I want to make movies. Who knows about cameras?

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posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 02:38 PM
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I know next to zero about cameras.

This is what I think I need. Correct me if I'm wrong.

something that has depth of field

that does 24 frames per second

that uses memory cards and not video tapes


dang, i forgot the rest. Anyway, I want the best camera for movie-making that can be bought for under £1000.

Help please.




posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 02:55 PM
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reply to post by wigit
 


This link has some decent comparisons for HD camcorders:

Camcorder Comparison

This link has some good info on the POV type cameras:

Go Pro review

I have the GoPro, and it is a very nice unit for POV action videos.

A professional quality HD camera will cost more than your stated budget, but you then have to ask yourself, do you have the computational power to edit video of that level of quality.

Honestly, IMO anything @ 960p w/ 30 FPS will be just fine for most amatuer videos.
edit on 4-10-2011 by sixswornsermon because: sp



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 03:03 PM
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reply to post by sixswornsermon
 


Thanks for the links. I'll have a good read through.

What's the difference between HD and POV types? And what's computational power?



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 03:05 PM
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reply to post by wigit
 


The best camera for low budget film making is the Canon Eos 5D Mark II.
edit on 4-10-2011 by rocket88 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 03:12 PM
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reply to post by wigit
 


Well, they are all HD (HD = High Definition = higher resolution). POV denotes Point Of View, where there are usually no options to zoom, and are intended to portray a first person viewpoint with a wide field of vision. These are made for motorsports, actionsports etc...

By computational power, I am relating to the fact that HD formats create large filesizes, that require a computer with both large storage capacity, and high computational power to edit the video in an efficient manner. With this in mind, a computer that has > 1 terabyte of hard drive space, and greater than or equal to 3.5 gigabytes of ram, with a modern dual core processor, will do just fine for most people's needs.
edit on 4-10-2011 by sixswornsermon because: sp



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 03:14 PM
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reply to post by wigit
 


I do some contract work for a independent production house. Lately they have been playing around with using Canon DSLRs for video shoots.

Here is a sample vid I found on Youtube for the Canon EOS 7D. (this is what I've seen used)


I think though, if you can make it work with your budget, the Canon 5D is the one that is preferred for video shoots. It was used last year to film an episode of House (pretty cool, I think!).

In another example of ‘cross-over’ media acquisition products, Canon announced last week that the season finale of Fox’ ‘House’ (airs Monday, May 17) was shot in its entirety with a Canon EOS 5D Mark II.

You read that right! Canon’s high-end DSLRs have been able to shoot video for some time now. Cinematographers have been experimenting with this feature for a couple of years, and have recently been pushing the limits by shooting portions of TV shows, such as the opening for this season of ‘Saturday Night Live.’ www.hdtvmagazine.com...


Video shot with the Canon 5D:


Lots of resources on the internet for shooting with the Canons

Can you tell me what the end use of the footage will be used for? I can ask around for suggestions in your price range and need.

OiO
edit on 4-10-2011 by OneisOne because: add video for Canon 5D



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 03:41 PM
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reply to post by OneisOne
 


Hopefully the end product will be an original movie. However, till I get used to all that is new to me I plan to make what I hope will be "very pretty" swedes, or parodies. I enjoy the editing part, and when I learn the camera stuff I think I'll be good at that too. I want the movie look, not documentary.

I'm in no rush but £1000 is a lot of money to spend where I come from, that's why I'm doing my homwwork now. I don't want to make any hasty purchases that I'll regret.



posted on Oct, 5 2011 @ 10:38 AM
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Originally posted by wigit
I'm in no rush but £1000 is a lot of money to spend where I come from, that's why I'm doing my homwwork now. I don't want to make any hasty purchases that I'll regret.


That is alot of money to me too!

Looking at your goals for a finished product, here are some things to consider:

What is the audio setup for the camera? Can the camera handle an external mic or will the audio that the camera records internally be good enough for your finished product?

Do research on the different image sensors, then use that to consider what types of lighting you think you will be working with.

