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93% of Large Near Earth Asteroids Found and Pose No Risk

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posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 11:34 PM
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reply to post by lifeform11
 


I keep being asked this... The method is described in the article.

In a nutshell. They surveyed an area and applied their findings universally giving them an estimated total. Yes there could be more or less than 7%, but they're unlikely to be out by much.




posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 11:37 PM
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Originally posted by muzzleflash
reply to post by Insomniac
 


You know what I found to be an uneasy coincidence?

That we keep using the figure "911" in relation to the topic of potential asteroid disaster scenarios.

That is quite the coincidence I must say.

They should have waited to find another one to release this story. That was it would be 912 instead, and the coincidental connotations would be avoided.


You know, I noticed that and thought the same thing. I gues being scientists they're not as 'sensitive' to that kind of thing as most of us on ATS.



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 11:54 PM
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reply to post by Insomniac
 

If you type "NASA neowise" in ATS search there's at least half a dozen threads on this topic already, though many were made when NASA held their conference, this one:

www.ustream.tv...

They present their results and then tackle questions and answers, and you know there had to be a question about Nibiru so that made some more threads on ATS.



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 11:57 PM
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reply to post by Arbitrageur
 


Ah, I searched under Asteroids! Thanks for the link.



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 02:27 AM
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reply to post by Insomniac
 
While I agree with everyone else that 93% discovered leaves 7% and it's all pretty shaky guess work to get those numbers, it's also quite impressive. If part of your intent is to note how effective NEOWISE and other efforts with similar goals have been, it really is worth a look.

A cursory glance at Near Earth Object lists shows a virtual explosion of names assigned in the past 10 years, so I definitely give a star for bringing this story. I'd imagine we're learning a heck of a lot by now identifying and keeping an eye on as many of these as current methods might allow.

Perhaps the work done here will help avoid an impact with one that would really do damage. This is the kind of science that ought to inspire kids to the subject.



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 04:04 AM
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Originally posted by Wrabbit2000
reply to post by Insomniac
 
While I agree with everyone else that 93% discovered leaves 7% and it's all pretty shaky guess work to get those numbers, it's also quite impressive. If part of your intent is to note how effective NEOWISE and other efforts with similar goals have been, it really is worth a look.

A cursory glance at Near Earth Object lists shows a virtual explosion of names assigned in the past 10 years, so I definitely give a star for bringing this story. I'd imagine we're learning a heck of a lot by now identifying and keeping an eye on as many of these as current methods might allow.

Perhaps the work done here will help avoid an impact with one that would really do damage. This is the kind of science that ought to inspire kids to the subject.



I absolutely agree with every point you've made there. Inspiring kids to take up science would be a marvelous outcome.

Incidentally, my intent had no agenda at all when making this thread. It was merely to bring something I'd found interesting to the attention of ATS thinking that anyone interested would just read it. I wasn't expecting to enter into dialogue with anybody. I really should have known better!
edit on 7/10/11 by Insomniac because: to remove emoticon



posted on Oct, 8 2011 @ 02:05 PM
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here is a link to the actual article as published :
arxiv.org...



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