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What just slammed the Sun?

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posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 10:16 AM
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reply to post by xxnibiruxx
 


Well, it's their spacecrafts.

BTW two comets plunged into the sun in a 10-day span in May, another in June, one in July, there were 2 in August, one in September, March...*yawn*...




posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 10:18 AM
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reply to post by CrikeyMagnet
 


We have samples from the core of the sun, they are called atomic bombs.



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 10:26 AM
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Bernard Fleck from SOHO replied on my mail:

Thanks for your interest in the Sun and SOHO!

Yes, that was a sungrazing comet, of the type known as a Kreutz sungrazer (en.wikipedia.org...), and a particularly bright one at that. We don't have a definitive orbit calculated for it yet, and it doesn't have a number or number yet, but most sungrazing comets have orbits which take them very close to the Sun without actually quite hitting it.
However, getting so close almost always destroys these comets, so we see them going in, but not going back out.

You may have noticed that the disappearance of the comet coincided with a large corona mass ejection. The question of whether a sungrazing comet can somehow trigger a coronal mass ejection is an intriguing one. So far, the feeling is that apparent relationship between some comets and some mass ejections is simply one of co-incidence. At this stage of the solar cycle, the Sun is producing many mass ejections--in fact there were several earlier in the day--and it probably just happened by chance that one of them was around the same time as the approach of the comet. Some researchers have been looking for a more direct relationship, but nothing as yet has come out of these efforts.

Hope this helps.

Kind regards,

Bernhard Fleck



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 10:28 AM
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Originally posted by Human_Alien


I honestly don't know how to read these satellite images but it's fairly obvious that SOMETHING huge hit the Sun a couple of hours ago.

Being the suspicious person that I am (thanks ATS) do you suppose that was Elenin? Or Comet 2005YU? That wasn't a teeny tiny 'comet'. Like the guy says, that was friggin' Earth-sized!

Does NASA really edit out their videos like this YT-er is suggesting? Wouldn't they realize people grab them 24 hours a day then upload them? So what's the point of editing them out (if they do)? They'd just calling more attention to themselves.

I don't know about the goings-on with the no-tell NASA boys but I thought this was worth sharing


Comment please.

lasco-www.nrl.navy.mil
(visit the link for the full news article)


Where exactly is (or was) the edited or doctored video? I know the guy says on the video that *this one is the uncut one* but I don't think that evidence alone is goo enough. I want to see the doctored video as well.

-rrr



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 10:35 AM
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Hey,

Is this normal for the SUN to look like this? I am no SUN expert, but doesn't this look rather odd?

What is shooting out of the SUN at 8:00 O' Clock.

lasco-www.nrl.navy.mil...
edit on 4-10-2011 by TWISTEDWORDS because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 10:55 AM
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I'm kinda late to the party..but just reading the first few pages, and seeing the last image posted is enough for me to know this isn't normal.



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 10:58 AM
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reply to post by djz3ro
 


Hi djz3ro,
Thanks for that although I had seen it already, my post to 10thL was just a little humour.

The only things I would be curious about is the flaring that occurs on the right at about 19.00, the approx time of the piece of comet grazing the Sun, except you can't see so much because of the central Sun blocker. Could that have been an interaction of some sort. Since there is serious study of interaction between events like solar flares far apart, one can be free to speculate that the comet could have been a trigger to start a chain of events across the Sun.

www.universetoday.com...-89433

In the last segment of the last video, the comet seen grazing the Sun is from July, not October, although the text seems to indicate that it is.
edit on 4-10-2011 by smurfy because: Restore link.



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 11:03 AM
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reply to post by TWISTEDWORDS
 


I too, am waiting for one of the better informed on the subject, to chime in here. Very interesting photo, to say the least.

TY for posting it...



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 11:05 AM
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20 pages and not one single good explanation about how comets can impact the sun without vaporizing.



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 11:08 AM
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Originally posted by Enlightenme1111
20 pages and not one single good explanation about how comets can impact the sun without vaporizing.


Has it been established, that it even is a comet? So far, it appears that this...anomaly...caught quite a few people off-guard. Just sayin'...



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 11:17 AM
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Originally posted by Destinyone

Originally posted by Enlightenme1111
20 pages and not one single good explanation about how comets can impact the sun without vaporizing.


Has it been established, that it even is a comet? So far, it appears that this...anomaly...caught quite a few people off-guard. Just sayin'...


That's the point of my post. I see 20 pages of people claiming it was a comet, and zero explanation of how it's possible for a comet to impact the sun without vaporizing long before. Out of all possibilities of what it could be, a comet seems to be the least likely explanation.



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 11:18 AM
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reply to post by TWISTEDWORDS
 

Nothing is shooting out of the Sun at 8:00. That is the support bar for the coronograph disk.

Nice CME though. It is from the same region on the far side of the Sun which produced the CME around the time of the "impact" (and for a few days before). If that region keeps up this kind of activity things could get interesting in a couple of weeks as it rotates to our side of the Sun.



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 11:21 AM
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Originally posted by Oxize
Bernard Fleck from SOHO replied on my mail:

Thanks for your interest in the Sun and SOHO!

