CNN Admits There Is A Massive Brown Dwarf Star Hurling Toward Earth

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posted on Oct, 5 2011 @ 08:46 PM
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Have the google sky images been debunked, anyone? What's the deal?




posted on Oct, 5 2011 @ 08:46 PM
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reply to post by DavidsHope
 


Here is a link to cnn... news.blogs.cnn.com...



posted on Oct, 5 2011 @ 08:47 PM
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reply to post by kwell
 


That's the actual peer-reviewed article that the CNN video is based on. You could probably get by just reading the intro and conclusion to get an idea of what Matese & Whitmire were actually saying.



posted on Oct, 5 2011 @ 08:49 PM
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reply to post by Gridrebel
 

NASA didn't block anything out. You can thank Google for that. In any case here is the source image. It's from IRAS which, as everyone knows, completed it's full sky survey in 1983. Yes, the image is 28 years old and it's clear that there is a lot of image "noise".

edit on 10/5/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 5 2011 @ 08:50 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by kwell
 

The thing you are seeing in Leo is a star called CW Leonis.
The thing you are seeing to the left of Mercury is another star.


CNN said that because they are idiots when it comes to anything having to do with science.

edit on 10/5/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)


Haha! Thank you for teaching facts on these threads. I can't even believe I clicked on this thread....
Nibiru



posted on Oct, 5 2011 @ 08:54 PM
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Really? Why is this being rehashed again? Ovtober 11th we apparently bite the bullet. Don't you all have he ability to come up with better doomsday theories yet?



posted on Oct, 5 2011 @ 08:55 PM
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Virtual telescopes such as Google Sky, World Wide Telescope and Wiki Sky have allowed people to explore the sky in great detail at many different wavelengths. However, if you are not familiar with the sky some things may be of great puzzlement; especially the difference in view between the infrared sky views and the visual data. First off you should know something about the images. All the programs use the same databases, for example the Palomar Deep Sky Survey for visual data, and the IRAS survey for infrared images. There are (very) minor discrepancies in the location and appearance of objects between the three programs due to they way the images are digitized/compressed and stitched together, but they are using exactly same images. Another thing to remember is that the DSS plates date from 1956-1958 (yes, that's right), and the IRAS images date from 1983. So they reflect the sky situation decades ago. Nonetheless, the sky revealed by these images can be quite astounding.
source



posted on Oct, 5 2011 @ 08:58 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


I was just about this post this. I guess I can at least contribute its designation from the IRAS data. This is IRAS 13459-0812.



posted on Oct, 5 2011 @ 08:59 PM
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Originally posted by kwell

Originally posted by DavidsHope
Hi: According to the link you posted CNN had several articles dating back to 1999. the most recent I could find was dated April 15, 2005 which to me doesn't seem like breaking news. Read some of this a long time ago on CNN so my question is, What relevant new article has CNN posted lately? Has my browser refused to load something? Which by the way does happen from time to time.
DH


I only posted those older articles to show you they have known about it since 1999. Did you look at the first article that is the recent one.


They haven't known about it since 1999--they've been looking for it since 1999.
Read the CNN article that Phage linked to--it says:

Astrophysicists John Matese and Daniel Whitmire from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette think data from NASA's infrared space telescope WISE will confirm Tyche's existence and location within two years.

Matese and Whitmire (the two fellas mentioned in CNN) have been chasing this for years
Here’s the story from 2002
www.telegraph.co.uk...
and their paper from 1999
www.ucs.louisiana.edu...

So far, it hasn't been found.



posted on Oct, 5 2011 @ 09:00 PM
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reply to post by Xcalibur254
 


I found an article on wikipedia about CW Leonis... en.wikipedia.org... It really doesn't make me feel much better but it does say it is very far away. Also, how do we know what see on google sky is in fact that? That would make more sense to me because it can be seen in infrared. Does anyone know how to figure out through the coordinates how close that thing on google sky is to the earth?
edit on 5-10-2011 by kwell because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 5 2011 @ 09:01 PM
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Originally posted by kwell
reply to post by Xcalibur254
 


Does anyone know how to figure out through the coordinates how close that thing on google sky is to the earth?

You can't.
According to the wikipedia article you linked it's 390–490 light years away. Not much to worry about from a very old and fading star.



posted on Oct, 5 2011 @ 09:02 PM
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reply to post by kwell
 

Thank you: Got it. I app. you taking your time.
DH



posted on Oct, 5 2011 @ 09:02 PM
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reply to post by kwell
 
do you really believe this garb?
or do you post it for the stars?




posted on Oct, 5 2011 @ 09:05 PM
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Originally posted by Phage

Originally posted by kwell
reply to post by Xcalibur254
 


Does anyone know how to figure out through the coordinates how close that thing on google sky is to the earth?

You can't.
According to the wikipedia article you linked it's 390–490 light years away. Not much to worry about from a very old and fading star.


Exactly that is why what is on google sky couldn't possibly be it because I saw that it is somewhat close to the comet elenin which is not that far away. It is not that far away. I am not buying any of these explainations no offense intended. But what is that thing? It is not CW Leonis and it is not an ordinary star.



posted on Oct, 5 2011 @ 09:06 PM
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This is indeed most interesting: CNN hmm. very interesting. I am going to take a look at the links you provided to Mateses' work. thanks
DH



posted on Oct, 5 2011 @ 09:13 PM
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Originally posted by kwell

But what is that thing? It is not CW Leonis and it is not an ordinary star.


How do you know it's not CW Leonis?
herschel.cf.ac.uk...



posted on Oct, 5 2011 @ 09:16 PM
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reply to post by kwell
 


So in the video it says it is "lurking at the edge of the solar system"

How does that turn into "hurling towards earth"?

Your title is misleading the the whole story is bunkum. Anything that massive would have massive effects on the entire solar system if it were to enter into it. If lurking at the edge is what it is doing, it has always and will continue to do that. If it is racing towards the Earth it would have huge gravitaional effects on every other planet in the solar system.

These stories - even if they are from MSM - (Especially?) are stupid.


ETA - I am sure ATS is now being used as a training ground for tabloid jurnalists.

edit on 5-10-2011 by Shamatt because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 5 2011 @ 09:17 PM
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Originally posted by Pauligirl

Originally posted by kwell

But what is that thing? It is not CW Leonis and it is not an ordinary star.


How do you know it's not CW Leonis?
herschel.cf.ac.uk...



Because they say CW Leonis is very far away. This is close to elenin which we know is coming very close to earth on October 17. Its too close to be CW Leonis.
edit on 5-10-2011 by kwell because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 5 2011 @ 09:21 PM
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Originally posted by kwell

Originally posted by Pauligirl

Originally posted by kwell

But what is that thing? It is not CW Leonis and it is not an ordinary star.


How do you know it's not CW Leonis?
herschel.cf.ac.uk...



Because they say CW Leonis is very far away. This is close to elenin which we know is coming very close to earth on September 17. Its too close to be CW Leonis.


What makes you think they are close together--are you looking at a picture?



posted on Oct, 5 2011 @ 09:24 PM
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reply to post by kwell
 


I think you're confounding two different things here. CW Leonis is one of the many stars that make up the constellation Leo. When Elenin was visible it appeared to pass through the Leo constellation. This doesn't mean it was part of the Leo constellation, just that from the perspective of Earth that's the area of the sky it was in. In truth, Elenin was nowhere near CW Leonis. In fact they were about 390-490 LY apart.





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