Skyview Telescope Images

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posted on Oct, 5 2011 @ 08:22 PM
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I'm posting this in Skunk Works, for obvious reasons - but if that's incorrect, mods, please move to the appropriate forum.

I came across this youtube channel on a thread on another forum (yes, that one). I'd like to know what this object actually is, since we have some very knowledgeable astro-types on here. Whatever it is, it's beautiful.





posted on Oct, 5 2011 @ 08:36 PM
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Bump in case Phage or Xcalibur are around and can tell me.
It's my new favorite space object, and I'd like to know its name. I love the shape the satellites make.



posted on Oct, 5 2011 @ 09:21 PM
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They provide only half of the coordinates (Right Ascension) to locate their object. Without the Declination the object cannot be verified.

The images look like they come from Google Sky or a similar program.

I'm calling bogus.



posted on Oct, 5 2011 @ 11:04 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
They provide only half of the coordinates (Right Ascension) to locate their object. Without the Declination the object cannot be verified.

The images look like they come from Google Sky or a similar program.

I'm calling bogus.



Thank you, Phage!



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 12:35 AM
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reply to post by CodyOutlaw
 


if it was taken through a telescope then it looks like jitter to me. wind causes jitter. telescopes do not track perfectly and amateur telescopes definitely do not. planets do not move like that, if they did they'd be ripped to shreds. if perturbed, it definitely would not move back.

besides, if it were truly perturbed it would be astronomical headlines.

so no, there was no perturbation, just telescope jitter.



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 11:55 AM
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Originally posted by redVFR750F
reply to post by CodyOutlaw
 


if it was taken through a telescope then it looks like jitter to me. wind causes jitter. telescopes do not track perfectly and amateur telescopes definitely do not. planets do not move like that, if they did they'd be ripped to shreds. if perturbed, it definitely would not move back.

besides, if it were truly perturbed it would be astronomical headlines.

so no, there was no perturbation, just telescope jitter.


Thanks! I was wondering about that, too



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 12:11 PM
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reply to post by redVFR750F
 


I would go as far to say as it's more like careful editing to pertain a sense of what they are trying to explain. I would also go as far to say that they are not astronomers either.
Their other videos are not great either.



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 04:00 PM
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Originally posted by Phage


The images look like they come from Google Sky or a similar program.

I'm calling bogus.



Similar program.
skyview.gsfc.nasa.gov...



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 07:59 PM
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Yep, I wasn't really getting an astronomers vibe from them, either.


Does anyone know the name of that space object, though?
Is it an actual space object?
It really is awesome-looking, real or fake.



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 08:29 PM
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reply to post by CodyOutlaw
 

You mean the red dot?
There are a lot of red dots in the sky. But without a proper set of coordinates I can't identify that one.



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 04:26 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 



Good point



posted on Oct, 17 2011 @ 01:00 PM
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Some more info about these guys. They're hoaxers alright and they're not above stealing real amateurs' images.

Little did they know that the positions of the planets relative to the stars not only gives away where the image was taken in the sky (not at all where they said it was), but also when it was taken. With a little astrometry I was able to not only figure that out, but using that information I traced it back to its true owner.



posted on Oct, 17 2011 @ 01:04 PM
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reply to post by ngchunter
 


Awesome work, thank you!
Maybe the mods can move this to the hoax bin now?
Stealing other people's work is real low.



posted on Oct, 17 2011 @ 11:21 PM
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reply to post by CodyOutlaw
 


Thanks! I guess they saw the debunking and the heat was too much; Skyview pulled all of their videos off their youtube channel today.
www.youtube.com...
They still have a few favorites on their channel, but no uploads.



posted on Oct, 21 2011 @ 12:05 PM
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reply to post by ngchunter
 


You did such great work, I was hoping it would stick!

But it looks like they're back today with another upload - looks like the same pics? Maybe you should have a look to see where they stole it from, if it's even legit? They've posted a spiel about copyrighting their stuff now, too.



posted on Oct, 24 2011 @ 09:12 AM
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Originally posted by CodyOutlaw
reply to post by ngchunter
 


You did such great work, I was hoping it would stick!

But it looks like they're back today with another upload - looks like the same pics? Maybe you should have a look to see where they stole it from, if it's even legit? They've posted a spiel about copyrighting their stuff now, too.


Some of it looks like it was just faked outright and the rest looks like it was stolen straight off of NSN, a site dedicated to astronomy broadcasts using deep space video cameras attached to telescopes. On their last pre-takedown video I also caught them stealing from the "Smiling Chicken observatory," a private amateur who does just that kind of video astronomy. Their latest video crops single stars (particularly that bright red one) so tightly that there's no contextual information to identify the star field; they're doing everything they can to cover their tracks. They have some real nerve to blatantly claim copyright of stolen material. Unfortuntely NSN doesn't record broadcasts, so there's no way to trace it back unless the broadcaster or someone else records the images themselves and posts it to the video image gallery which is where I found the image they stole from the Smiling Chicken.
edit on 24-10-2011 by ngchunter because: (no reason given)





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