The Moon....Who saw it last night and tonight.

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posted on Oct, 8 2011 @ 05:31 PM
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Originally posted by WhoDat09

Originally posted by Manhater
reply to post by mugger
 


duh,


I don't like this program. all you see is white dots, not what is actually there.
edit on 8-10-2011 by Manhater because: (no reason given)


If you click the little white dots it'll tell you what it is. Also I like to put the constellations "on".


yes, those little white dots are actually the stars ..... please don't switch on the outlines to the constellations, because then some ppl will tell us that they can't see the lines when they look outside, so something is wrong, again .....




posted on Oct, 8 2011 @ 05:33 PM
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Originally posted by mugger
reply to post by Manhater
 


Enable the nebulas and zoom in on those. You will appreciate those . Andromeda, Crab Nebula.


nope, you can't do that, because that is not the way they look to human eyes .... then somebody will complain, because they can just see a faintish, greenish blur, and NOT what they see on the photo, so somebody has been manipulating everything again .... sighhhhhh, that friggin NASA, always manipulating pictures,
edit on 8/10/2011 by Hellhound604 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 8 2011 @ 05:42 PM
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Originally posted by mugger
reply to post by Manhater
 


Enable the nebulas and zoom in on those. You will appreciate those . Andromeda, Crab Nebula.


Maybe it's a ring nebula lyre I'm seeing lol

Grr can't even use print screen, what a bummer.



posted on Oct, 8 2011 @ 05:47 PM
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reply to post by Manhater
 


Print screen works fine for me, and there is also the "snipping tool" with windows, don't know if you have windows but it works well also.



posted on Oct, 8 2011 @ 05:50 PM
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I see this turned into a stellarium thread

Well at least, hope this proves useful for those new to stellarium.
went out and looked at the moon in the SE for my area. Looks fairly normal.
edit on 10/8/2011 by mugger because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 8 2011 @ 05:55 PM
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Originally posted by oxbow

Originally posted by CherubBaby
www.woodlands-junior.kent.sch.uk...
The above link is for the site that shows without a doubt that I am correct. Shame on those who dis-info us. and Nasa and wikipedia for example and few others on ATS .. Shame on you.. Telling people a pig is a goat and a goat is an elephant...

Love the way give a site produced by a UK Junior School (aimed at 8-11 year-olds) as proof yet dismiss hard science, observation and photographic evidence as




Springtime's waning crescent is a forward "C," with horns pointing back toward the winter solstice to the sun's right.
Autumn's morning crescent has horns aimed high, toward summer's solar apex now trailing behind.
The above description applies to locations throughout mid-northern latitudes, encompassing the entire contiguous 48 states as well as Europe, Asia and the Far East. Residents of temperate zones in the southern hemisphere would see much the same thing, only mirror-reversed.

Citizens of the Tropics see the moon's horns pointing upward throughout the year, and never horizontally


Read more: magicvalley.com...

edit on 8-10-2011 by Char-Lee because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 8 2011 @ 05:59 PM
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Originally posted by mugger
I see this turned into a stellarium thread

Well at least, hope this proves useful for those new to stellarium.
went out and looked at the moon in the SE for my area. Looks fairly normal.
edit on 10/8/2011 by mugger because: (no reason given)


No I'm still uninstalling it.



posted on Oct, 8 2011 @ 06:14 PM
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reply to post by Manhater
 


Learn science please.



posted on Oct, 8 2011 @ 06:19 PM
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Originally posted by mnmcandiez
reply to post by Manhater
 


Learn science please.


Be more specific. I have learned science. Like, duh.....Taking Biology right now, um got my certificates in Pharmacy. Only, so much science my brain can handle at the moment.



posted on Oct, 8 2011 @ 06:29 PM
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OK I took this picture of the moon a few minutes ago:



looks normal to me and it's right where it should be!



posted on Oct, 8 2011 @ 06:35 PM
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reply to post by Manhater
 


It's actually very basic science.

As a night photographer i'm very aware of the moon's position and it's cycles, as it's important in terms of exposure and such.
I just got back from a night photographing the Draconid meteor rain.
Nothing out of the ordinary with the moon, just a bit to bright(almost full moon) for observing and recording the meteors.

