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strange object going around the moon plus radar reports about ufos.

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posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 09:54 PM
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this happened to my brother and i when we were in primary school when we were leaving to go home for the day about 3.50pm when the bell went and everyone was rushing to get home.
we both happened to look at exactly the same time at the full moon which was in a cloudless sky and boyh of us noticed a silver object very small going from left to right following the circumference of the moon.
considering i was about ten years old and he was two years older plus ufos were something i had never heard of in those days, it has always puzzled me.
this happened about 40 years ago and i have always wondered what it could have been.
it moved at the same speed and never appeared again to us.
for both of us to look at it at the same time was very weird.
one other thing happened to him when he was an air traffic controller in later years for a company i wont mention, 4 of his collegues including himself saw ufos darting about on radar for a while and reported to their superior. few days later, the 4 of them were split up to different bases all over the world and told it never happened!




posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 09:59 PM
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Originally posted by scotsdavy1
we were leaving to go home for the day about 3.50pm when the bell went and everyone was rushing to get home.
we both happened to look at exactly the same time at the full moon which was in a cloudless sky



Just to be technically pedantic here, but it is IMPOSSIBLE for a full moon, or anything even remotely like full, to be in the sky at 3:50pm.

Unless you live near one of the north or south poles.



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 10:02 PM
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reply to post by alfa1
 


Umm no it is not, I play baseball, and everyday for the past week at practice we have been able to see the moon at around the same time if the sky was clear. I am from California btw. I actually mentioned it to one of my teammates today, i said "hey look we got the moon and the sun out today".
edit on 7-10-2011 by 4thhorsemen because: (no reason given)

edit on 7-10-2011 by 4thhorsemen because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 10:03 PM
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reply to post by 4thhorsemen
 


I agree, we've had the moon out at 3:00PM here in Texas this week as well



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 10:09 PM
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Originally posted by 4thhorsemen
reply to post by alfa1
 


Umm no it is not, I play baseball, and everyday for the past week at practice we have been able to see the moon at around the same time if the sky was clear. I am from California btw. I actually mentioned it to one of my teammates today, i said "hey look we got the moon and the sun out today".
edit on 7-10-2011 by 4thhorsemen because: (no reason given)

edit on 7-10-2011 by 4thhorsemen because: (no reason given)


Well, sir, go out and look at the Moon at this moment, and you will see that it is not "full." Evidently, you have a serious misunderstanding of what a "full" Moon is. Some of us don't suffer with that problem.



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 10:28 PM
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The "waxing gibbous" phase of the moon can be seen in the afternoon...it's one phase away from a full moon. I think you nay-sayers should keep your shirts on.



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 10:33 PM
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Originally posted by alfa1

Originally posted by scotsdavy1
we were leaving to go home for the day about 3.50pm when the bell went and everyone was rushing to get home.
we both happened to look at exactly the same time at the full moon which was in a cloudless sky



Just to be technically pedantic here, but it is IMPOSSIBLE for a full moon, or anything even remotely like full, to be in the sky at 3:50pm.

Unless you live near one of the north or south poles.


The OP does live in Scotland, latitude 57ish. I'm able to see an almost full moon in the daytime, and I'm only at around 52 latitude. It's full on the 12th of this month, yesterday the moon and the sun looked at about the same level in the opposite sides of the sky, sometime in the late afternoon, 4ish.



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 11:32 PM
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reply to post by scotsdavy1
 


That would make it in the 1970 ballpark, and the Russians also had missions going on as well as the US. If you can pinpoint the date, you can either eliminate or verify a spacecraft sighting. Here's a 1960-1970 space exploration timeline link Hope this helps.



posted on Oct, 8 2011 @ 12:04 AM
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reply to post by Aliensun
 


Where in MY post do you see me referencing a full moon? I said I was able to see the moon, never said it was a full moon, clearly your reading comprehension is flawed.
edit on 8-10-2011 by 4thhorsemen because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 8 2011 @ 01:05 AM
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bad post on my part retracted
edit on 8-10-2011 by vesco because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 8 2011 @ 05:46 AM
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Originally posted by alfa1

Originally posted by scotsdavy1
we were leaving to go home for the day about 3.50pm when the bell went and everyone was rushing to get home.
we both happened to look at exactly the same time at the full moon which was in a cloudless sky



Just to be technically pedantic here, but it is IMPOSSIBLE for a full moon, or anything even remotely like full, to be in the sky at 3:50pm.

