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10.9.2011 at approx 1:30 AM - Please check this out & tell me if I'm losing it...

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posted on Oct, 9 2011 @ 02:39 AM
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Originally posted by nineix
Thank you for posting the video.
Unfortunately, since the video is of a faint blinking dot that moves around the screen with no reference points to discern whether the movement is the light, or shaky hand cam movement, the video says more against itself than it does for whatever you might think it is.

I'm not sure how far above the horizon this little blinking light was, but, it's a common illusion with commercial jet moving away from a viewer low in the sky to appear stationary, especially while they are climbing in altitude as they get further away. The flashing running lights would thus appear to be stationary in the sky, and if the jet is far away, you may not even hear it.
The blinking light shown on the video seems to match the tempo of flashing running lights on passenger jets.

That of course is only speculation.

Edit: Also, if you have an iPhone, or an Android, I understand there's an app that allows you to point your phone at objects in the sky, and it'll show you what that object is; satellite, planet, star, whatever. I don't know what the app is called snce I don't have one of those fancy phones.
edit on 9-10-2011 by nineix because: (no reason given)

Point well made and next time I'll move the camera down on the tri-pod to show the line of horizon and smooth movement. Constructive skepticism is always a healthy thing and I accept your comments in good nature but unless there has been a jet liner outside my window every night for almost two weeks in the same exact spot (with three others sitting stationary in a straight vertical line right next to it - same formation every night), I don't think that's what this is.

BTW, I don't have one of those phones either and nothing is worse at taking videos than my Blackberry. I'm hoping that one of these days I'll be able to get some type of telescope with a camera.

EDIT: Just to be clear, Blackberry wasn't used to take this video as it never would have come out. Was a regular camera sitting on a tri-pod in movie mode.

Thanks for the reply!

TG
edit on 10/9/2011 by timidgal because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 9 2011 @ 02:45 AM
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reply to post by JiggyPotamus
 
There seems to be a few threads addressing this type of sighting but the labels of the threads are different and it's hard to find in a general search.

Anyway, with so many people describing what seems to be a similar sighting, it gives credence to opening it up for discussion. Thanks for sharing your experience and if you merely click on the "YouTube Link" and watch it in full screen, you'll see it pretty clearly starting around 22 secs. Sounds like you've seen it with your own eyes already though.

Thanks again for replying!

TG



posted on Oct, 9 2011 @ 03:27 AM
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Originally posted by timidgal

Originally posted by nineix
Thank you for posting the video.
Unfortunately, since the video is of a faint blinking dot that moves around the screen with no reference points to discern whether the movement is the light, or shaky hand cam movement, the video says more against itself than it does for whatever you might think it is.

I'm not sure how far above the horizon this little blinking light was, but, it's a common illusion with commercial jet moving away from a viewer low in the sky to appear stationary, especially while they are climbing in altitude as they get further away. The flashing running lights would thus appear to be stationary in the sky, and if the jet is far away, you may not even hear it.
The blinking light shown on the video seems to match the tempo of flashing running lights on passenger jets.

That of course is only speculation.

Edit: Also, if you have an iPhone, or an Android, I understand there's an app that allows you to point your phone at objects in the sky, and it'll show you what that object is; satellite, planet, star, whatever. I don't know what the app is called snce I don't have one of those fancy phones.
edit on 9-10-2011 by nineix because: (no reason given)

Point well made and next time I'll move the camera down on the tri-pod to show the line of horizon and smooth movement. Constructive skepticism is always a healthy thing and I accept your comments in good nature but unless there has been a jet liner outside my window every night for almost two weeks in the same exact spot (with three others sitting stationary in a straight vertical line right next to it - same formation every night), I don't think that's what this is.

BTW, I don't have one of those phones either and nothing is worse at taking videos than my Blackberry. I'm hoping that one of these days I'll be able to get some type of telescope with a camera.

EDIT: Just to be clear, Blackberry wasn't used to take this video as it never would have come out. Was a regular camera sitting on a tri-pod in movie mode.

Thanks for the reply!