I did take a picture of the moon which i will put in a new thread
"what's hiding behind our moon?"
Ooh i know, it's just lens flare



posted on Oct, 8 2011 @ 06:42 PM
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Originally posted by intergalactic fire
reply to post by Manhater
 


It's actually very basic science.

As a night photographer i'm very aware of the moon's position and it's cycles, as it's important in terms of exposure and such.
I just got back from a night photographing the Draconid meteor rain.
Nothing out of the ordinary with the moon, just a bit to bright(almost full moon) for observing and recording the meteors.

I did take a picture of the moon which i will put in a new thread
"what's hiding behind our moon?"
Ooh i know, it's just lens flare


Looking forward to your image.



posted on Oct, 8 2011 @ 07:11 PM
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reply to post by Manhater
 

I wasn't really going to post it or make a thread on it.
Because you asked, i will post it here tomorrow

It's actual a long exposure shot of the moon between some clouds
edit on 8-10-2011 by intergalactic fire because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 8 2011 @ 07:11 PM
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Here is another photo, taken some minutes ago (4 hours and 12 minutes after the previous one), and we can see that the Moon looks like it rotated a little clockwise, when compared with the previous photo.


Looking at the photo I took in the first hours of Friday, we can see that the Moon, close to setting, was even more "rotated" clockwise. In the same way, if I had a photo of the Moon appearing over the horizon, it would look as rotated counter-clockwise when compared with the photo taken 4 hours ago.

That doesn't mean that the Moon rotates, it's just a question of perspective; if we rotate our head to keep the Moon's north pole in the same direction as the top of our head we can see that the Moon is always in the same position, but as we are (usually) perpendicular to the Earth's surface, we do not see the Moon in the same way the Earth "sees" it.

PS: the Moon setting is going to be too late for me, maybe some five hours from now, so the most likely is that I will not post a photo of the Moon close to setting.



posted on Oct, 8 2011 @ 07:15 PM
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reply to post by qonone
 


Might have been a moondog...a ring around the moon, it is similar to a sundog, a rainbow around the sun

Here in Alaska a ring around the moon generally indicates it's gonna get freaking a$$ cold



posted on Oct, 8 2011 @ 08:06 PM
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OP --

It is completely normal for the Moon to rise (and set) later each night than it did the previous night. Therefore, the Moon will be in a different part of the sky relative to your trees at -- say -- midnight tonight than it was at midnight last night.

Also, because it rises later, it will always be in a different place in the sky relative to the other stars every night. It is completely normal for it NOT to be in the same place relative to the stars tonight as it was last night.

...and to answer those other people commenting on how the moon looks different than the think it used to look (i.e., the crescent Moon with "points up" or "points down"), it should be noted that as the Moon tracks across the sky on any given night, it's orientation will change relative to its nearest horizon -- that is it may look more "points up" when it rises, but look more "points down" when it sets.
edit on 10/8/2011 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 9 2011 @ 12:50 AM
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reply to post by Manhater
 


The earth rotates.....the stars and the moon change perspective for that reason. The moon rises and sets every night. If it didn't, we would have an eclipse every day.



posted on Oct, 9 2011 @ 02:50 AM
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reply to post by Manhater
 


Learn the scientific method then.

There's a lot more than science than biology, isn't that a mandatory high school class anyway? lol



All your posts are horrible uneducated assumptions and ridiculous doom day scenarios that hold no clout in the real world.



posted on Oct, 9 2011 @ 03:18 AM
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reply to post by mnmcandiez
 


I did, it went through one side and out the other.


I'm taking College Biology, thank you very much.


Not everyone, is smart as whip like you....

edit on 9-10-2011 by Manhater because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 9 2011 @ 05:36 AM
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reply to post by Manhater
 


I'm not even claiming to be smart. I just have general knowledge and the capacity to do research on a subject before declaring huge heavenly bodies have somehow magically changed and I'm the only human that realized it. I mean there are only thousands of amateur astronomers out there and billions of humans that watch the sky. This is really just a common sense/street smarts/gullibility/ego trip issue at play.


And the thing is you do this in nearly every thread I have ever seen you post on as I tend to remember the doom sayers avatars because they are so incredibly annoying. You continue to deny facts yet you are on a site whose motto is deny ignorance.

I think its time for you to see the light and enter the world of do some research!~!
edit on 10/9/2011 by mnmcandiez because: (no reason given)
edit on 10/9/2011 by mnmcandiez because: (no reason given)





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