Yes, that was a sungrazing comet, of the type known as a Kreutz sungrazer (en.wikipedia.org...), and a particularly bright one at that. We don't have a definitive orbit calculated for it yet, and it doesn't have a number or number yet, but most sungrazing comets have orbits which take them very close to the Sun without actually quite hitting it.
However, getting so close almost always destroys these comets, so we see them going in, but not going back out.

You may have noticed that the disappearance of the comet coincided with a large corona mass ejection. The question of whether a sungrazing comet can somehow trigger a coronal mass ejection is an intriguing one. So far, the feeling is that apparent relationship between some comets and some mass ejections is simply one of co-incidence. At this stage of the solar cycle, the Sun is producing many mass ejections--in fact there were several earlier in the day--and it probably just happened by chance that one of them was around the same time as the approach of the comet. Some researchers have been looking for a more direct relationship, but nothing as yet has come out of these efforts.

Hope this helps.

Kind regards,

Bernhard Fleck



This sounds like public pacification to me! I read the letter and re-read it and am none the wiser after starting this thread yesterday!

So why was the CME and the so-called comet timing "intriguing" to him when we have a bunch of brainatics right here at ATS who KNOW it was nothing but a huge coincidence and happens all the time? Perhaps NASA should send a Scout to ATS for recruitment!

So to recap he says: Some comets have an orbit which takes them very close to the Sun and not hit it. And YET.....when they ARE that close, they almost always get destroyed.

So Mr Fleck, was that the case with this one? And if so (because we didn't see it emerge so we're assuming it got destroyed) what exactly are you using to calculate its orbit? Random numbers that 'could be' right?


And how about your other statement of: relationship between some comets and some mass ejections is simply one of co-incidence
So am I to assume others aren't?

I liken this coincidence-theory to a raging thunder storm where a bolt of lightning hits a house but at the same time, the kitchen wiring sparked a fire and it all went up in flames destroying all evidence!
I mean, what are the odds?

But I will give Mr Fleck this much, at least he's saying he doesn't know. More than I can say about some people at ATS who think they are physics prodigies!



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 11:22 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by TWISTEDWORDS
 

Nothing is shooting out of the Sun at 8:00. That is the support bar for the coronograph disk.

Nice CME though. It is from the same region on the far side of the Sun which produced the CME around the time of the "impact" (and for a few days before). If that region keeps up this kind of activity things could get interesting in a couple of weeks as it rotates to our side of the Sun.


Thanks...so, interesting, as in make some popcorn? Or, interesting as in, check contents of my BOB [bug out bag].

edit on 4-10-2011 by Destinyone because: (no reason given)

edit on 4-10-2011 by Destinyone because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 11:22 AM
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reply to post by Enlightenme1111
 

A large enough comet might "impact" the Sun but not one of this size. They can get very close before going "poof".


edit on 10/4/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 11:39 AM
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Originally posted by smurfy
Hi djz3ro,
Thanks for that although I had seen it already, my post to 10thL was just a little humour.

The only things I would be curious about is the flaring that occurs on the right at about 19.00, the approx time of the piece of comet grazing the Sun, except you can't see so much because of the central Sun blocker. Could that have been an interaction of some sort. Since there is serious study of interaction between events like solar flares far apart, one can be free to speculate that the comet could have been a trigger to start a chain of events across the Sun.

www.universetoday.com...-89433

In the last segment of the last video, the comet seen grazing the Sun is from July, not October, although the text seems to indicate that it is.
edit on 4-10-2011 by smurfy because: Restore link.


i don't see flaring at 1900, from what i saw, there was one before the comet hit slightly anti clockwise from where the comet enters, but the lfaring from the other side doesn't seem to start until around 2125.

I'm not saying that something suitably large travelling at a suitable speed wouldn't cause a CME, in fact to me it makes sense that it would, i just mean it doesn't appear to be the case in this instance because of the time gap between impact and CME and the angle of the CME.



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 11:41 AM
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reply to post by Human_Alien
 

Hi Alien,
The e-mail is consistent enough. The Solar Dynamics Observatory is doing work in that area, and it seems that they already have the notion that there are some kind of links between events far apart on the Sun, although that in itself does not include comets, they are looking for some possible kind of interaction between the Sun and comets too, as far as I know they already have a previous event under study.



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 11:43 AM
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reply to post by Human_Alien
 

It was the death star...BOOOM.

Had to make a joke cause with all the doom and gloom posts, if you can't joke about stuff then whats the point?



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 11:57 AM
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Although the large CME occurred 2 hours after the object made impact, does not mean that it was not a result of the impact, it may have just taken that much time to react. Look at it like a very big object like a person or a tall building tipping over, the time of ground impact will be much slower than compared to a lighter person, or shorter building, but the momentum is greater. Now just because I am using a person and a building on a small scale to compare the time frame between the CME of the sun and the impact of an unknown object on a larger scale, the rules still apply


As above so below

edit on 4-10-2011 by xxnibiruxx because: grammar



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 12:02 PM
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All you have to do to see the movie of it is go here sohodata.nascom.nasa.gov... and enter the configurations on my print screen I have here and you will see the explosion.

SOHO Configuration



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