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What just slammed the Sun?

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posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 03:40 PM
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reply to post by xxnibiruxx
 


Thats a pretty BIG comet if you ask me. To the left of the image is mercury and the comet looks to be about the same size.




posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 03:42 PM
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reply to post by shug7272
 


Thank you! I'm a newby here and was kind of in a hurry, will try to remember that for next time! (and it's gal, not guy ;0 )



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 03:47 PM
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Look how BIG this comet is, it's the same size as mercury.






posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 04:18 PM
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Originally posted by TWISTEDWORDS
Look how BIG this comet is, it's the same size as mercury.



i have to correct you there dude, it's as bright as Mercury, the size of the object depends on the brightness, if you look at my post which has been quoted in the page before this one you will see that a comet that passed the sun a few years ago, though only a few km across, looks about twice the size of the comet we're discussing in this thread, there's one image above the other so you can compare the two.



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 04:28 PM
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reply to post by ignant
 





WOW - cant believe this isn't on the front page of newspapers etc incredible blast!!!


It's like they don't want people to know or something.

Now what if..I mean what if something was shot into the sun to see what would happen?What if the "blast" (it looked like a blast to me too)was the result of some sort of missile or rocket?


I take that back lol.I never realized the comet was the size of a planet!
edit on 4-10-2011 by GodIsPissed because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 04:38 PM
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reply to post by nuttin4U
 


This is actually a response to Dr. Strong (and to ATS)..perhaps i'll comment directly to him via youtube later.

The strongest (heh) argument he has against the comet and CME being connected are conservation of mass and energy. Stated simply, if all we consider is the mass and energy (velocity+temp) associated with the comet and compare that to the same CME ejection from Sol then there is clearly a miss match and we all know that the laws of conservation cannot be broken... or should know.

However, this is only true if we consider just the comet. In this case i'm going to take a few lessons from an old Cornell Prof (who was kicked out for his electric solar system theory: i'll post docs and names later) and discuss how the reaction we saw might be possible in the light of this hypothesis.

First i want to point out that Sol's reaction happened NOT when the comet impacted, but when the tail had fully collapsed. Dr. Dooder was using the time mismatch between comet impact and CME eruption to argue against a connection.

the connection is between the collapse of the tail and the eruption.

why?

because the tail is not a nebulous mix of gases recently evaporated off the comet (as current theory holds), the tail is a nebulous mix of positive ions that have ACCUMULATED on the negatively charged comet as it passed into the inner system. The tail is actually a field that has been generated as the sun dumps excess electrons (due to high proton emission in the solar wind) through the comet and into the positively charged ort cloud.

-think about how tails actual form and move and this will make more sense: some comets form forward! spikes. why does the coma shrink when nearer to the sun (tail longer tho)? How do these loose evaporated particles whip around the sun faster than the comet and still hold shape? How can comas be so huge way out at Saturn's orbit where the solar infrared is minuscule?-

The eruption happened when that field collapsed and the electron flow was cut off. it was huge because the energies being dumped into the ort cloud were huge.

try that on for size.

i'll post more complete docs that inspired this thought later.



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 04:52 PM
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Originally posted by GodIsPissedI take that back lol.I never realized the comet was the size of a planet!


Probably because it wasn't, it was rather bright, hence why it appeared so big,

If you want the proof it's not that big, click "it wasn't" in the line above


edit on 10/4/11 by djz3ro because: i thought i should point out the link



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 04:55 PM
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Originally posted by galactixThis is actually a response to Dr. Strong (and to ATS)..perhaps i'll comment directly to him via youtube later.


If you do, please tell us how he responds, i would be interested to hear his thoughts on this too, i was discussing this with him earlier today (the OP topic not what you have proposed).

I am new to the electric universe theory, i only heard about it in the past year and haven't looked into it yet.



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 05:03 PM
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reply to post by djz3ro
 


Then why is it the same brightness as mercury? You said the size of an object in space is correlated to the brightness of the object. They look the same to me. Also, I have seen comets go into the SUN before and they were a lot smaller looking. They also didn't cause a huge explosion as we witnessed. I frankly don't care what NASA says about their explanation. NASA can't even get their stories straight about water on MARS amongst other things.
edit on 4-10-2011 by TWISTEDWORDS because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 05:16 PM
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Originally posted by TWISTEDWORDSThe why is it the same brightness as mercury? You said the size of an object in space is correlated tot he brightness of the object. They look the same to me. Also, I have seen comets go into the SUN before and they were a lot smaller looking. They also didn't cause a huge explosion as we witnessed. I frankly don't care what NASA says about their explanation. NASA can't even get their stories straight about water on MARS amongst other things.


Because comets differ in brightness, this one is about the same as mercury, the link i gave shows a comet that passed a while ago, a few km across yet it looks bigger than this one which is rumoured to be planet sized. I actually didn't get my info from NASA but from Doc Strong, he does a daily Sun Weather Report on Youtube.

Also the explosion occurred a full 2 hrs 25 mins after the tail of the comet finished going into the sun, because it's sped up so much it looked like it caused that mass explosion.

