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The Moon....Who saw it last night and tonight.

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posted on Oct, 9 2011 @ 05:37 PM
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reply to post by Manhater
 


Three words

"Grow a brain"




posted on Oct, 9 2011 @ 06:04 PM
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reply to post by mnmcandiez
 


I have an excuse. I'm blond.

What's yours?



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 10:03 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by CherubBaby
 


Source


that Rome Tribune-Herald is pretty funny. Did you look at the rest of it?

i like the quote: "The United States Government has announced it's whiskey rules. The best whiskey rule is to rule it out."

do they mean ruling out the whiskey or ruling out the "rule"? silly humans....


edit on 10-10-2011 by galactix because: (no reason given)

edit on 10-10-2011 by galactix because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 10:32 AM
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just cuz the Coyote in me likes to stir up trouble occasionally...

i'd like to point out that there still remain subtle issues in Luna's orbit...stuff that cannot be currently explained.

from source:
"One of the phenomena of particular interest in connection with polar motion is a wobble of the figure of the Earth around the rotation axis with a period of roughly 14 months. this "Chandler wobble" would die down with time and figure axis would line up with the rotation axis if there were not something that frequently re-excites it"

source

as far as i can tell, current gravity based theory cannot account for Luna's subtle wobbly dancing...?

perhaps Phage will educate us all.



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 10:40 AM
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and also: gravitational lumpy Luna.

"What happened? The Moon itself plunged the subsatellite to its death. That's the conclusion of Alex S. Konopliv, planetary scientist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena."

""The Moon is extraordinarily lumpy, gravitationally speaking," Konopliv continues." really? how weird is that.

Would this be more of our "constant average density" universe?


source



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 10:55 AM
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The Moon looks perfectly alright over this way!...



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 03:59 PM
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reply to post by galactix
 


A quick look at Wikipedia shows that the Earth wobble (that text you copied is about the Earth wobble, not the Moon's) was predicted by Newton and Euler, so I think it's included in all present theories.



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 04:01 PM
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reply to post by galactix
 


It's not that weird, what's weird is the composition of the Moon, with more dense areas in a less dense whole, like pieces of fruit inside a cake.



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 04:14 PM
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reply to post by ProudBird
 


nice program. Thanks for pointing it out. I started using it a few weeks ago. It can be a great teacher. I suggest learning astrology instead of using a program that can be manipulated by who every controls the product.

Peace to you.



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 05:29 PM
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reply to post by Buford2
 


I suppose you meant astronomy.



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 05:49 PM
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Denser areas of the moon could be caused by larger iron asteroid and more denser asteroid strikes coupled with lighter comet strikes on a largely geologically or tectonically dead body (the moon).



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 06:27 PM
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Originally posted by ProudBird
reply to post by nosacrificenofreedom
 




I am an amature astronomer.....


Well then, you should be gently corrected on this mistake, to improve your level of comprehension about the science of astronomy:



First off the moon does not rotate....


Yes, it does. It rotates about its own axis once every approximately 28 days.

That is why


.... the same side of the moon always facing the earth.



As it orbits the Earth, it takes approximately 28 to 29 days, per orbit. Therefore, we see only the hemisphere that is facing us...actually, we see a bit more than that, more than 50%. (Because its period of rotation is not exactly matched to its period of orbit). This is known as "gravitational lock", sometimes called "tidal locking"....and is very common in our Solar System, with other moons around other planets.

You can research this online, in many, many locations.




Thankyou for bringing this up. There is much debate about this. According to the latest information on some of the sites I have visited. This is all a matter of perspective if we look at the moon from the earth we will not see any varience in terrain, the same side will always be facing those of us veiwing the moon. If we are in space orbiting our sun at say about the same speed as our earth we would see a complete rotation once every 27.322 earth days. In a way we are both right and as always it has to do with perception! here's the site i found the info on www.grantchronicles.com... Just to let you know, I am not one of those wackos that always has to be right. I was going to conceed right off the bat but decided to look up the info to be sure because I have read about "gravitational, planet or tidal locking" before and always thought those objects had not been classified as rotating. Well thankyou for the shout out and i hope this clears things up!



