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Why do people say "God" without giving the specific name of said God?

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posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 02:11 AM
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I've begun to notice this more and more people will say things like "Go to god." or "Pray to god" without ever classifying which god they meant. Do they mean Yahweh the Christian god or Thor or Loki or Zeus?Am I just suppose to assume someone is a Christian because they used the word God or what? It also seems rather cocky , like you think your good is the one true god. Now I know in the bible Yahweh says he's the one true good but other then that there's no real specific proof that there's only one good out there. Once again religions like Hinduism and Norse paganism is both have multiple gods.




posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 02:18 AM
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Their Gods? I have no idea, it makes no sense at times. This # is muddled.



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 02:22 AM
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Judeo-Christian has God's real name as taboo to use.



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 02:26 AM
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Originally posted by CynicalDrivel
Judeo-Christian has God's real name as taboo to use.



What?
What is taboo about "Julie"?



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 02:29 AM
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reply to post by Reptius
 



I know that not many people pray to Thor, Odin or Neptune anymore. Knowledge have given people a different God to worship. And that knowledge comes from religious propaganda. You can't change someones beliefs over night, but with forced propaganda you will change it over time, as the old belief system dies with the believer.



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 02:31 AM
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That verbal sentence is referring to an existing/has existed object - an individual that has passed through reality. When we say to go pray to God - we are notably referring to the one that is real and not imaginary. The one that exists outside of our finite understanding and lack of knowledge to realize is actually there
edit on 2011-1010-07 by jpaul because: (no reason given)


Certainly the prayer that is prayed to the said God - will reach the ears of the one that actually exists regardless of our feeble knowledge capacity
edit on 2011-1010-07 by jpaul because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 02:34 AM
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He/She and or it hasn't introduced itself to me yet.

It's sorta like when you don't know someone and you call them "that girl" or "that guy".



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 02:34 AM
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It depends on your religion or what you believe in as a spiritual entity.


Elohim, Jehovah or Yahweh



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 02:38 AM
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reply to post by Vandalour
 


Technically it is more safe to say God than to say Muhammad or God of Muhammad since that God may not even exist - the prayer will reach the ears of the God that exists



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 02:45 AM
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reply to post by Reptius
 


I became disenchanted with the God of the bible for my own reasons. As for my God, his name is prime creator. He isnt listed in any bible. The difference between my God, Prime Creator, and the god of the bible is my Prime creator is pure love light and energy etc, where as the god of the bible is a vengeful God.



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 02:52 AM
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Originally posted by Magantice
reply to post by Reptius
 


I became disenchanted with the God of the bible for my own reasons. As for my God, his name is prime creator. He isnt listed in any bible. The difference between my God, Prime Creator, and the god of the bible is my Prime creator is pure love light and energy etc, where as the god of the bible is a vengeful God.


How does the depiction of God sending himself in human form to justify our sins so that we wouldn't have to pay the penalty ourselves portray a vengeful God - I think too often we attribute historical context/situations found in the bible with the characteristics we attach to the God of the Bible. Any open-minded individual (believer or not) can see that Christianity portrays a God of unconditional love.
edit on 2011-1010-07 by jpaul because: (no reason given)
edit on 2011-1010-07 by jpaul because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 03:00 AM
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reply to post by Reptius
 

It appears as if you're having difficulties making up your mind, and deciding whether or not to capitalize it.

You managed to work both ways in though, and quite a bit, so basically:

[color=E4E8A5]Your god is God.



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 03:02 AM
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post removed for serious violation of ATS Terms & Conditions



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 03:09 AM
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Anyone who is a monotheist who refers to "God" is by definition referring to the only god they believe in, so it's the Judeo-Christian-Muslim-Sikh-etc. god. Other "gods" to them are either false gods that do not even exist or, in some beliefs, demons who are deceiving people.

