It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Unprecedented Arctic Ozone Loss Occurred Last Winter

page: 2
4
<< 1   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Oct, 3 2011 @ 04:50 PM
link   

Originally posted by MasterGemini
The temps are not lower as in more cold, they were colder longer . . . hence unusually frigid.

If the the area was following historically established patterns this would not have happened.



No, I'm not kidding. Since you like quoting definitions:

frig·id (frjd)
adj.
1. Extremely cold. See Synonyms at cold.

www.thefreedictionary.com...

It was not unusually cold. It was not unusually frigid.
edit on 10/3/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 3 2011 @ 04:52 PM
link   
Similarities between Chlorine and Fluorine:

Both in group VII of periodic table.
Both have seven outer electrons, so both readily form X- ions.
Both reactive gases.
Both toxic and corrosive.


Back to the wiki on Xenon and the importance of chlorine:


After Neil Bartlett's discovery in 1962 that xenon can form chemical compounds, a large number of xenon compounds have been discovered and described. Almost all known xenon compounds contain the electronegative atoms fluorine or oxygen.



Three fluorides are known: XeF2, XeF4, and XeF6. The fluorides are the starting point for the synthesis of almost all xenon compounds. The solid, crystalline difluoride XeF2 is formed when a mixture of fluorine and xenon gases is exposed to ultraviolet light.[80] Ordinary daylight is sufficient.[81] Long-term heating of XeF2 at high temperatures under an NiF2 catalyst yields XeF6.[82]



posted on Oct, 3 2011 @ 04:53 PM
link   

Originally posted by Phage

Originally posted by MasterGemini
The temps are not lower as in more cold, they were colder longer . . . hence unusually frigid.

If the the area was following historically established patterns this would not have happened.



No, I'm not kidding. Since you like quoting definitions:

frig·id (frjd)
adj.
1. Extremely cold. See Synonyms at cold.

www.thefreedictionary.com...

It was not unusually cold. It was not unusually frigid.
edit on 10/3/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)


Right so now it wasn't even cold. (
)

Got it.

Are you done?
edit on 3-10-2011 by MasterGemini because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 3 2011 @ 04:57 PM
link   
reply to post by MasterGemini
 


It was "cold" but in a way we aren't really used to.

The nuclear winter kind of cold.


Interesting how this "winter" started in March, Spring time, and will not end for decades to centuries.

All kinds of weird stuff is going to happen that we don't expect, and this ozone depletion issue could just be the tip of the proverbial iceberg. Keep your eyes peeled.

Oh and lets try to figure out the science behind this so we can focus and make it viral.



posted on Oct, 3 2011 @ 04:58 PM
link   
reply to post by MasterGemini
 

I didn't say it wasn't cold. It must be very cold for the chlorine reactions to occur.
What I said was it was no colder than usual for winter. What I said was it was not "unusually frigid".



posted on Oct, 3 2011 @ 05:03 PM
link   

Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by MasterGemini
 

I didn't say it wasn't cold. It must be very cold for the chlorine reactions to occur.
What I said was it was no colder than usual for winter. What I said was it was not "unusually frigid".



But fluoride and xenon can react in ordinary sunlight to form XeF2.

And as pointed out chlorine is very similar to fluoride, chemically speaking.

Why are they not looking into all of these types of possibilities?

Are people forgetting that Fukushima released any types of particles such as xenon into the upper atmosphere? It's pretty well documented at this point with credible sources.



posted on Oct, 3 2011 @ 05:15 PM
link   
Ah, found it!
It was the Crab Nebula, my bad.
The two simultaneous articles were thus:
First is from May 5th, 2011

Mystery Cosmic Rays Zapping South Pole -- "From the Neutron Star of the Vela Supernova?"

Second is from May 11, 2011

Crab Nebula's gamma-ray flare mystifies astronomers

We've got regular pulses slamming into our little planet and they appear to be doing quite a bit of damage.
Perhaps we should be looking in that direction as to why our ozone is missing huge chunks? The word 'seige' springs to mind.

More on the Crab Nebula

Gamma-ray flares from the Crab Nebula

Crab Nebula Spews Most Powerful Flares Yet

Now, if only I could remember the name of the author concerning the large balloons of water being sent from space into our atmosphere.... I'm sure there was also IR footage of it. It's something that happens multiple times daily.... But this was from several years back. Anyone?
Looks like there are two sides....

The Arctic hole started this all off (even before the may Antarctic stuff) in late March, 2011. It states March 30-31st but it's October and we still haven't seen a cloud, just a blinding blue sky and a sun which pierces the retina into the brain. Scandinavia and Eastern Europe...



If the youtube thing doesn't work, watch it here - Ozone Hole up to 70% below normal, heading for Europe

I'm personally hoping this thread doesn't get engulfed in the thousands of pointless Occupy threads.



posted on Oct, 3 2011 @ 05:16 PM
link   
reply to post by muzzleflash
 

Ok, let's start with two important pieces of the science.

1) What catalytic reaction is possible with O3 and xenon compounds?

2) If it is not a catalytic reaction, what quantities of xenon compounds would be required to result in the the O3 loses observed?



posted on Oct, 3 2011 @ 05:31 PM
link   

Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by muzzleflash
 

Ok, let's start with two important pieces of the science.

1) What catalytic reaction is possible with O3 and xenon compounds?

2) If it is not a catalytic reaction, what quantities of xenon compounds would be required to result in the the O3 loses observed?




