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CNN Admits There Is A Massive Brown Dwarf Star Hurling Toward Earth

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posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 02:39 AM
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its large gravitational effects cause the rotation of earth to momentarily stop,


From 1000mph to 0mph momentarily? That means a lot of broken buildings and people splattered against walls, even those in underground bunkers

edit on 6-10-2011 by markymint because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 02:43 AM
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reply to post by kwell
 


I believe there is a planet behind our sun. I made a YouTube video of pictures of something behind the sun. I just can't post it yet until I do the 20 post.



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 03:41 AM
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reply to post by sphinx551
 


If it destroys the earth by October 11th, then all of my procrastination in college will have finally payed off.



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 04:04 AM
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reply to post by kwell
 


I believe this is the article that the video is talking about.

www.independent.co.uk...



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 05:49 AM
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Ok so that should be it right? No more stragglers ? Everyone on the planet, should know by now, that people who
don't know anything about astronomy. Aren't going to find anything on google sky or stellarium, or in the media.
That people who do know what's up aren't already going to be on top of.

If you take a picture of the sun. don't post it on ATS.

That vid has been getting passed around for months. I should know. Best I can come up with is, fear mongering, on the part of the media.

People seem to get on google sky. Suddenly their astronmoners.

No big deal tho OP. Just laugh it off. Works for me.

edit on 6-10-2011 by randyvs because: (no reason given)

edit on 6-10-2011 by randyvs because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 05:54 AM
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Goodness me. The universe is such a vast place. Why is everything targeted on one small blue/green planet? God must really hate us.



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 07:08 AM
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reply to post by Fight4YourSoul
 


If there were a planet behind the Sun it could not last in that position for any length of time since the Earth is moving. No planet sized object could be within 70AU without a measurable effect on the positions of the known planets.



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 07:14 AM
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reply to post by rreeves5
 


Why not go to the original journal article.
Persistent Evidence of a Jovian Mass Solar Companion in the Oort Cloud

A Bayesian statistical analysis suggests that the probability of the companion hypothesis is comparable to or greater than the probability of the null hypothesis of a statistical fluke. Such a companion could also have produced the detached Kuiper Belt object Sedna. The putative companion could be easily detected by the recently launched Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE).


The chances are so-so and so far no one on the WISE team has reported this "easily detected" object.

There may be a small object out there. It won't be a brown dwarf. The article suggests it is 1 to 4 jovian masses, which at most is 1/3 the mass of a brown dwarf.



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 07:19 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 
Well it seems to be a fact,
This is the first known images



edit on 6-10-2011 by TWILITE22 because: (no reason given)

edit on 6-10-2011 by TWILITE22 because: (no reason given)



The planet is thought to be one to two times as massive as Jupiter, according to the scientists who imaged it. It orbits a star similar to a young version of our Sun. The star, GQ Lupi, has been observed by a team of European astronomers since 1999. They have made three images using the Very Large Telescope (VLT) of the European Southern Observatory (ESO) in Chile. The Hubble Space Telescope and the Japanese Subaru Telescope each contributed an image, too. The work was led by Ralph Neuhaeuser of the Astrophysical Institute & University Observatory (AIU). "The detection of the faint object near the bright star is certain," Neuhaeuser told SPACE.com on Friday. The system is young, so the planet is rather warm, like a bun fresh out of the oven. That warmth made it comparatively easier to see in the glare of its host star compared with more mature planets. Also, the planet is very far from the star -- about 100 times the distance between Earth and the Sun, another factor in helping to separate the light between the two objects.

edit on 6-10-2011 by TWILITE22 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 07:52 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
Nope.

CNN just talked about the theory that there may be a massive object in the outer reaches of the solar system. The theory has been around for a while but so far there isn't a lot of evidence. A couple of guys hope there will be some soon.

Astrophysicists John Matese and Daniel Whitmire from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette think data from NASA's infrared space telescope WISE will confirm Tyche's existence and location within two years.


No "admitting". Nothing about it "hurling" toward Earth.
news.blogs.cnn.com...

edit on 10/5/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)


Nope.

NASA reported the discovery of hundreds of brown dwarf stars at NEOWISE conference and one of the scientists did imply the existence of Planet X aka NIBIRU. It wasn't openly admitted but she was so uncomfy with the question, that it was clearly implied that "might there be something in the outer system with a very elongated orbit", that fits in the myth of NIBIRU.



edit on 10/6/2011 by 1AnunnakiBastard because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 08:03 AM
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reply to post by sphinx551
 


I really doubt that a brown dwarf star 4x the size of Jupiter, could pass through the inner system without being noticed by astronomers. And the usual "only-IR-telescopes-would-detect-it" is BS, because it would be visible by naked eye, by reflecting sun light and surely it would severely disrupt the orbit of the inner planets. If such object is passing through the inner system, how come nor a single amateur astronomer of the entire planet, has noticed it yet?



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 08:55 AM
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Originally posted by Fight4YourSoul
reply to post by kwell
 


I believe there is a planet behind our sun. I made a YouTube video of pictures of something behind the sun. I just can't post it yet until I do the 20 post.


Well guess where we'll be in 6months? Directly"behind" our sun (from where we are today)So we would see something. Or we could've seen something 6 months ago.
At some point ;Y'all gotta let this one go..
(Waits patiently for first "disinfo/shill expletives to arrive...)