In Judaism the name of God is not meant to be spoken, except in very specific situations (once a year by the High Priest of the ancient Jewish Temple). The name is written YHWH in Hebrew, but the exact vowel pronunciation that goes with those consonants is intentionally left a mystery (Hebrew doesn't spell out vowels in the ancient form of the writing system, and even in modern times they aren't usually used though vowel notations do exist.) Supposedly only the High Priests knew the proper way to speak the name.

YHWH was translated eventually into English (via early German Biblical scholarship) as Jehovah: (J in German is pronounced with a "Y" sound, and W with a "V" sound which is how things got mixed up by the time it got to English). In English it probably should be written as "YeHoWaH," which would be one possible pronunciation, one possible arrangement of vowels with those consonants. You can play around with any vowel arrangement and it MIGHT be the right one (nobody really knows for sure), but when people do say it these days (which if they are devout they shouldn't), the general consensus is that it should be pronounced as "YaHWeH."

Judaism has a lot of other words used for God, and even in those cases, when they aren't even using the real name, Jews will abbreviate the title or what have you (like "The Lord") just to be sure they aren't giving offense to God. Even the word God, when written in English by Jews is written "G-d" just to be safe.
edit on 10/7/2011 by LifeInDeath because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 03:15 AM
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God is a personal thing. We tend to know God as The Great Architect of The Universe (TGAOTU). I believe God to be the all creative force behind the whole of existance. It has no personality and resides within us all. I therefore feel that God has no name and would prefer TGAOTU or God to signify a being or force that is infinately more superior than I.

I do not know or understand God, to do so would make me as God. I do not prey to God or am I fearfull of God. Although I do acknowledge and respect God for what it is.



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 03:26 AM
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reply to post by Reptius
 


When you say more and more "people" are saying this, which people are you referring to? Whites? Blacks? Young? Old? Students? Actors? Americans? Muslims?

That air youve been breathing sice youve been born, what air is it? Yours, mine, ours, cold, humid, warm, american, earths, good, polluted, bad, heavy, lite?

Rethink your original question know that it has been turned back on yourself with regards to all words you yourself use.



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 04:30 AM
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reply to post by Reptius
 


GOD is one, and GOD is all. We are GOD and GOD is us!
Are you gonna copy/paste all of our names together? Because that's the real name!

GOD is not a person, so has no name.



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 04:57 AM
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it doesnt matter, no Gods exist in the way people think of them today



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 05:00 AM
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Jesus, 2000+ years ago spoke in ancient Aramaic

The Aramaic word for "God" in the language of the New Testament is ʼĔlāhā, or Alaha in later Syriac, as used by Assyrian Christians.

Arabic-speakers of all Abrahamic faiths, including Christians and Jews, use the word "Allah" to mean "God".[7] The Christian Arabs of today have no other word for 'God' than 'Allah'.[14] (Even the Arabic-descended Maltese language of Malta, whose population is almost entirely Roman Catholic, uses Alla for 'God'.) Arab Christians for example use terms Allāh al-ʾab (الله الأب) meaning God the Father, Allāh al-ibn (الله الابن) mean God the Son, and Allāh ar-rūḥ al-quds (الله الروح القدس) meaning God the Holy Spirit (See God in Christianity for the Christian concept of God).

source


It is generally agreed that Jesus of Nazareth primarily spoke Aramaic, perhaps along with some Hebrew and Greek (although there is some debate as to the degree). The towns of Nazareth and Capernaum, where Jesus lived, were primarily Aramaic-speaking communities, although Greek was widely spoken in the major cities of the Mediterranean Basin.
...
Most of the apostles from the Galilee region also spoke Aramaic. The message of Christianity spread (primarily among Jewish Aramaic-speaking enclaves) throughout Judaea, Syria and Mesopotamia, and even to Kerala, India in Aramaic

source

All that's really needed is to know when someone says god, it's their god.
For all we know their god could have told them ..."hey, next time you pray to me, you can call me Bert"



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 05:04 AM
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reply to post by CitizenNum287119327
 


if you talk to god your religious, if god talks back your insane lol





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