TG
edit on 10/9/2011 by timidgal because: (no reason given)


No worries about you not having one of those fancy phones. If you have an mates with one of those phones, however, I might recommend having one over and using the app just to try clearing things up, in the name of science and all.
Something else to also consider: The stars, the moon, and everything rotate across the sky in a predictable way every night. Do these objects move -rise & set like the rest of the stars? When you first see them, are they in the East, West, or another direction, and over time do they get higher in the sky or lower?

Objects low in the sky are particular in being effected by atmospheric lensing effects and other local meteorological peculiarities like dust, smog, and other things. It's something to be kept in mind. Heat shimmer also causes twinkling, especially low to the horizon, similar to heat ripples you may have personally witnessed on hot summer days coming off of roads, or the bonnet of a car when seen at certain angles.

I'm not saying that what you are seeing is not unusual, but, before labeling it as something unusual, it's good practice to go about testing every possible real explanation. When everything possible is ruled out, even if only the impossible remains, re-test the possible explanations again, and if the impossible is still the only thing left, then the impossible it may very well be.



posted on Oct, 9 2011 @ 04:06 AM
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reply to post by nineix
 


Something else to also consider: The stars, the moon, and everything rotate across the sky in a predictable way every night. Do these objects move -rise & set like the rest of the stars? When you first see them, are they in the East, West, or another direction, and over time do they get higher in the sky or lower?


I've been seeing them initially in the east and yes, they do behave like other stars in that they get higher in the sky as the night progresses.


I'm not saying that what you are seeing is not unusual, but, before labeling it as something unusual, it's good practice to go about testing every possible real explanation. When everything possible is ruled out, even if only the impossible remains, re-test the possible explanations again, and if the impossible is still the only thing left, then the impossible it may very well be.


Absolutely couldn't agree more. It was unusual for me in that I've never seen a star's brightness and color alternate quite like that before but I'm in total agreement that there could be a perfectly logical scientific reason for it of which I'm unaware. You and I are on the same page, my friend!



posted on Oct, 9 2011 @ 10:30 AM
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reply to post by timidgal
 


Timidgal - From previous threads you and I were involved in, I remember you living somewhat near me on the East Coast, no?

Have you checked to see if it is Jupiter? Jupiter is in full force in the eastern sky right now. It has even caught the attention of my boyfriend who is the biggest skeptic and non-astronomical person I know. He was all excited one night to have seen a bright "something" that he had never seen before, changing colors from green to orange in our sky.

Alas, it was Jupiter. Just a thought, check coordinates to see if it is Jupiter...

Much love girl : )



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 07:46 PM
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reply to post by harlot7
 

Hey there, harlot7. Great to hear from you and yes, your memory is precise about my location. I have to tell you that the program I spoke of, Stellarium, has taught me a myriad of things since I downloaded it and although I didn't know how to use it affectively on that particular night, I've since had some time to fiddle around with it. As a result, I've come to the same conclusion you inferred and I do believe it probably was Jupiter. I spent last night sitting outside my building with my computer in my lap comparing all of the planets and constellations reflected on the program. It truly is amazing how easily and quickly I came to locate and recognize certain constellations I hadn't even known existed.

Thanks for the great feedback and if you have the ability to download the program, I would highly recommend it. It's freeware and I ran it through the virus check with no problems. Sounds like your boyfriend might enjoy it as well!

Great to hear from ya and sending the same sentiments back your way...

TG


EDIT: Just realized I posted the link to the program in another thread. Here's the link to Stellarium. Enjoy!

edit on 10/10/2011 by timidgal because: self-explanatory



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 07:59 PM
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Originally posted by CeeRZ
I've seen some wildly "twinkly" stars myself though, and often wondered. But it's probably a planet you are seeing... they tend to twinkle a lot more strangely than the rest.


Just to let you know ( and anyone else who didnt know..) that planets dont 'twinkle' at all. Here is a link that will explain better than I.


WHY PLANETS DO NOT 'TWINKLE'



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 02:09 PM
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As annella says, planets do not twinkle.
Was the star you saw very bright, changing colour from white to blue to red every few moments?



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