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Q&A for Willing Brits--For All Us In Countries Elsewhere....

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posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 12:17 PM
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This thread was instigated by my most horrible 6 week student abroad exchange in Liverpool in 6th grade. My parents thought it was a good idear to expose me to a different culture. In hindsight, I think I was too young? 11/12? Can't remember exactly....Lived w/a lovely family; the father was a Law Enforcement Officer...well, YNWA is still engrained....the food was bland...no offense, peeps, just a simple recount.

Here are my Questions for Answers (others put forwards as you see need/progression):

1) The only food I halfway liked (besides the ale, lol) was Shepherd's Pie (sp)--why is it called that--some kind of back or foreshadowoing?

2) Why do Pink Floyd (one of my fav. bands) say "Hanging on in quiet desperation is the English Way?"

3) Why does my car from the country say "Boot is open" instead of " Trunk is open"?

4) Why is a field called a "pitch"?

I could probably look some of this up on the search engines but would rather interact with my ancestors across the Atlantic, if thee are willing

edit on 6-10-2011 by BurningSpearess because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 12:26 PM
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edit on 6-10-2011 by truetrigger because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 12:26 PM
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reply to post by BurningSpearess
 


i use to be part british a couple of hundred years ago
does that count?



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 12:30 PM
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reply to post by truetrigger
 


frosh mistake--sooorrrryyy--should be up now


ps why is your avvy so creepy to me? (no offense)
edit on 6-10-2011 by BurningSpearess because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 12:36 PM
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We just call the trunk of a car a boot, no idea why, always been that way

Shepard Pie is so called as it is made from the animal that was once reared by Shepards.

A pitch is so called, i think im right, because hundreds of years ago when they set up a cricket match, they used to 'pitch the stumps' and it went on from there



This is all as I myself understand it

No idea about Pink Floyd though mate!



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 12:39 PM
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A Pitch is grass that sport is played on, a field is grass that is used for other things.
We call a "Trunk" a "Boot".
The pink floyd lyric is from Time - Dark side of the moon, an album about Syd Barrets decent into madness, nothing to do with England, even though its in the song, its just their idea of the Englishman in that time.
The shepherds pie is what the farmers wife used to make the farmer when he was busy herding their flock, typicaly anywho.

Hope that clears it up for you, any other questions give us a shout.



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 01:26 PM
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english seams to have been re-translated in america or so goes the common perspective, boots are trunks and paths are sidewalks, motorways are highways and "oy guvna this automobile's going somewhere" turned into "dude! this car is awesome!"

of course the above is a huge stereotype which is largely either irrelevant to modern times, I say dude more than the word automobile, or guvna...and I live in england. we both stole from greek lets leave it there xD

shepards pie, without looking at wiki, I assume is so named because you would have needed to be both a farmer and a shepard of sheep to aquire all the ingredients needed to make one, back in the day.

pink floyd seam to have touched on the inherent crazyness of the brit which was a counteract to the MAD scenario of the cold war. or maybe not, but explain how you can survive the thought of the world being destroyed at any given moment without going a little dr. strangelove xD (tweaked I think is the word im looking for.) I don't nor should I, speak for everyone, most just think "screw it, work, eat, sleep, yawn" and carry on their days as if absolutely nothing is wrong, floyd seam to be saying the above is an art form we've slowly mastered over the years, or like it says in hitchhikers guide, don't panic! in bold. good advice =)

I assume the fields in question are called a pitch because it has a set of goalposts, with the british obsession with football/soccer ... or maybe the cricket thing. we call the american version of football "rugby with helmets" =)

I can explain why our bland food tastes as such aswell but its not so true anymore since even though GMO's are banned outright they still advertise 30% less salt on everything but fail to tell you what E numbers stand for, chemical additives to be specific.

on a final note, ale is awesome but most however not all, is imported. next time your over you should check out the real homegrown cider business in england, that stuffs so tasty half the population of the counties involved have red noses as a side effect xD (not a joke.)

if you ever manage to make a return visit I highly suggest a roadtrip rather than going to liverpool again or something, there are ancient ruins all over the place in all of the UK that people don't notice half the time, a few years ago we found a tree growing on top of an old bakery, I wish I had pictures because it was surreal. and you can't beat our weather for consistancy xD



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 01:39 PM
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reply to post by Trolloks
 


Thanks for your response.


A Pitch is grass that sport is played on, a field is grass that is used for other things.


Makes sense to me. A field is a field is a field (or turf) over here in the US.

Gotta 'nother one for ya: Do you call outside ground the floor? My man spent more time abroad in the UK than I and he refers to any outside surface as the floor. I say it only implies indoors; he says outdoors--frustrating!



We call a "Trunk" a "Boot".


Yes, but why? My man refers to his football shoes as boots (UK as well?). I need to deny ignorance and give these stupid US mechanics a straight answer as to WHY it is called a boot....



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 01:45 PM
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Boot/trunk is just how our words differ, no reason as to why. Why does americans call it a trunk instead of a boot? Just one of those things.

We tend to use the term floor quite alot, as in the ground yes. We use the term outside in a different context, path, grass or general things you walk on is the floor, but outside is the general outdoors.



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 01:56 PM
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reply to post by ThorsBrother
 


I'd give ya 4 stars if I were able...

reply to post by Trolloks
 


reply to post by ThorsBrother
 


To Y'all (that's US Southern for you all):

Thanks for the responses; you did solve some of the mysteries I've encountered, but I am still curious about the reason "boot" is used, and of course, the "floor" for things outdoors...