Unless you live near one of the north or south poles.


i can assure you i saw a full moon as did my brother and i dont take kindly to be called a liar. i told exactly what i saw and even an hour ago here there was nearloy a full moon showing here..............
i stated the facts as we saw it so dont even go there....................i have nothing to gain or loose by telling this and at least others can verify it, this was over 40 years ago and it was getting dark at the time as it was near the winter time here.



posted on Oct, 8 2011 @ 07:19 AM
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Originally posted by scotsdavy1

i can assure you i saw a full moon as did my brother and i dont take kindly to be called a liar. i told exactly what i saw and even an hour ago here there was nearloy a full moon showing here....



I wasnt calling you a liar, I said the truth, and also said I was just being "technically pedantic".
A full moon cannot be seen at 3:50 pm.

Current moon, now is = 88 percent full.
Not full until wednesday, 12 October .


edit on 8-10-2011 by alfa1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 8 2011 @ 05:57 PM
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reply to post by alfa1
 


as you can see here, full moon can happen any time iof the day or night,

Full Moon by Luc Viatour www.lucnix.be

First, let’s begin with the definition of “Full Moon”. A Full Moon occurs when the Moon is diametrically opposite the Sun, as seen from the Earth. In this configuration, the entire lit hemisphere of the Moon’s surface is visible from Earth, which is what makes it “Full”. There is an actual instant of the exactly Full Moon, that is the exact instant that the Moon is directly opposite the Sun. Therefore when you see timings listed for the Full Moon they will usually include the exact time (hh:mm) that the Moon is 180° round from the Sun (we call this point opposition).

Here’s a list of the times of all Full Moons between June 2011 and June 2012:
Month Date of Full Moon
Time of Full Moon (UT)
June 2011 15 June 2014*
July 2011 15 July 0640*
August 2011 13 August 1857*
September 2011 12 September 0927*
October 2011 12 October 0206*
November 2011 10 November 2016
December 2011 10 December 1436
January 2012 09 January 0730
February 2012 07 February 2154
March 2012 08 March 0939
April 2012 06 April 1919*
May 2012 06 May 0335*
June 2012 04 June 1112*

* UK observers should add on one hour for BST

As you can see from this table, the instant of the Full Moon can occur at any time of day, even in the daytime when the Moon is below the horizon. So most often when we see a “Full Moon” in the sky it is not exactly full, it is a little bit less than full, being a few hours ahead or behind the instant of the Full Moon. I’ll refer to this with “” marks, to distinguish this from the instant of the Full Moon (they look virtually identical in the sky).

The Moon rises and sets, like the Sun does, rising towards the east and setting towards the west, reaching its highest point due south around midnight (although not exactly at midnight, just like the Sun does not usually reach its highest point exactly at noon). And like with the Sun the maximum distance above the horizon of the “Full Moon” varies over the year.

The Sun is at its highest due south around noon on the Summer Solstice (20 or 21 June) and at its lowest due south around noon on the Winter Solstice (21 or 22 Dec) (of course the Sun is often lower than this, as it rises and sets, but we’re talking here about the lowest high point at mid-day, i.e. the day of the year in which, when the Sun is at its highest point that day, that height is lowest…)

And because Full Moons occur when the Moon is directly opposite the Sun, you can imagine the Moon and Sun as sitting on either sides of a celestial see-saw: on the day when the Sun is highest in the middle of the day (in Summer), the Moon is at its lowest high point at midnight; and on the day when the Sun is at its lowest high point in the middle of the day (in Winter), the Moon is at its highest high point at midnight.

This means, in practical terms, that Summer “Full Moons” are always very low on the horizon, while Winter “Full Moons” can be very high overhead.

Here’s a table of the altitude of the “Full Moon” when due south. Remember the times in this table don’t match the exact time of the Full Moon, but instead have been chosen as the closest in time to that instant, and so have be labelled “Full Moon” (in quotes).



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