I do not know if it is one type of reaction or a combination of them which lead to this end result, but it could be from oxidation alone or if there could be precursor reactions earlier on to prevent the o2 from creating enough o3.

Is there less overall O2 content in the air where the lower O3 content is measured?

There is like 5000 possibilities here.



posted on Oct, 3 2011 @ 05:44 PM
link   
reply to post by muzzleflash
 

I don't know how many possibilities there are but the Fukushima disaster seems an unlikely one.
From March 14, 2011.

"Our measurements show that at the relevant altitudes about half of the ozone that was present above the Arctic has been destroyed over the past weeks," says AWI researcher Markus Rex, describing the current situation.

www.sciencedaily.com...



posted on Oct, 3 2011 @ 05:57 PM
link   

Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by muzzleflash
 

I don't know how many possibilities there are but the Fukushima disaster seems an unlikely one.
From March 14, 2011.

"Our measurements show that at the relevant altitudes about half of the ozone that was present above the Arctic has been destroyed over the past weeks," says AWI researcher Markus Rex, describing the current situation.

www.sciencedaily.com...


Sorry, the other articles had dates from April. I thought it was recent news during that month.
I apologize. If it was weeks before Fukushima happened, than it's initial causation would have to be separate. Maybe the cosmic radiation theory is better in that case.

Unless....in the event that the source was doctored to preempt the revelation on March 14th, 3 days after the disaster.
Hey it's ATS after all.

I admit that's rather unlikely however, and the odds are low they would actually think about this ahead of time. Especially since no one really cares if it did or didn't anyway...

So what do you think about the cosmic 'hot spots' theory? Do you think this and other magnetic field issues could be behind this?



posted on Oct, 3 2011 @ 06:10 PM
link   
reply to post by muzzleflash
 

The cosmic ray theory is interesting but it doesn't let CFCs of the hook, it just offers another mechanism for how they do the damage. The polar stratospheric clouds are still the culprit.

Lu, however, believes that cosmic rays break up the CFCs. He says that when cosmic rays ionize atmospheric molecules the liberated electrons can be stored on the surface of the ice particles and that these electrons, rather than the sunlight, break up the CFCs and convert the fragments into molecular chlorine.

physicsworld.com...



posted on Oct, 3 2011 @ 06:14 PM
link   
Why isn't this being questioned as a potential source of the problem:




Over the past two years, a similar pattern has been seen over the northern skies by the Milagro observatory in Los Alamos, New Mexico, and the Tibet Air Shower array in Yangbajain.

The mystery remains perplexing because the hotspots must be produced within about 0.03 light years of Earth. Further out, galactic magnetic fields should deflect the particles so much that the hotspots would be smeared out across the sky. But no such sources are known to exist.


It's also hitting the northern magnetosphere and is coming from 0.03 light years away.

Mystery Cosmic Rays Zapping South Pole -- "From the Neutron Star of the Vela Supernova?"

I live out in the bush and the number of 737-sized silver/white planes flying overhead in formation pumping out chemtrails in an otherwise virgin skies over the last couple of weeks suggests that this problem is being dealt with, albeit not very successfully.



posted on Oct, 3 2011 @ 08:55 PM
link   

Originally posted by MasterGemini
Unprecedented Arctic Ozone Loss Occurred Last Winter
www.sciencedaily.com...




A NASA-led study has documented an unprecedented depletion of Earth's protective ozone layer above the Arctic last winter and spring that was caused by an unusually prolonged period of extremely low temperatures in the stratosphere.
. . .
The Antarctic ozone hole forms when extremely cold conditions, common in the winter Antarctic stratosphere, trigger reactions that convert atmospheric chlorine from human-produced chemicals into forms that destroy ozone. While the same ozone-loss processes occur each winter in the Arctic, the generally warmer stratospheric conditions there limit the area affected and the time frame during which the chemical reactions occur. This means there is generally far less ozone loss in most years in the Arctic than in the Antarctic.


As the article states this was caused by unusually frigid temperatures in the atmosphere. Interesting to see the "scientific" community of climatologists actually got a prediction right for once.

Additional Info for those following the study:

NASA Study Sheds Light On Ozone Hole Chemistry
www.sciencedaily.com...

Record Depletion of Arctic Ozone Layer Causing Increased UV Radiation in Scandinavia
www.sciencedaily.com...

Antarctic Ozone Hole Shrinking Because Of Mild Weather, Not Recovery
www.sciencedaily.com...

Record Ozone Loss Over the North Pole
www.sciencedaily.com...

So any thoughts?


Yeah I have a thought -- how come scientific is in quotes. Are you one of those who feel that every thing known is all there is to know so we might as well shut down all these silly sciencey guys every one knows science is useless propoganda
edit on 3-10-2011 by spyder550 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 3 2011 @ 11:16 PM
link   
reply to post by spyder550
 


Do you trust your weatherman enough to live day in and day out by their predictions?



posted on Oct, 3 2011 @ 11:20 PM
link   
reply to post by Praetorius
 

Win 7 opera 11.5...
Science Daily not blocked for me.


It's not ATS blocking the site. Maybe your browser or firewall....
edit on 10/3/2011 by Chamberf=6 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 5 2011 @ 04:22 PM
link   
reply to post by Chamberf=6
 
You are correct, I didn't mean ATS was blocking.

Network filter here at work...funny that I can access a conspiracy website on my break time, but can't access a science page.



new topics

top topics



 
4
<< 1   >>

log in

join