir.fr...
www.francesoir.fr... une-meteorite-chez-mme-comette-145743.html%26hl%3Den%26biw%3D1280%26bih%3D855%26site%3Dwebhp%26prmd%3Dimvns" target="_blank" class="postlink">Google translate

English link.
www.thelocal.fr...

www.bimsociety.org...



edit: Sorry about the messy link.
edit on 10-10-2011 by pazcat because: (no reason given)

edit on 10-10-2011 by pazcat because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 06:51 AM
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reply to post by pazcat
 


that thing looks awesome
i want one



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 06:58 AM
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They are actually really lucky because the general rule of thumb here is they get to sell it now.

Even if the Govt confiscates it the scientists will make a fuss about it, they usually do. And typically it is returned to the finders.

These things can sell for tens of thousands $$$.

This is like winning the lotto essentially.



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 07:00 AM
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Originally posted by muzzleflash
They are actually really lucky because the general rule of thumb here is they get to sell it now.

Even if the Govt confiscates it the scientists will make a fuss about it, they usually do. And typically it is returned to the finders.

These things can sell for tens of thousands $$$.

This is like winning the lotto essentially.

i would never ever sell it
its priceless if you ask me



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 07:09 AM
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Originally posted by ShortMemory

Originally posted by muzzleflash
They are actually really lucky because the general rule of thumb here is they get to sell it now.

Even if the Govt confiscates it the scientists will make a fuss about it, they usually do. And typically it is returned to the finders.

These things can sell for tens of thousands $$$.

This is like winning the lotto essentially.

i would never ever sell it
its priceless if you ask me


I'd keep half and sell half...
Compromise ;D



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 07:12 AM
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I would like that set in a ring please.

I'm not likely to get diamonds, so this will do instead.



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 07:20 AM
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reply to post by muzzleflash
 


I would be thinking a chondrite of around 88 grams would be lucky to get $500, but with it's story and location that could push the price up with collectors. A dealer would probably pay less and then slice it up.
Personally I'd keep it as I have a few already.

Not sure what the French law is but general rule of thumb is it's the landowners property, so if they had a landlord he could claim it. I'd tell him to get stuffed though.



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 07:21 AM
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Hu, anything that does not happen in Paris, according to the French Press is not French. Typical, that they had to mention that it was less than 50 miles from Paris. Does that really matter? Does it matter that the property was rented?

Still, lucky near miss for the family. Could have ended in tradegy.
edit on 10/10/2011 by TheLoneArcher because: Grammar



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 07:39 AM
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reply to post by TheLoneArcher
 



Basically it's called journalism, it would be an even smaller story without all that 'fluff'.
It does matter that it was the first meteorite discovery that close to Paris, so yes in some circles that is important.



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 07:41 AM
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reply to post by pazcat
 


I hear you on that. If you watch French TV, most of the news is about Paris and the surrounding area.



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 07:50 AM
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At lunch time the news mainly about cows and holidays, but yes they are faily Pariscentric.



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 07:52 AM
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reply to post by pazcat
 

Cows?? Wow, sounds like they actually sent someone to Normandy. Goodness, that is a long way from Paris. LOL



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 08:05 AM
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Although I agree with all of your comments about Paris contre le Hexagone, the important point to this thread is that when the house was struck by an actual meteorite, no-one really noticed. It did not lead to a huge explosion like the recent blast in Argentina, nor cause a massive wildfire. I'm starring, flagging and noting this thread for future reference.



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 08:13 AM
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reply to post by DJW001
 


Most objects that fall to earth do not cause major devestation. However, in this case, a small object struck the house. It could have landed in the garden and hit someone. It is very rare that an object such as this falls in an inhabited area.

No, that fact was not lost on us at all.



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 08:16 AM
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reply to post by DJW001
 


Sorry about drifting off topic a tad there.

But you're right, and what is also interesting to note according to the English link I just added to the OP is....


"This is super rare," he said. "There have been only 50 meteorite falls in France over the last four centuries."

If that's the case my valuation needs to inflate, significantly.
Now that is not many at all, but I'd guarantee you there have been thousands more that have gone un-noticed in those 400 years.

edit on 10-10-2011 by pazcat because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 08:20 AM
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Originally posted by TheLoneArcher
reply to post by DJW001
 


Most objects that fall to earth do not cause major devestation. However, in this case, a small object struck the house. It could have landed in the garden and hit someone. It is very rare that an object such as this falls in an inhabited area.

No, that fact was not lost on us at all.


You are aware that for the majority of people such a meteorite just looks like a stone. While a meteorite impact might be rare..i don't know how many are happening without anyone noticing.



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 08:26 AM
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reply to post by flexy123
 


Nor do I. However, consider how many objects fall to earth in one year and consider how much of the planet is not inhabited by humans. This means that the majority of space debris that fall to earth has more chance of landing in an uninhabited area. Of course, unless you know what you are looking at, they only way to identify it for what it is, is to witness the impact.



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 11:03 AM
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reply to post by TheLoneArcher
 


I agree, I would say the fact that only 50 meteor falls in 400 years bares a good testimant to the fact that most of the time it will happen without anyone noticing at all.
edit on 10-10-2011 by pazcat because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 11:09 AM
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reply to post by pazcat
 


Looks like a possible meteorite to me.

texasmeteoritelab.com...

Here are a few tests to determine a meteorite from a terrestrial rock or stone.



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 11:14 AM
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reply to post by pazcat
 


It's funny with all the planets and comets and asteroid warnings. I'm prone to thinking large bolide as big as there house or something. Then I see this dracnoid that fell from the sky. But hey, doesn't everybody want one of those.

SnF for a timely story.
edit on 10-10-2011 by randyvs because: (no reason given)



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