This is a 2-way street; but I might almost predict that you could care less about American society as it is now. My interest lies in one of the lands of my fore-people, you see, and well, y'all are more established....

Hope the questions keep coming and we having willing respondents like you...


edit on 6-10-2011 by BurningSpearess because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 05:34 PM
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I have to take the UK car back to a US garage tomorrow for US repairs....

When the darnest light comes on to say "BOOT OPEN" how do I explain to these idiots that it only means the trunk?

I don't care where you're from @this point , I just want a witty response; I am tired of floundering....



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 07:13 PM
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Originally posted by BurningSpearess
I have to take the UK car back to a US garage tomorrow for US repairs....

When the darnest light comes on to say "BOOT OPEN" how do I explain to these idiots that it only means the trunk?

I don't care where you're from @this point , I just want a witty response; I am tired of floundering....


When the mechanic asks "whats the boot?".. Give him a sarcastic British reply and say "On the end of my leg and it'll be going up your arse if you don't get a move on sharpish!"


Seriously though, glad to have helped in some way but i really don't know where boot (car or shoe) come from. I'm guessing boot as in shoe came from boots that one would wear to work?



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 08:07 PM
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reply to post by ThorsBrother
 



When the mechanic asks "whats the boot?".. Give him a sarcastic British reply and say "On the end of my leg and it'll be going up your arse if you don't get a move on sharpish!"


I like this very much and in the mood I shall be in soon, I just might wear my boots! And the threat may become action?


Seriously, though, you might think mechanics are specialists and would be aware of such by now, sheesh.....
I'm told if I buy a newer model it will be from a country called India and perhaps they will upgrade the British computer system.....I think not....Maybe I'll find out; maybe not....I didn't have this many questions with a *German* car.....


Thanks again for your input---my poster across the Atlantic



edit on 6-10-2011 by BurningSpearess because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 09:32 PM
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Re the shepherds pie : if it was made with minced beef and potato it really should be called cottage pie (most people make it this way) Shepherds pie is made with minced lamb - hence the name (ie Sheep Herder).

I think the other poster is correct re the pitch it has to do with playing a sporting game football or cricket, ie you
pitch up - which means to set up - so maybe cricket stumps or football posts. We also use it when we pitch tents, ie set up the poles etc. Don't americans use it in baseball ? ie the pitcher (which we call rounders by the way - presumably because you go round the square (or diamond for you).

My first thought on the boot was that that was what was first stored in it - pre cars in the horse and carriage era, I remember seeing a big rectangular thing on the back that looked like a 'trunk' or a foot locker - hence boot - possibly !

Its a wonder that english is such a common language with all its foibles



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 11:02 AM
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reply to post by britchik
 



Re the shepherds pie : if it was made with minced beef and potato it really should be called cottage pie (most people make it this way) Shepherds pie is made with minced lamb - hence the name (ie Sheep Herder).


Maybe over the 20 years I have forgotten. I think that you are right that what was okay with me was Cottage pie, not Shepherds pie as I would have balked on the lamb. You know "mary had a little lamb"....I just never have able to eat lamb...



My first thought on the boot was that that was what was first stored in it - pre cars in the horse and carriage era, I remember seeing a big rectangular thing on the back that looked like a 'trunk' or a foot locker - hence boot - possibly !


Now *that* makes a lotta sense to me
surely you don't remember these events directly; maybe from photographs, film, or a past life...



Its a wonder that english is such a common language with all its foibles


I think the same...words like laboratory or aluminum, too. But I must say more of the other languages like Hebrew or Arabic have so many double/triple meanings and whatnot. I guess we are not doing too poorly...



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 04:47 PM
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New Q:

*If* the Queen ever dies, (not saying, hoping, wishing here) would the song/anthem, "God Save The Queen" actually be replaced with "God Save The Prince or King" if he becomes the official Head of state/Monarch???

edit on 7-10-2011 by BurningSpearess because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 08:20 PM
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Originally posted by BurningSpearess
New Q:

*If* the Queen ever dies, (not saying, hoping, wishing here) would the song/anthem, "God Save The Queen" actually be replaced with "God Save The Prince or King" if he becomes the official Head of state/Monarch???

edit on 7-10-2011 by BurningSpearess because: (no reason given)


It will change to the relevant title of the next Monarch.

So if the Queen was to die, and Prince Charles is the next in line it would change to "God Save The King".



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 08:43 PM
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reply to post by ThorsBrother
 



It will change to the relevant title of the next Monarch.
So if the Queen was to die, and Prince Charles is the next in line it would change to "God Save The King"


Allright, it's automatic?

No debate/vote in The Parliament or call from the Commoners.

By the way in Virginia, we are still called The Commonwealth, as an aside....



posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 08:40 AM
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reply to post by BurningSpearess
 


Sorry I have only just seen this so my reply is very late.

Yes the succession to the throne is automatic and is given to the first born child of the current monarch.

So when Queen Elizabeth dies/stands down, then her first born child, in this case Prince Charles will become King. And so on.



posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 09:12 AM
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The English term "boot" comes from the term on a pre-auto carriage, of a depressed area behind the main body of the coach, where people would often have to sit sideways. The term boot is actually used in some parts of rural America too, but not very widespread.

On American autos, there used to actually be trunks affixed on the outside of the early cars, in the rear, for luggage...but when the space became more internal and part of the car, the term simply stuck.




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