1 AU (astronomical unit) is the distance from earth to the sun or 93 million miles.
25,000 Au mentioned in the O.P. is "Way-hey-hey" out there)

Choose your own poison but you have much more chance of being crushed under the weightof the collapsing economy thany any mythological planetary disaster.

edit on 6-10-2011 by 46ACE because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 08:56 AM
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reply to post by 1AnunnakiBastard
 





If such object is passing through the inner system, how come nor a single amateur astronomer of the entire planet, has noticed it yet?


that question is easily answered, in fact, it doesn't even need to be asked, when you are batcrap crazy with basically no science schooling other than you need oxygen to breath or you die (which is debatable for some)

The fact that this BS thread went 4 pages in, and people are still saying "oh wow, CNN said it, it must be true"

Think about this.

CNN didn't say that, not even close, so anyone saying that didn't read the article the OP is talking about. Oh, ok, fine, but then it's explained I believe 4 posts in.

So, you guys come into a thread, don't read the OP, don't read any of the posts even on the first page, them comment?

You are commenting on the thread title alone?





posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 11:29 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


That is NOT CW Leonis, I called a local planetarium and they definitely confirmed that. So stop spreading that bull#. They said they were not sure what that object is but is NOT CW Leonis. You fail. Nice try dude.


Also, how do you ignore increasing (massively too by the way) earth changes that would be caused by a passing celestial object, just like have been seeing the past few years : HUGE quakes, Tsunamis, record heat waves, floods, tornadoes, government prepping like crazy for "something big", near earth satelites now classified, bunkers being built, seed vaults, sinkholes, massive increases in metreorites, it goes on and on.

What will it take for someone like you to wake up? Nothing will, we know your type.



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 11:35 AM
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Originally posted by DrumminDude
reply to post by Phage
 


That is NOT CW Leonis, I called a local planetarium and they definitely confirmed that. So stop spreading that bull#. They said they were not sure what that object is but is NOT CW Leonis. You fail. Nice try dude.


Also, how do you ignore increasing (massively too by the way) earth changes that would be caused by a passing celestial object, just like have been seeing the past few years : HUGE quakes, Tsunamis, record heat waves, floods, tornadoes, government prepping like crazy for "something big", near earth satelites now classified, bunkers being built, seed vaults, sinkholes, massive increases in metreorites, it goes on and on.

What will it take for someone like you to wake up? Nothing will, we know your type.


Yes I am getting tired of his disinfo too and derailing of threads.



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 11:41 AM
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reply to post by kwell
 


I know Kwell, I just made simple call to our local planetarium and had my answer within 2 minutes.

Also, I asked the employees there what they thought it was or what it could be. A brown dwarf would make sense they said given most solar systems are binary and that it could be we are just finding our twin now. It happens all the time at NASA, JAXA and ESA they said. Those are the most common star out there, brown dwarfs. WISE found tons of them they also said and that object at those coordinates is most likely a BD.

I think what it is with the deniers is that they are scarred. Plain and simple. No one can ignore what is going on politically and geologically. It is getting real close folks. If not prepared, you better get on it quick.



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 11:46 AM
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reply to post by DrumminDude
 



I called a local planetarium ....


Do you mean, you phoned them? How did you, via a mere telephone call, ascertain that you and they were talking about the same thing?

Oh, and we have only your interpretation of what you think they told you, on that call. To do this properly with oyur local planetarium, you must go down there in person, and show someone face-to-face what you're talking about, and have them point it out to you. Think of it as a learning experience.


Before that, though....you may wish to download, and study a program called "Stellarium". In case you fear embarrassment, at the planetarium. Though, I expect they'd be kind, and happy to help, and wouldn't make fun.

www.stellarium.org...



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 11:50 AM
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reply to post by DrumminDude
 

Yes, it is CW Leonis Here is the source image from IRAS.
irsa.ipac.caltech.edu...
edit on 10/6/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 11:52 AM
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reply to post by DrumminDude
 


They must be the most inept astronomers ever then. For one, if it's not CW Leonis why is it in the exact position of CW Leonis and why does its IRAS designation number correspond with CW Leonis. Second, binary star systems are not the most common systems. Especially for our galaxy. Not to mention that even if our Sun had a companion it would be very very unlikely for it to be a brown dwarf. Yellow dwarfs tend to have other yellow dwarfs as companions. Finally the most glaring error, the claim that brown dwarfs are the most numerous stars in the universe. The most numerous stars are red dwarfs and they tend to be part of solitary systems. So are you sure you actually called a planetarium or did you lie about that and actually got all of your information from Lucus' site?



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 11:54 AM
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reply to post by DrumminDude
 

Most "solar systems" are not binary.


In this Letter I compare recent findings suggesting a low binary star fraction for late-type stars with knowledge concerning the forms of the stellar initial and present-day mass functions for masses down to the hydrogen-burning limit. This comparison indicates that most stellar systems formed in the Galaxy are likely single and not binary, as has been often asserted. Indeed, in the current epoch two-thirds of all main-sequence stellar systems in the Galactic disk are composed of single stars. Some implications of this realization for understanding the star and planet formation process are briefly mentioned.

iopscience.iop.org...

It actually seems that the odds are not that good that the Sun has a stellar companion. In our "neighborhood" only 33% of the sun-like stars are binary and the majority of those systems consist of stars of similar types (sun-like stars have sun-like companions). Recent studies show that the odds go down, way down, when considering a brown dwarf as a binary companion. Brown dwarfs tend to have brown dwarfs for companions, sun-like stars have sun-like stars.
www.deepfly.org...



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