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 06:30 PM
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Originally posted by CherubBaby
reply to post by Manhater
 


Thanks for the thread. I will tell you something that should interest you and some others on here. The Earth is in a wobble or the moon's orbit is in disarray.

No, it is not. What you are seeing is normal field rotation. Field rotation will occur from any non-polar aligned perspective, so unless you're standing at one of the poles or are viewing it from a polar aligned perspective, viewing the moon in the normal fashion by eye will show some degree of field rotation.

Here's a video timelapse I shot showing field rotation over nearly an hour of time, followed by viewing the moon from a polar aligned perspective on the same night over the same amount of time:

The moon's apparent "tilt" is just an effect of viewing it from a non-polar aligned perspective. There's nothing wrong with its orientation when viewed properly in a polar aligned manner.



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 09:53 PM
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Originally posted by ArMaP
reply to post by galactix
 


A quick look at Wikipedia shows that the Earth wobble (that text you copied is about the Earth wobble, not the Moon's) was predicted by Newton and Euler, so I think it's included in all present theories.


You are correct, that was about earth.
still, the chandler wobble remains unexplained. You'd see this if you continue reading the same paper.

From this paper are comments on Luna's wobble.

"It is also worthwhile to mention the observation of an apparent free libration of the moon... One of these modes is analogous to the chandler wobble...Without suitable excitation torques....however the semi-analytic results may not be sufficiently accurate"

i woulda included more, but the dern thing was an image an' i hate typing...

She wobbles and we don't know why. So does Earth apparently. Newton dealt with the simplest of the celestial motions, he was busy inventing the calculus and well so i'll give him a break...can you show me where Euler predicts these multi-mode long duration wobbles?



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 09:59 PM
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Originally posted by ArMaP
reply to post by galactix
 


It's not that weird, what's weird is the composition of the Moon, with more dense areas in a less dense whole, like pieces of fruit inside a cake.


agreed.
To me it's just lovely mystery. I like knowledge, but like abilities, it's good to know the limits.

and i get irritated when blow hards start talking about how "we got it all figured out". Reminds of a turn of the (20th) century patent admin who opinioned that we should just close the patent office cuz everything had already been invented.



posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 04:27 PM
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Originally posted by galactix
Newton dealt with the simplest of the celestial motions, he was busy inventing the calculus and well so i'll give him a break...can you show me where Euler predicts these multi-mode long duration wobbles?

I only repeated what the Wikipedia article says, because that's something I do not really know.


I suppose these are the relevant equations. See also this.

I hope it helps.



posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 05:15 PM
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What we see of the moon constantly changes.



Also the size of the moon we see constantly changes.



The size also can slightly fluctuate every 50 years give or take, like we just witnessed earlier this year in one of the largest full Supermoon's we saw since the 1950's (I think).

Anyway I had and tried to find but must have deleted, a time lapse super great high resolution beautiful movie of the moon traversing the night sky in less than a minute, as a crescent (lets say) it would rise (lets use as an example) as a letter u, and set as a letter n, and thats because of the earth rotating. Things in the sky flip over from our perspective through the night.

To get 2 identical photos of the moon you would have to wait many many years to achieve. The earth and moon wobbles, the lunar distance from earth constantly changes as it's phases change at slightly different intervals.



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 12:03 AM
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does anyone know the name of the star next to the moon in this picture? its the brightest star thats out tonight



edit on 12-10-2011 by Humble1 because: i was trying to insert a picture



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 12:19 AM
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reply to post by Humble1
 

That's no star. That's a planet!

Jupiter.



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 12:20 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


thanks i always see it when i go out for a smoke and never knew that.




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