Consider all cameras in your price range, even if the camera takes tape (miniDV). Honestly, once you get your project finished, no one can tell if it was originally recorded on a SD card or miniDV.

sixswornsermon earlier in the thread had a link to cnet. There's some good information there. They also have a "buying guide" that has good info. cnet camcorder buying guide

Hope that helps some!
OiO



posted on Oct, 5 2011 @ 01:36 PM
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Whaa should be able to help too, he makes indy movies and works in Hollywood productions in various roles.

2nd



posted on Oct, 5 2011 @ 05:21 PM
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Cameras please



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 02:15 AM
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Originally posted by curious7
Whaa should be able to help too, he makes indy movies and works in Hollywood productions in various roles.

2nd



Thanks for the plug c7!

My small production company uses a DSLR Canon 60D for it's main camera but we also use a Panasonic AG-HMC45 as well as a Canon HF10 and a couple of Flip cameras.

But beside a good camera don't neglect sound. The audience will forgive crappy video but not bad sound.

We use the current workhorse in the indy world, the Zoom H4n field recorder along with a couple of wireless lavs.

But to make films all the fancy gear in the world won't make a bit of difference if you don't have a good story.

I have seen fantastic films made with camcorders costing only a few hundred usd. or even cellphone cameras.

Just start with what you can afford but START.

I also find this free program an invaluable asset in preproduction.

celtx.com...

Welcome....Make your film..........we want to see it!!

edit on 7-10-2011 by whaaa because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 03:50 AM
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reply to post by whaaa
 


Thanks for taking time to reply and thanks for celtx link. Downloading now .

I'm getting excited, I think I'll go for DSLR over camcorder. I've watched lots of footage and the images are stunning.

I've already said I'm in no hurry cos I'm doing my homework first and I am a TOTAL rookie. I'll let you in on a secret - I don't own and can't even operate a mobile phone
I'm not totally stupid, just not interested, but when I do get interested in something I go all the way to find out about it.

I've been comparing the Canon 60d, the 550, and the 5d mkII. I'll end up going with what I can afford. What I've read so far is there's not a lot of filming time with one of these cameras as opposed to a camcorder, I suppose that can be helped by buying extra batteries and extra memory?

Also lenses, there are dozens, what types should I look for and are there any must-haves?

Your sound equipment - can you explain what a wireless lav is please? Is wireless stuff better than an external mic with a long, long lead?

TYVM
Wigit



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 11:35 AM
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Originally posted by wigit
reply to post by whaaa


I've been comparing the Canon 60d, the 550, and the 5d mkII. I'll end up going with what I can afford. What I've read so far is there's not a lot of filming time with one of these cameras as opposed to a camcorder, I suppose that can be helped by buying extra batteries and extra memory?

Also lenses, there are dozens, what types should I look for and are there any must-haves?

Your sound equipment - can you explain what a wireless lav is please? Is wireless stuff better than an external mic with a long, long lead?

TYVM
Wigit



You are correct that DSLRs have a short filming duration. Video heats up the sensor and they need to cool down after about 12 min. of filming but they can be turned back on after a short cool down time; it's not really a battery/memory card issue but always have plenty of SDHC class 8 cards and extra batteries.

You can go crazy with lenses but we only use 2. A 18-135 zoom [comes with the 60D] and a 50mm 1.8 for that narrow depth of field film look. I think these are essential.

Most of the time for sound we use a boom pole attached to a shotgun mic. run directly into the camera. But some times that isn't practical and you need to mic. up the actors with a wireless lav. www.bhphotovideo.com...

As cool as all the gear and physical act of shooting is........
The real art of film making takes place in writing the script/preproduction and at the editing suite. We use Final Cut pro but there are many good editing systems out there. This is not to discount the value of quality cast and crew but a good director can work miracles !!



Film making is now available to almost everyone that wants to make one due to advent of the digital age and streaming video has changed the distribution model so that millions can see your work.


Best of Luck......tell your story!

edit...I forgot to add that networking with other people interested in filmmaking can overcome a lot of obstacles.
Join a friends of film group; learn and help each other to realize your dreams.




edit on 7-10-2011 by whaaa because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 10 2012 @ 07:55 AM
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Well I did it. I spent all my dosh on a 60d. Not here yet so I'm chomping at the bit to get my hands on it.

Does anyone else do dslr movie-making? Sad to see whaa has left us, he was going to be bombarded with questions as soon as my camera was unboxed.





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