I felt the same as you when i came into this thread but have spent the past 24 or more hours researching the topic (insomnia has it's uses) and have learned much about the current understanding of CME's, there is about a 1/1000 chance that my explanation is completely wrong.and if someone can explain it a different way i will be more than happy to listen



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 05:22 PM
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reply to post by TWISTEDWORDS
 



You said the size of an object in space is correlated to the brightness of the object.

No.
The size of an object in the coronograph images is correlated to the brightness of the object. The comet was very bright, therefore it appears large. It was very bright because it was very close to the Sun and reflecting a lot of sunlight.

The Sun has a diameter of about 1,391,000 km. Mercury has a diameter of 4,879 km. 285 Mercuries would fit across the face of the Sun.

Now look at the coronograph images. In the coronograph image, the white circle in the disk represents the actual size of the Sun behind it. Now, compare the size of Mercury to that of the Sun. In reality, Mecury would be smaller than a single pixel in the images. The reason it looks so large is because the light from it is bright enough to oversaturate the pixel that actually registers it. The extra electrons from that pixel "bleed" into the surrounding pixels. The brighter an object is the more pixels will be affected. That is also why the "wings" appear on bright objects, pixels in the same row are affected more than those in other rows.

But, in the image of Comet Merholz, it is not Mercury which appears but Venus. At the time Venus was on the far side of the Sun, nearly at opposition so it's angular size would have been even less than that of Mercury.
edit on 10/4/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 05:24 PM
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reply to post by galactix
 


Cornell Prof = Jim McCanney

linked are his website (He's kinda freakin' out over that recent solar comet impact) and a link to some commentary.

I don't think he's got it all right, but ignoring EM effects in solar system dynamics is just stupid. And it really does make sense for how Elinin could effect earth and why nuthin' happened 7/26 (not that i expected anything too).

starting to think Nov 20 might be an issue tho...

His website
commentary
edit on 4-10-2011 by galactix because: formatting



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 05:37 PM
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Originally posted by galactixstarting to think Nov 20 might be an issue tho...


Blackpool V Wolves at the football (soccer)?

The end of the Edinburgh Fiddle Festival?

Red Hot Chilli Peppers at the LG Arena in Birmingham?

Batzido?

The Saw Doctors at the Millenium Forum? That must be it?

If it's on that site, it hurt my eyes, can you provide a link or at least tell us what's expected that date?



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 05:38 PM
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reply to post by galactix
 


the dirty ice ball theory of comets dies a horrible death in the face of actual flyby data: McCanny's rant



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 05:40 PM
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reply to post by djz3ro
 


I actually did a quick calculation on how long it would take for the comet in question to go from the edge of the blue circle to the Sun and surprisingly it would take roughly 2.22 hours by using simple GIMP measuring tool to see the distance from the blue circle to the SUN. So it took 2.22 hours when we lost sight of the comet to reach impact, which correlates to the explosion 2.5 hours later or so.



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 05:42 PM
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reply to post by djz3ro
 


pretty good guesses..

and it's more like Nov 23, or as near as i can tell using the JPL browser: it is the day we pass between Elenin and Sol.



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 05:46 PM
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Originally posted by TWISTEDWORDS
reply to post by djz3ro
 


I actually did a quick calculation on how long it would take for the comet in question to go from the edge of the blue circle to the Sun and surprisingly it would take roughly 2.22 hours by using simple GIMP measuring tool to see the distance from the blue circle to the SUN. So it took 2.22 hours when we lost sight of the comet to reach impact, which correlates to the explosion 2.5 hours later or so.


Now that is interesting, i haven't downloaded GIMP onto my new laptop yet and didn't think of that, nice find!



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 05:48 PM
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Originally posted by galactix
reply to post by djz3ro
 


pretty good guesses..

and it's more like Nov 23, or as near as i can tell using the JPL browser: it is the day we pass between Elenin and Sol.

I thought we were already passing through its tail, if it was still going?

I dunno what to make of that guy you posted sites for, his latest post says that CNN have posted, on their youtube channel, a news video about NASA announcing a Brown Dwarf which is pushing comets our way, so i went to the CNN youtube channel and he appear to be telling porky pies!



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 05:54 PM
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reply to post by djz3ro
 


not passing thru it's tail. that comes near Halloween: Oct 31/Nov 2 ish.
what happened was that Elenin passed between us and Sol, on 8/26 ish. If the plasma discharge hypothesis is true then we should not be effected until we pass thru the connection between Sol and Elenin..on Nov 20/23 ish.

nice checking up on that youtube reference: i might look myself.
i agree that the guy sounds a bit shrill... lol.
But he's got training and his ideas make some sense and he can write in sensible language..and his ideas certainly explain the data and observations better than the dirty iceball hypothesis.

shrug.
i can't wait to hunt for Elenin with my new scope!

real time entertainment at it's best!



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 05:59 PM
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reply to post by TWISTEDWORDS
 

Your calculations are nice but because of the direction the comet approached the Sun at they aren't much use. We have a better perspective available.

From STEREO A, which is looking at the side of the Sun about 90º to the the right of what SOHO sees. The Earth is to the left. As you can see, the comet would have been well behind the coronograph disk on SOHO at this time.


Here the beginning of the CME, emerging from behind the disk, can be seen at the 1 o'clock position.


Here it is a little later.


Keeping in mind that the white circle represents the diameter of the Sun itself, it looks like the CME actually began before the "impact".
edit on 10/4/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)



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